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Runflats are usually much heavier than their non-RunFlat counterparts. With no spare it’s easier to upgrade to a lighter wheel, and keep the runflats. This decreases unsprung weight, which usually ameliorates some of the pain that comes along with the runflat tires. It’s easier I say because of those hubcentric rings, which can get stuck, may give you hell when trying to replace with the spare.

So I basically always go with the lightest rim possible, and keep the runflat type of tire...
 

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I actually think it is pedant week at the Giulia forum and I wholeheartedly agree with PSG (after one simple puncture cost me nearly $800 to fix recently).
Runflats are more expensive right?
Most dealers are reluctant to repair runflats right? (I know there are anecdotes about relatives repairing them and still being alive a few months later but I am talking about approved guaranteed repairs)
Tyres that show some wear should be replaced in pairs right?
Various tyre goo is only approved until the tyres can be repaired "properly" and as PSG said has been associated with at least mess and at worse wheel damage. Right?
Manufacturers recommend even with run flats to have them repaired within 70kms/50 miles which is a problem in the country right?
Runflats generally have a trade off in terms of negative noise and/or handling and/ or expense and/or ride, right?
So PSG I'll take your question as rhetorical and conclude that there seems to be no satisfactory solution (especially for those travelling outside metropolitan areas, which would make Giulias and BMWs as useless as Teslas), so cross your fingers and don't ever end a sentence with the word "right". Now where did I put my medication?
Generally speaking, a run-flat version of a tire will be more expensive than a non run-flat. Using the Pirelli P Zero as an example from TireRack, the run-flats will be about $150 more for a set of four.

To the best of my knowledge, Continental is the only manufacturer that has ever officially stated that a run-flat can be repaired and only under very specific circumstances (pretty much easy fixes such as a nail in the middle of the tread). The very reason manufacturers (except for Continental) don't allow repairs to run-flats is because of the very benefit they provide - to drive a long distance on a flat tire. Using the common scenario of a nail in a tire; with a run flat you could have been driving hundreds of miles on a tire with a slow leak and never noticed until the TPMS finally came on to alert you. You have therefore already compromised the specially created sidewall that allows for you to drive safely on a flat. Because a manufacturer can't determine how long the car has been driven in a compromised condition, they don't want to accept the liability that comes with repairing it. The trade off is the ability to get somewhere safely and/or more convenient at the cost of a new tire. You can get a mom and pop shop to fix a run-flat but no reputable tire shop will.

Yes, tire goo is meant as a short term solution if you don't have a run-flat, tire repair kit or spare. Even with a non run-flat you would need to get the tire removed and cleaned thoroughly in addition to the wheel as soon as possible.

Using the Pirelli P Zero again as cited above, the non run-flat version will have better characteristics overall in every category versus the run-flat. Noise and treadwear are the most discernable characteristics but the AVERAGE driver would be hard pressed to distinguish all of the other criteria.

Personally I plan on switching to non run flats, but I also have a tire inflation kit, a bottle of goo and a DIY tire plug kit that fits under the trunk. I also have AAA, Alfa Care, Tri-Pac and my car insurance for a tow among other things if needed.
 

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My solution....run flats, extra full size tire on 5 hole rim in the trunk, AAA, and tire and rim insurance. I've had too many previous blowouts from potholes in NYC and would rather not be stuck on the cross Bronx waiting for a tow. I should add that I got the dealer to throw in the spare tire, jack kit and insurance. I will probably switch to non run flats when these are done because in my situation the run flats will probably never matter to me. I'm much more concerned with a blow out and not a nail. Sure I have no trunk space but that gives me an excuse to not be able to schlep stuff around! As an aside I'll never use continental tires again.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Generally speaking, a run-flat version of a tire will be more expensive than a non run-flat. Using the Pirelli P Zero as an example from TireRack, the run-flats will be about $150 more for a set of four.

To the best of my knowledge, Continental is the only manufacturer that has ever officially stated that a run-flat can be repaired and only under very specific circumstances (pretty much easy fixes such as a nail in the middle of the tread). The very reason manufacturers (except for Continental) don't allow repairs to run-flats is because of the very benefit they provide - to drive a long distance on a flat tire. Using the common scenario of a nail in a tire; with a run flat you could have been driving hundreds of miles on a tire with a slow leak and never noticed until the TPMS finally came on to alert you. You have therefore already compromised the specially created sidewall that allows for you to drive safely on a flat. Because a manufacturer can't determine how long the car has been driven in a compromised condition, they don't want to accept the liability that comes with repairing it. The trade off is the ability to get somewhere safely and/or more convenient at the cost of a new tire. You can get a mom and pop shop to fix a run-flat but no reputable tire shop will.

Yes, tire goo is meant as a short term solution if you don't have a run-flat, tire repair kit or spare. Even with a non run-flat you would need to get the tire removed and cleaned thoroughly in addition to the wheel as soon as possible.

