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2019 Quadrifoglio Rosso Red, yellow calipers, white/green stitching seats
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2 more cents.. driving around town and coming to a slow or moderate stop it really doesn't have great modulation (ok but not great) especially that last little bit before you come to a stop, I will say on the track it performs very well, seems like it was tuned for hard stops.
 

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2020 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sport Ti AWD
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2 more cents.. driving around town and coming to a slow or moderate stop it really doesn't have great modulation (ok but not great) especially that last little bit before you come to a stop, I will say on the track it performs very well, seems like it was tuned for hard stops.
My 2020 is better in this regard than my 2017 was.
 

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^^ I asked at the Dealership if there was new brake software for the newer cars, that could be loaded on the older cars. They said no.
 

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More than likely they couldn't fit a traditional brake system with the QV 2.9L V6 and they found this system that was available that would fit so they didn't have to redesign that section of the car, remember they had a strict timeline to get the car out because of Ferrari leaving FCA.
 

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Tipo 33 Stradale 1/18 scale
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Just curious. How’s is Ferrari leaving FCA Related to the development of the Giulia?
FCA took people from Ferrari to develop the Giulia, FCA only had so many months with Ferrari because Ferrari spinoff to be more independent from FCA, so once that was announced they had only about two years to develop the Giulia before FCA was no longer complete control of Ferrari.
 

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2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
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On braking technology there are way more scary schemes than brake by wire:

Since the 19th century Trains and large trucks have had air brakes. An air compressor generates compressed air and the brake actuator just operates a valve that controls the adding and removing of air pressure to the brakes. Hazards include the air compressor not being able to keep up with demand and water accumulation leading to the system freezing solid. Also, there is a large delay between operating the control and the brakes responding. This really is the pneumatic equivalent of brake by wire, with the only "back up" being the spring operated dead-man emergency brakes. At least operators of these things are required to test them daily.

Mid-size trailers often have electric brakes (no hydraulics). For emergency trailer braking, these have a battery back up system. Does anybody check that said battery has and will hold a charge?
 

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2018 Vulcano Black Giulia Quadrifoglio
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2 more cents.. driving around town and coming to a slow or moderate stop it really doesn't have great modulation (ok but not great) especially that last little bit before you come to a stop, I will say on the track it performs very well, seems like it was tuned for hard stops.
Apologies if you know this already, but smooth stops are possible if you manually downshift into 1st as you come to a stop, which can also be done in automatic
 
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yeah nah
MK C2 was BMWs version

Continental Wins 2022 PACE Technology and Partnership Awards

https://au.news.yahoo.com/continental-wins-2022-pace-technology-185300569.html

Continental’s MK C2 brake-by-wire system, developed jointly with BMW Group, wins 2022 Automotive News PACE Award
The BMW M8 uses the MK C1 - if this article is correct:
 

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Tipo 33 Stradale 1/18 scale
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getting bogged down in semantics proves little, Alfa were first to market and continue to be the segment leader, regardless of what BMW may claim

BMW remain, the penultimate driving machine
 

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More than likely they couldn't fit a traditional brake system with the QV 2.9L V6 and they found this system that was available that would fit so they didn't have to redesign that section of the car, remember they had a strict timeline to get the car out because of Ferrari leaving FCA.
No. If anything a BBW system requires more h/w because there is actually still a traditional hydraulic brake control in place as a backup in case BBW fails.

FCA took people from Ferrari to develop the Giulia, FCA only had so many months with Ferrari because Ferrari spinoff to be more independent from FCA, so once that was announced they had only about two years to develop the Giulia before FCA was no longer complete control of Ferrari.
You forgot the part that FCA was and Stellantis remains still the single largest shareholder of Ferrari after the spinoff. It really wasn't about control of Ferrari. It was about, in stock market terms, "unlocking shareholder value" and in layman terms "getting more money for the company and by extension the owners".
 

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No. If anything a BBW system requires more h/w because there is actually still a traditional hydraulic brake control in place as a backup in case BBW fails.


You forgot the part that FCA was and Stellantis remains still the single largest shareholder of Ferrari after the spinoff. It really wasn't about control of Ferrari. It was about, in stock market terms, "unlocking shareholder value" and in layman terms "getting more money for the company and by extension the owners".
During the launch of the Giulia they even announced it was smaller and lighter to use the Continental System over a traditional system.

There's been several documentaries about the Giulia talking about how Sergio Marchionne had limited time to Make the Giulia because of them having less control over Ferrari engineers in the near future.
Yes they are still the largest shareholders but still less than before.
 
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