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What do you think an undriven 2023 QV would be worth in 2035?

  • < $85K

    Votes: 13 28.9%
  • $85K - $100K

    Votes: 11 24.4%
  • $100K - $150K

    Votes: 8 17.8%
  • $150k - $250K

    Votes: 7 15.6%
  • $250K +

    Votes: 6 13.3%
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I think that within 10 -15 years, it will simply be an old QV. So, by 2035, even with no new ICEs available at the dealers, the 2023 QV will be an old car (<$85K). Now from 2053 on, it will be a collectible car with one of the best design and performance of an ICE so >$100K. So, do your kids a favor. Take care of that 2023 QV and in 30 years, they will appreciate it.
 

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I think it will be less than 85K just because of the lack of options for that model year. Now the older ones, such as 2017-2018s, with full options such as CCB, Sparco seats, paint options, they will fetch great value, if kept in mint condition, low kms.
 

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I suppose the best way to consider your question would be..... how much would you be willing to pay today for an undriven car from ~1997? an undriven Alfa Romeo from ~1997?
I think it’s more along lines of EV vs ICE demands in 2035. But make no mistake if ICE is truly banned the manufacturers will flood the market with them before that.
 

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I think it’s more along lines of EV vs ICE demands in 2035. But make no mistake if ICE is truly banned the manufacturers will flood the market with them before that.
Worst case you won't be able to sell the car in California or other states that follow suit, plus gasoline will be 10x the current price. End result is minimal value then and afterwards.
 

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These were $17K cars new. I think that not all the sedans are collectible cars but Giulia broke the mold already.

View attachment 132790
so it's 50-60 years. now put into account inflation.
but sometimes you might get lucky:
 

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These were $17K cars new. I think that not all the sedans are collectible cars but Giulia broke the mold already.

View attachment 132790
I have a Giulia GTV, and for decades the sedans were worth 20 to 40 percent of the coupes. In recent years, they have increased to being worth 50 to 70 percent of the coupes which is a good thing, but proves my point about sedans trailing coupes and convertibles.

If you want to buy a future Alfa collectable, a 4C is a much safer choice.
 

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Worst case you won't be able to sell the car in California or other states that follow suit, plus gasoline will be 10x the current price. End result is minimal value then and afterwards.
 

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We know that’s inevitable. Gas will be $1.89 a gallon and all is well.
Right but I am pointing out that it will not be "plus gasoline will be 10x the current price." as stated above.

"The decline in demand would accelerate to a rate of 2 million barrels of oil per day (bpd) to reach 35 million bpd by 2050, accounting for a 60% drop in carbon emissions from oil use from today's levels."

This will allow us to keep driving for nostalgic purposes. ;)
 

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Right but I am pointing out that it will not be "plus gasoline will be 10x the current price." as stated above.

"The decline in demand would accelerate to a rate of 2 million barrels of oil per day (bpd) to reach 35 million bpd by 2050, accounting for a 60% drop in carbon emissions from oil use from today's levels."

This will allow us to keep driving for nostalgic purposes. ;)
Yes. I agree.
 

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Oil is not gasoline. Making gasoline from oil is a complex process that is made cost tolerable by volume processing. The cost of distribution of gasoline is also made tolerable by having many refineries scattered all over. Cut down the volume and refineries close so distribution costs go up and the remaining refineries have trouble getting enough volume demand to keep costs down so costs go up more, and the cost of research needed to make the product burn right also goes up on a per-gallon basis.

Yes the initial impact of a reduction in demand for gasoline will be a drop in price, but the longer term impact will likely be a dramatic increase in price.
 

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Oil is not gasoline. Making gasoline from oil is a complex process that is made cost tolerable by volume processing. The cost of distribution of gasoline is also made tolerable by having many refineries scattered all over. Cut down the volume and refineries close so distribution costs go up and the remaining refineries have trouble getting enough volume demand to keep costs down so costs go up more, and the cost of research needed to make the product burn right also goes up on a per-gallon basis.

Yes the initial impact of a reduction in demand for gasoline will be a drop in price, but the longer term impact will likely be a dramatic increase in price.
"A rapid decline in demand also means that existing sources of oil supplies would be sufficient to meet all future demand, with only limited need for new oil field developments, WoodMac said." Plus whatever stashes we have in caves. lol

If we can make it to 2050 I am good. lol I will almost be 80.
 

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These were $17K cars new. I think that not all the sedans are collectible cars but Giulia broke the mold already.

View attachment 132790
Maybe a GTV cost $17k, but the 1960s cars illustrated above were $4-5k and expensive and underpowered relative to what was available from other mfgs at the time. The thing is that those are sport sedans and as such a rare thing in the 1960s. In the 1960s and 1970s in the USA the "yank tank" was the standard, huge cars with V8 power and little or no consideration of handling or braking.
 

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Maybe a GTV cost $17k, but the 1960s cars illustrated above were $4-5k and expensive and underpowered relative to what was available from other mfgs at the time. The thing is that those are sport sedans and as such a rare thing in the 1960s. In the 1960s and 1970s in the USA the "yank tank" was the standard, huge cars with V8 power and little or no consideration of handling or braking.
The original MSRP of a 74 GTV was $6,450, not $17,000. Sedans would have been cheaper.

JD Power MSRP
 
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