Using the Pirelli P Zero again as cited above, the non run-flat version will have better characteristics overall in every category versus the run-flat. Noise and treadwear are the most discernable characteristics but the AVERAGE driver would be hard pressed to distinguish all of the other criteria.

Personally I plan on switching to non run flats, but I also have a tire inflation kit, a bottle of goo and a DIY tire plug kit that fits under the trunk. I also have AAA, Alfa Care, Tri-Pac and my car insurance for a tow among other things if needed.
Thank you for your reply!
 

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Discussion Starter #28
My solution....run flats, extra full size tire on 5 hole rim in the trunk, AAA, and tire and rim insurance. I've had too many previous blowouts from potholes in NYC and would rather not be stuck on the cross Bronx waiting for a tow. I should add that I got the dealer to throw in the spare tire, jack kit and insurance. I will probably switch to non run flats when these are done because in my situation the run flats will probably never matter to me. I'm much more concerned with a blow out and not a nail. Sure I have no trunk space but that gives me an excuse to not be able to schlep stuff around! As an aside I'll never use continental tires again.
What kind of spare tire and jack kit did you get from the dealer?
 

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My solution....run flats, extra full size tire on 5 hole rim in the trunk, AAA, and tire and rim insurance. I've had too many previous blowouts from potholes in NYC and would rather not be stuck on the cross Bronx waiting for a tow. I should add that I got the dealer to throw in the spare tire, jack kit and insurance. I will probably switch to non run flats when these are done because in my situation the run flats will probably never matter to me. I'm much more concerned with a blow out and not a nail. Sure I have no trunk space but that gives me an excuse to not be able to schlep stuff around! As an aside I'll never use continental tires again.
Why would a “blow out” render runflats lless meaningful than a nail?? I think you have that completely backwards!

a blow out, or rapid loss of pressure, is precisely the kind of situation where runflats are engineered to deliver safety through control and convenience through drivability. A conventional tire blowout renders the immediately unstable and unsafe, so the advantage of runflats should be obvious.

If a nail in the tread does not cause a blow out, then it is a slow leak, perhaps very slow, and has negligible impact on immediate drivability of eIther conventional or runflat tires. If the pressure monitor does it’s job, the driver should eBe aware of a slow leak before damage is done to tires or loss of drivability.

For these reasons, I do not understand what you are talking about.
 
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i have had one zero pressure puncture and a slow leak and was able to drive the car to the tyre shop both times ... one was a repair by Bridgestone

what happens is you are driving along and suddenly the instrument panel alerts you your pressure has dropped, the screen shows 20 psi and dropping fast, but you are still able to drive the car slowly

the whole point of a runflat is that you DONT end up stranded on the Sydney Harbour Bridge, ... or Brooklyn, Joisey or even Kansas City, Kansas
 

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i have had one zero pressure puncture and a slow leak and was able to drive the car to the tyre shop both times ... one was a repair by Bridgestone

what happens is you are driving along and suddenly the instrument panel alerts you your pressure has dropped, the screen shows 20 psi and dropping fast, but you are still able to drive the car slowly

the whole point of a runflat is that you DONT end up stranded on the Sydney Harbour Bridge, ... or Brooklyn, Joisey or even Kansas City, Kansas
Yes that was pretty much my story also. However after a short drive apparently the side wall was unrepairable. It still worries me what would happen if you were more than 50miles/70 kms from help an/or at night. For that reason I would recommend carrying a full sized decent quality bike pump in the boot/trunk for regional drives and as soon as the pressure drops top it up regularly. Yes I said bike pump- I am surprised how little air there is in these tyres and I have found that 10 or so pumps will put in about 5psi. I fortunately have never had a blow out.
 

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I thought they only protected against punctures and was under the impression that a sidewall blow out (I've experienced many in conventional tires) rendered run flats useless and that I wouldn't be able to drive on them if that did happen. It looks like I was wrong. Good to know.
 

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I thought they only protected against punctures and was under the impression that a sidewall blow out (I've experienced many in conventional tires) rendered run flats useless and that I wouldn't be able to drive on them if that did happen. It looks like I was wrong. Good to know.
Depending on the severity of the blow out, you can, but certainly not always.

The other truth is that, yes, with a typical nail in the tire scenario you can drive 50 mph for 50 miles. What they don’t tell you is that with a blow out you are looking at substantially fewer miles and mph. It may still help you get somewhere that is safer to pull over but you are most likely not getting to where you were planning to on that tire.
 

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Most cities now have at least moving tire truck, that will come right where you are and fix/replace your tire.
If they're busy you might end up waiting hours though... If you live in a decently paved road, it could be worth the risk.
If I lived in the middle of nowhere though, no way I would travel without spare or RFT.
 

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It is one thing that they don’t provide you a spare for weight and/or cost savings; the bigger disappointment is that they didn’t even create space below the trunk area to allow for the owner to buy and conveniently store their own spare.
 
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