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I think the reason pretty much every manufacturer has switched to BBW is that it allows for things like forward collision auto-braking and semi-autonomous driving.
 

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That's correct. If anything Alfa is very late to the BBW world.
 

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Alfa was the first to use Continental’s system.

Lighter, elimination of brake fade, and other features listed here:

 

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Late? I believe the Giulia Q was one of the fist production cars with BBW.
According to wikipedia many hybrid and EVs have BBW, which has been used in production vehicles since 1998. The article is flagged as needing work, so I do not know if that information is reliable.
 

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According to wikipedia many hybrid and EVs have BBW, which has been used in production vehicles since 1998. The article is flagged as needing work, so I do not know if that information is reliable.
Giulia and Stelvio use Continental's MK C1 BBW system, in 2016 it was the most advanced system and debuted in the Alfas. Last year the MKC2 (second generation) was introduced. I'm not sure if this was fitted in MY22 Alfas.
 

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Also works well with Adaptive Cruise Control when someone passes then moves over into your lane ahead and promptly slows down.
That's when I want countermeasures.
 

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Giulia and Stelvio use Continental's MK C1 BBW system, in 2016 it was the most advanced system and debuted in the Alfas. Last year the MKC2 (second generation) was introduced. I'm not sure if this was fitted in MY22 Alfas.
The question you should ask yourself with that info already in your pocket is, "Is Continental's MK C1 BBW system one of the first BBW systems or is it just another one among many others already existing?"
 

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I watched a video way back on the BBW and stated that it also improves reaction time to braking. So reaction time improved when you press the brake and also when the pre-collision feature is activated, therefore it can save you from crashing by a split second better reaction time which at higher speeds can mean a few feet shorter stopping distances.
 

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The question you should ask yourself with that info already in your pocket is, "Is Continental's MK C1 BBW system one of the first BBW systems or is it just another one among many others already existing?"
my understanding is that Alfa Romeo was the first manufacturer to put the BBW system in a production car (i.e. mass production)
 

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my understanding is that Alfa Romeo was the first manufacturer to put the BBW system in a production car (i.e. mass production)
Is that so? That's not what I remember but it also wouldn't be the first time I'm wrong. :ROFLMAO:
 

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my understanding is that Alfa Romeo was the first manufacturer to put the BBW system in a production car (i.e. mass production)
nervously laughs in Sensotronic Brake Control (SBC) :ROFLMAO:
technically I think first was Toyota with Prius to adopt brake-by-wire. but as it is hybrid not sure if it is pure BBW system.

another one is Mercedes who introduced it in like ~2001 and called it SBC (Sensotronic Brake Control). this had a lot of attention due to constantly failing. system was so shitty they had to recall more than half a million cars. customers on recalled cars got conventional brake system for free. I think even now if you got car with SBC Mercedes will replace it.
 

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Continental’s Brake-by-Wire Benefits

Continental’s Brake-by-Wire Benefits

HANOVER, Germany – When Alfa Romeo introduced its Intelligent Braking System (IBS), on the Giulia and Stelvio, it was the first use in production of the MKC1 brake-by-wire system. Developed by Continental, this wraps up usually separate components into one neat package that’s lighter and far more compact than the sum of its parts.


Drive-by-wire concepts were originally aimed at making everything electronic, with no mechanical connection between the driver and the car. The idea was that electric calipers would do the braking and electric steering racks would enable fancy features such as enabling the car to take major avoiding action in emergency situations without ripping the driver’s thumbs off on the steering wheel spokes.


The Continental MKC1 system goes part of the way to full brake-by-wire but stops short of electric brake calipers. What it does do is integrate the tandem master brake cylinder (which generates the hydraulic pressure to apply the brakes), the brake booster, the ABS unit and the ESC unit, saving about 4kg.


Aside from the packaging and weight, pedal feel can be tuned by engineers using driving simulators to give a more aggressive response on track and a more relaxed response in traffic. Another advantage is that pedal travel doesn’t increase when the brakes take a beating and get hot. What the driver actually feels is a simulator built in to the MKC1 that generates the sensation normally fed back through the hydraulics, only it remains consistent however hard the brakes are working.


Full drive-by-wire wire brakes would also allow manufacturers to dispense with hydraulic brake fluid, giving them dry chassis and production lines that have no need for the messy liquid. Complete corners consisting of suspension, wheel hubs, discs and brakes could be preassembled ready to bolt on the car. A further advantage of doing away with hydraulic brake fluid is that it’s hygroscopic (it absorbs atmospheric moisture) so needs changing at intervals.
 
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