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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wouldn't, but I am constantly reminded of the Giulia's large turning radius. No free lunch?
 

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There are no tight u turns on tracks......
My answer: no way I would want to give up steering input.....
 

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Had some time to waste so I pulled data from Consumer Reports, since most magazines don't report turning radius...

Giulia 2.0 - 39 feet
Benz C300 - 38
BMW 330 - 40
Caddy ATS 2.0 - 37
Audi A4 - 40
Infiniti Q50 - 39
Lexus IS - 37
Volvo S60 - 38
Subaru WRX - 37
Genesis G80 - 38
Porsche Boxster - 37
Corvette - 38 feet
 

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2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
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Had some time to waste so I pulled data from Consumer Reports, since most magazines don't report turning radius...

Giulia 2.0 - 39 feet
Benz C300 - 38
BMW 330 - 40
Caddy ATS 2.0 - 37
Audi A4 - 40
Infiniti Q50 - 39
Lexus IS - 37
Volvo S60 - 38
Subaru WRX - 37
Genesis G80 - 38
Porsche Boxster - 37
Corvette - 38 feet
All turning "circle" or diameter numbers, not turning radius.
Diameter on my Protege is an almost too sharp 34 feet. OTOH, I don't have to lock the steering in my favorite hairpin turns.
Diameter on my truck is an out of control 50 feet or so. One learns how to do 3 point turns in an intersection real fast.

Anyway, if it is 39 feet on Giulia I think it should be "good enough" and not worth degrading anything else to try to make it tighter. If it was 50 feet that would be a different matter.

An interesting aside: Commercial trucks have a peculiar steering arrangement that allows the wheels to be turned "extra tight" when the vehicle is moving slowly. The steering resistance increases by a factor of 3-4 when this is engaged. It is used only for parking and making U turns. I am not familiar with the mechanism, only with operating it. I wonder if something like that is feasible in a sport-sedan?

Second aside: there are multiple ways to measure the turning circle. You could measure inside tire track (rear wheels are "inside"), outside tire track (front wheels are "outside"), centerline track, inside body track or outside body track. More subtle is how far to drive with the wheels locked before measuring. Because the rear wheels do not track behind the front wheels in a turn (so-called off tracking), the turning circle decreases slightly as the vehicle moves through a turn. The longer the vehicle the more noticeable off tracking will be. Due to this, it is best to only compare measurements from one source.

You know it is a hairpin turn if to see forward you are either looking through the passenger side of the windshield or the drivers side window.
 

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I am pretty sure Consumer report measured all of them the same way, no need to make a doctoral disertation out of it...

It looks like Giulia has an average turning circle diameter....it feels a bit different at the lock then say bmw or audi which might make some feel it is not turning that tight...but no I would not trade that steering feeling of Giulia for tighter turning radius
 

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I don't know if you have to give up one for the other but if I do then YES, I find the turning circle or radius or whatever too big - causing me to have to 3 point turn it in a number of situations in parking lots/driveways/etc. I find it quite annoying! Thank you for asking, John

I may be wrong but I think my Pacifica is like 20 feet! It feels way more maneuverable...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There are no tight u turns on tracks......
My answer: no way I would want to give up steering input.....
Yeah, even the Fairmont hairpin wouldn't be much of a challenge. However, my car may never see a track (though we drive by M1 Concourse frequently). Just this weekend there were a couple of parking lots that felt tighter in my Giulia than they did in my wife's Jeep. Perhaps it's that I'm coming from a much larger car with a not-much-larger turning radius, so I perceive the Giulia doesn't turn tightly (I hope that makes sense). Anyway, I wouldn't trade steering feel either.
 

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Would you like me to go back and divide each one in half?
No, just don't post turning circle numbers and call them turning radius'.

At steering lock (or near it) the handling of my Protege goes "weird"; I do not know how else to describe it. I lose all steering feel and the car feels like it really does not want to turn so hard. Slightly shorter wheelbase, slightly sharper wheel angle than Giulia. This weirdness might be even more problematic for Giulia because of the different steering tuning that it has.
 

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Curb to curb turning diameter for the 2.0L Giulia is 10.8 meters (35.4 feet), The Quadrifoglio has a slightly larger turning diameter, at 11.3 meters (37.1 feet). Wall to wall diameter will be a bit larger, of course. For the record, the Pacifica has a 39.7 feet curb to curb turning diameter.
 

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Don't go calling them turning circles when they are turning diameters. And that would be radii.
Not trying to be too pedantic but both Wikipedia and Motortrend define turning circle as the distance between curbs that the vehicle can turn between (outside wheel measurement). That is, it is a "diameter". I believe that due to off tracking the path of the vehicle isn't quite a circle, so the term "diameter" isn't quite applicable, but curb to curb distance still applies and can be reasonably modeled by the largest circle that will fit between the curbs.

MacGeek says the turning circle is 35.4 feet, which is substantially different from the Consumer Reports number. I tend to believe MacGeek over Consumer Reports. The later has been known to give incorrectly measured information from time to time.
 

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Curb to curb turning diameter for the 2.0L Giulia is 10.8 meters (35.4 feet), The Quadrifoglio has a slightly larger turning diameter, at 11.3 meters (37.1 feet). Wall to wall diameter will be a bit larger, of course. For the record, the Pacifica has a 39.7 feet curb to curb turning diameter.
Why is the QV value larger? I was of the impression that they had the same steering geometry.
It would seem more likely that Q4 has the larger curb to curb distance, since the Q4 has CV joints with limitations on how hard they can be turned.
 

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Not trying to be too pedantic but both Wikipedia and Motortrend define turning circle as the distance between curbs that the vehicle can turn between (outside wheel measurement). That is, it is a "diameter". I believe that due to off tracking the path of the vehicle isn't quite a circle, so the term "diameter" isn't quite applicable, but curb to curb distance still applies and can be reasonably modeled by the largest circle that will fit between the curbs.

MacGeek says the turning circle is 35.4 feet, which is substantially different from the Consumer Reports number. I tend to believe MacGeek over Consumer Reports. The later has been known to give incorrectly measured information from time to time.
Since you read the official authority on all matters, Wikipedia, you would know that it says all three terms are commonly referred to interchangeably in automotive jargon. A circle isn't any more a diameter than a diameter is a radius. But since you're so smart, you knew that, but just cherry picked the reference that you wanted anyway.

Great! Now if you or MacGeek has data on other competing cars using the same standards of measurement for comparison as I have provided, that measurement would prove useful to draw conclusions from. I'll wait.
 

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Since you read the official authority on all matters, Wikipedia, you would know that it says all three terms are commonly referred to interchangeably in automotive jargon. A circle isn't any more a diameter than a diameter is a radius. But since you're so smart, you knew that, but just cherry picked the reference that you wanted anyway.

Great! Now if you or MacGeek has data on other competing cars using the same standards of measurement for comparison as I have provided, that measurement would prove useful to draw conclusions from. I'll wait.
Or, we could measure the circumference.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think in terms of avoiding damaging my car and others. Curbs? Sure, I don't want to scuff my wheels and tires. But more commonly it's fascias and fenders that have my attention. Oh yes, also pedestrians.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
At steering lock (or near it) the handling of my Protege goes "weird"; I do not know how else to describe it. I lose all steering feel and the car feels like it really does not want to turn so hard. Slightly shorter wheelbase, slightly sharper wheel angle than Giulia. This weirdness might be even more problematic for Giulia because of the different steering tuning that it has.
Your Protege probably lacks the software that defines so many steering characteristics today.
 
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