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I found this on page 133 in the owner's manual for the Quadrifoglio:

Before switching the engine off, keep it
idling for a few minutes so that the
turbocharger can be suitably lubricated.
This procedure is particularly
recommended after severe driving.

After a full load operation, keep the
engine idling for three to five minutes
before switching it off.

This time allows the lubricating oil and
the engine coolant to eliminate the
excessive heat from combustion
chamber, bearings, inner components
and turbocharger.

Are any of the current Quadrifoglio owners doing a prolonged cool down like this?
 

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Let's keep in mind that the owner's manual is written for the lowest common denominator.

Notice it's primarily talking about severe driving and full load operation. For example, if you run the car at full boost those turbos get spinning up to 3000 revolutions per SECOND. Of course if you immediately stop and shut off the engine that turbos are still spinning and with no oil pressure, turbo life will be shortened. Now that's a worst case scenario, and in that case you should certainly let it idle for a few minutes before shutting it off.

If you drive off boost like a normal human being in the last couple mins before you shut off the engine the turbo will have had time to cool off and slow down. In practice this is what almost everyone does without thinking. For example when you pull into your neighborhood or the mall parking lot, you are probably staying off boost and at low rpm for a few minutes anyway. In that case, it's fine to just shut off the engine because the turbos are not spinning above idle speed anyway.

Greg
 

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Don't know about the 2.9 engine but the 2.0 has after run cooling.

"The 2.0 GME has two completely separate cooling circuits: the high temperature loop feeds the engine block and head, engine oil, low pressure EGR and cabin heater, and the low temperature one cools the intercooler and turbo. The HT circuit has a belt-driven pump, while the LT one has an electric pump. Both loops have electronic bypass valves rather than conventional thermostats"
 

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any FI car I've had I have always let cool down after any type of high boost driving (ie; track days)...even after some spirited driving..you usually come back down to "normal" and that alone should temper the turbos....in the driveway I let the car run for maybe a minute or two and thats about it.
 

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Honestly, this is nothing new and is likely listed in almost all Manufacturers manuals for cars coming with Turbos. Even if not in a manual , this is a solid recommendation from any individual who has tracked or driven a turbocharged car over the years, so do not deem it a problem with the Giulia, it is just good common sense.
 

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Don't know about the 2.9 engine but the 2.0 has after run cooling.

"The 2.0 GME has two completely separate cooling circuits: the high temperature loop feeds the engine block and head, engine oil, low pressure EGR and cabin heater, and the low temperature one cools the intercooler and turbo. The HT circuit has a belt-driven pump, while the LT one has an electric pump. Both loops have electronic bypass valves rather than conventional thermostats"
Please remember that this is after run cooling, not oiling. It won't prevent damage if the turbo is still spinning like crazy with no oil pressure.

Greg
 

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I'm very surprised that this warning applies for a contemporary consumer vehicle, even with a high performance engine, now that automotive turbos are a very mature technology and most in performance cars, water-cooled. Coking the oil in turbos should not be a concern in today's engines. If critical, the protection should be programmed into the ECU with thermo sensing in the turbo to detect when its necessary. The warning in the manual could provide a potential "out" for Alfa warranty coverage for the QF turbos. They only need to claim that misuse by the owner caused the turbos to overheat. No such warning in the manual for my Cayenne Turbo. And I note that the turbos aren't covered in the long-term emissions system warranty as they have been in other turbo cars I owned.
 

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I find that this is pretty easy in practice; park, turn off the stereo, shut off the fan, check messages, take off my sunglasses and gather my things before getting out of the car. That's usually a minute at least and then I shut it down. I've always done this with turbocharged cars and have never had a problem with the turbos.
 

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I find that this is pretty easy in practice; park, turn off the stereo, shut off the fan, check messages, take off my sunglasses and gather my things before getting out of the car. That's usually a minute at least and then I shut it down. I've always done this with turbocharged cars and have never had a problem with the turbos.
Looking to purchase a Ti with sport pack etc and saw a few at our last AR meeting. Like just about everything except the exhaust sound. When will Centerline introduce a exhaust for the Ti which will sound like a Abarth or even better a 4C for a reasonable price.
 

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I'm very surprised that this warning applies for a contemporary consumer vehicle, even with a high performance engine, now that automotive turbos are a very mature technology and most in performance cars, water-cooled. Coking the oil in turbos should not be a concern in today's engines. If critical, the protection should be programmed into the ECU with thermo sensing in the turbo to detect when its necessary. The warning in the manual could provide a potential "out" for Alfa warranty coverage for the QF turbos. They only need to claim that misuse by the owner caused the turbos to overheat. No such warning in the manual for my Cayenne Turbo. And I note that the turbos aren't covered in the long-term emissions system warranty as they have been in other turbo cars I owned.
Every turbo engine in the world, can be seen "red" after having serious fun with it. It's only about that... wait until is not so hot. An usual recomendation in every turbo car I've had.
 
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