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Since these cars are direct injection do they require at a certain point walnut blasting?
We hope not!
With minimal blow-by (hopefully), a proper crankcase ventilation system (hopefully), and the driver keeping the combustion chamber temperatures higher (rather than lower), intake valve contamination can be kept in check.
GM used to make a product called Upper Engine Cleaner (??). It was a liquid that we would trickle into the carburetor throat while the engine was running, or suction into the intake manifold (on fuel injected engines) through a small vacuum hose.
This stuff worked great at cleaning the head of the intake valves and the combustion chamber.
I haven't seen it for sale for years.
 

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some cars are more notorious for CB than others with DI....ie: Audi RS4 usually get cleanings at 50k mark....my E39 M5 had it done at apprx 65k...
now those are N/A motors....so PERHAPS FI motors may be different???:confused:...really only time will tell...
 

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Lot's of people use SeaFoam for this these days. Not sure if there are an ramifications in using it if for a turbo engine though.
The GM elixir was SeaFoam X2.
It was da bomb.
With the carb cars, I would trickle it in, having to keep the RPMs up so it wouldn't stall. Then, with the last few ounces, dump it in quickly, and let it stall. Allow to sit for an hour or so and restart it. On the fuel infected engines, I would choose two vacuum hoses, one on the atmosphere side of the throttle plate, and one on the engine side. Trickle it in while running on the one and then stick the other one into the final few ounces to suck it in quickly, and stall it. Allow to sit for an hour or so and restart it. She would smoke like Willie Nelson, for the first couple of miles. Really made an improvement. I would always change the engine oil and filter afterwards, too.
FYI, never had to use it on an ALFA.:wink2:
As far as using products like these (the way I used them) on turbo engines; good question.
Newer cars with plastic intake manifolds, plastic ccv vacuum tubes, turbo impeller shaft seals... These very well might be adversely effected.
 

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SeaFoam had a throttle body cleaner I used to use on my carbureted bikes. Came with a long straw you could push up through the butterfly valves and I'd do the same as you. Always a certain sense of satisfaction and maybe morbid curiosity about how black the smoke would be after that stall/restart. Haha
 

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When I got my license my first car was a Mustang. My dads friend across the street was a Ford mechanic, helped me rebuild and replace various parts he found sub par. He cleaned the carbon buildup in the engine by dumping a gallon of water down the carb while running. Should have seen all of the steam and junk coming out of the exhaust!

My 2011 Audi S5 with the 4.2 V8 has over 90K miles on it, I have not had to do any carbon buildup cleaning, though it probably could use it by now.
 

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Reminder to self to dig up a photo of the intake manifold off of a V10 Audi motor. The intake passages were severely restricted due to carbon buildup over 80k miles.

One would think the direct injection engineering of the PCV systems would be far advanced by this point. Some sort of "filter" and catch-can combo seems to be the way to stop the oil vapor (wet) from making its way back into the intake.

The issue of carbon build-up in direct injection motors stems from the injectors being below the valves. In the old-school injector configurations, the injectors sprayed down onto the tops of the valves and offered a cleaning process.
 

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When I got my license my first car was a Mustang. My dads friend across the street was a Ford mechanic, helped me rebuild and replace various parts he found sub par. He cleaned the carbon buildup in the engine by dumping a gallon of water down the carb while running. Should have seen all of the steam and junk coming out of the exhaust!

My 2011 Audi S5 with the 4.2 V8 has over 90K miles on it, I have not had to do any carbon buildup cleaning, though it probably could use it by now.
I did the same with a 1971 Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser Rocket 350, and others. Trickle in water through the carburetor while running.
The GM elixir worked better using the stall-soak-restart method.
 

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Reminder to self to dig up a photo of the intake manifold off of a V10 Audi motor. The intake passages were severely restricted due to carbon buildup over 80k miles.

One would think the direct injection engineering of the PCV systems would be far advanced by this point. Some sort of "filter" and catch-can combo seems to be the way to stop the oil vapor (wet) from making its way back into the intake.

The issue of carbon build-up in direct injection motors stems from the injectors being below the valves. In the old-school injector configurations, the injectors sprayed down onto the tops of the valves and offered a cleaning process.
Eric, I agree. I would think that newer engines would manage the oil vapor and crank case ventilation better than they do. Introducing it into the combustion chamber for burning through CCVs and plastic tubes and manifolds onto the valve heads is certainly creating some problems for some manufactures. Usually higher mileage engines that are using lower and lower tension piston rings to eek out a bit more miles per gallon. Like my BMWs.
A catch can is a great solution. Except that it fails State Emission inspection and would require emptying. I have seen such systems added to some modern cars on various forums, with reported excellent results.
 
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