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Just got my Giulia RWD converted over to Otis LA black zinc studs. And some longer lug nuts.

I wanted something a little more aggressive then the factory bolts. Might change the color up in the future but I think they match well with the wheels.

Backs stick out more due to the backspacing on the wheels.


If anyone wants to go the same route I listed a link below.

https://shopeurocompulsion.net/coll...otis-la-black-zinc-stud-kit-alfa-romeo-giulia



 

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Awwwe, but you'll miss the classic Italian back breaking, herniating experience. ;) Is there a small hanging and aligning pin on the rotor hub?
 

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I don't think there is an aligning pin, but the hub itself centers it. Studs just make is a lot easier to put the wheels on. Older Fiats and Alfas had studs, they went to bolts sometime in the 90's.

I think this is a worthwhile upgrade. Normally the studs we sell are black, but in Jordan's case he stripped off the black on the tips and clear coated them, which is why they look like bare metal.

The studs Joe mentioned are awesome, but more expensive at 359 bucks vs 94 for ours.

Links: Ours, https://shopeurocompulsion.net/coll...otis-la-black-zinc-stud-kit-alfa-romeo-giulia

Centerline's: https://www.centerlinealfa.com/catalog/titanium-stud-conversion-giulia

I have happy to see reputable vendors like Centerline adding products for the Giulias.

Greg
 

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2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
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I don't think there is an aligning pin, but the hub itself centers it. Studs just make is a lot easier to put the wheels on. Older Fiats and Alfas had studs, they went to bolts sometime in the 90's.

I think this is a worthwhile upgrade. Normally the studs we sell are black, but in Jordan's case he stripped off the black on the tips and clear coated them, which is why they look like bare metal.

The studs Joe mentioned are awesome, but more expensive at 359 bucks vs 94 for ours.

Links: Ours, https://shopeurocompulsion.net/coll...otis-la-black-zinc-stud-kit-alfa-romeo-giulia

Centerline's: https://www.centerlinealfa.com/catalog/titanium-stud-conversion-giulia

I have happy to see reputable vendors like Centerline adding products for the Giulias.

Greg
Of course, the titanium nuts and studs are almost impervious to corrosion. Titanium can also be anodized to iridescent colors (true iridescence, not colored to replicate iridescence).

OTOH, titanium-on-titanium has a well earned reputation for galling. All of the titanium fasteners on my bike are smeared with anti-seize to prevent this from happening. It is important to keep the threads in flawless condition, as a simple nick will start the galling process even with anti-seize. Have the Centerline studs been "field proven" on other vehicles of similar or greater weight and power?
 

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2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
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titanium is brittle also
Not so much if it is the right grade and processed properly.

"Grade 5" 6-4 Titanium
http://asm.matweb.com/search/SpecificMaterial.asp?bassnum=mtp642
160ksi yield, 10% elongation and 170ksi at break

Carbon steel used in SAE bolts
https://www.glaserbolt.com/materials-medium-carbon-steel-bolts-in-sae-j429-grades-2-5-8

Grade 5: 81ksi yield 14% elongation and 105ksi at break
Grade 8: 130ksi yield 12% elongation and 150ksi at break

I think strength wise the titanium has enough advantage that the small decrease in ductility is negated.
Some steel alloys may have better performance, but what matters is the grade of steel used in stock Giulia lug bolts. Does anybody know?

Titanium readily reacts with the Nitrogen in the air when heated and Titanium Nitride is extremely brittle. Thus it is very difficult to weld Titanium without making it brittle. The entire weld area must be immersed in an inert gas. Titanium also reacts with some metals at well below melting temps (I believe it was cadmium in hand tools used on SR-71 planes that led to many problems, but the leading edge of the wings of those planes was at cherry red temps in normal operation). I don't know if lug bolts can get hot enough from braking for that to be an issue.

Titanium has a lower modulus of elasticity than steel, so for bolts tightened to the same torque the titanium bolt should be more forgiving of dimensional changes of the object being held together.

In comparison 7075T6 aluminum (so-called aircraft aluminum) nearly matches the yield strength of Grade 5 steel, but is very brittle. It must be annealed to perform any plastic operations on it and the T6 heat treating is very difficult to replicate in the field (requires a furnace with sub 1F degree temperature control and stability, for example).
 

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Have the Centerline studs been "field proven" on other vehicles of similar or greater weight and power?
We have tested and sold quite a few kits for the 4C, which is lighter but also uses 12mm studs compared to the 14mm studs on the Giulia. I have been running the stud kit prototype on our QV for about 3 months now. We always test things before offering them to the public.

The manufacturer we use commonly makes titanium stud kits for other marques (mostly German) that are heavier and/or more powerful. They are not afraid to make suggestions with regard to design changes - it was at their recommendation that we stepped the Giulia kit up from a 17mm hex size to a 19mm hex size.

What I recommend to prevent galling is to clean the threads with brake cleaner every time you have the wheels off, which seems to keep them in good shape and keep dirt out of them. If you do use any type of lubricant, be sure to adjust your torque settings down to compensate.

FYI we also make titanium bolts which are a direct replacement for the OEM bolts. These outsell the stud conversion kit 5:1, but I am personally partial to the stud kit.
 

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We have tested and sold quite a few kits for the 4C, which is lighter but also uses 12mm studs compared to the 14mm studs on the Giulia. I have been running the stud kit prototype on our QV for about 3 months now. We always test things before offering them to the public.

The manufacturer we use commonly makes titanium stud kits for other marques (mostly German) that are heavier and/or more powerful. They are not afraid to make suggestions with regard to design changes - it was at their recommendation that we stepped the Giulia kit up from a 17mm hex size to a 19mm hex size.

What I recommend to prevent galling is to clean the threads with brake cleaner every time you have the wheels off, which seems to keep them in good shape and keep dirt out of them. If you do use any type of lubricant, be sure to adjust your torque settings down to compensate.

FYI we also make titanium bolts which are a direct replacement for the OEM bolts. These outsell the stud conversion kit 5:1, but I am personally partial to the stud kit.
Thanks for the info. Is there any chance of getting the nuts anodized red?

The titanium nuts and bolts on my bicycle will gall if assembled without some kind of lubricant. Once galled, they won't torque correctly and develop a bad habit of falling off. Been there, done that, expensive mistake. Those were all rolled thread 6-4 Ti, individually packaged to insure no thread damage during handling. What is different about your lug bolts/studs? Also, do you provide the correct tightening torque for lubricated and non-lubricated fasteners?

Do you manufacture other titanium fasteners for automobiles? Door hinge fasteners, hood and trunk lid hinge fasteners, and front seat fasteners all come to mind as relatively heavy pieces of iron that can be lightened by replacing them titanium without too much risk (except to one's pocket book). There might be others like motor mount nuts, window regulator fasteners and the fasteners in the dashboard (the later might be better in aluminum).
 
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