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Just had a foot of snow dump in Minnesota. Q4 Performed flawlessly on the way home when many other vehicles were getting stuck. Really great traction in soft snow. Rear biased handling...All this has been discussed on other forms before.

This a.m. my cul-de-sac was not plowed and we had about 8 inches to 10 inches of heavy snow and a fairly steep uphill drive. Decided to leave the truck for my wife to take to work and give the Alfa a try. I got stuck! Basically the combination of soft snow and the underside of the car Beached on it. In A mode the traction control will not let you get above 2000 RPM so you can’t spin through the soft snow to move forward. It took me a couple of minutes to figure out if I switch to D mode I could really rev her to almost 6000 rpms with all four wheels spinning get unmoored. Further up the road where there was more really heavy snow I used the same technique and found the D mode is the real Adverse conditions champion.

My car does not have the limited slip differential. So I don’t know how that might behave differently. Appreciate your comments and other people’s experiences.
 

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You didn't mention the two most important words in your tale...winter tires. If you didn't have them, go get them. All seasons = No seasons.
Winter tires, summers, all seasons, tires are not going to matter if the snow is deep enough to pack under the car and cause it to float or high center.
 

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You didn't mention the two most important words in your tale...winter tires. If you didn't have them, go get them. All seasons = No seasons.
Winter tires, summers, all seasons, tires are not going to matter if the snow is deep enough to pack under the car and cause it to float or high center.
I have never seen a car float on snow. I have however plowed through deep snow on many occasions and snow tires definitely help. For anything other than an epic snow fall that might cause your car to float. snow tires are the way to go.
 

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Thanks for the tip Rumifaizer! I do have the Ti Performance Package and the worst I've had to drive through was about 6 inches of new powder. I had it in N mode and it motored through it like a champ, but if I have the conditions you mentioned, it's good to know what to do to begin with to avoid getting stuck in the first place.

We've had a very weird winter this season. Temps have been down in the 20's at night pretty consistently for almost 2 months, but we only had snow for about a week and a half starting the day before Christmas. It's been a cold but very dry winter so far. Everything is frozen over and icy in the morning, which is more dangerous than snow, but even that doesn't seem to bother the Giulia. For such a gorgeous sports sedan, it's been a remarkably capable winter car too. Oh and I'm on my winter set of wheels with Blizzak WS80 tires which most certainly helps.
 

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The air dam's height seems to be close to the car's ground clearance. I guess it's not that efficient at plowing.
 
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I suppose it's a matter of opinion, but in southern MA, I would characterize the weather as "no season", and hence prefer all season tires.

typically a big snowfall is cleared quite quickly, followed by salt dust covered roads, and then rain.
all seasons have managed the snow events well enough.

floating? yeah, a long time ago I had to push a spitfire for miles down a country road, because the snow tires weren't able to grab anything but fluff.
 

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I suppose it's a matter of opinion, but in southern MA, I would characterize the weather as "no season", and hence prefer all season tires.

typically a big snowfall is cleared quite quickly, followed by salt dust covered roads, and then rain.
all seasons have managed the snow events well enough.
The same could be said for where I and many others live, with two exceptions:
1. One can't always wait for roads to be cleared completely
2. The need to deal with blowing snow and re-freeze in the days following the storm

I probably only need snow tires for 10-20 days during the winter, but during some of those days I really need them.
 
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floating? yeah, a long time ago I had to push a spitfire for miles down a country road, because the snow tires weren't able to grab anything but fluff.
I haven’t seen a Spitfire in ages but what do they weigh? 1500lbs? I could see a really light car having traction issues and acting like a toboggan on top of snow but I don’t think Giulia’s are quite so svelte :wink2:

I’m firmly in the winter tire camp if you have any interest in taking the car out in bad conditions even if only occasionally.

My plan for my Quadrifoglio which also makes some sense for other Giulia’s because they are all fun to drive when the weather is nice to begin with is as follows:

If you’re going to change out tires for potential snow conditions it makes more sense to put on nice high performance summer tires for 3/4 of the year, to get the maximum enjoyment out of the car for the majority of the year, and put actual winter tires on December—>February. It does two things: peace of mind for almost any conditions and secondly it saves a few months of wear on the invariably softer wearing summer tires, an understatement for the QV’s Corsa’s...

I currently drive a Audi S3 equipped with summer pirellis which are great in good weather but are pretty useless in the snow even with the AWD...
 

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Switch to manual mode in D and play around with the gears. If all fails...

1. Release air pressure from tires 5+ psi and give it another go
2. Take all four of your floor mats and put them behind your wheels facing the rear bumper. Since it's rear biased, reverse your way over the floor mats and hopefully somewhere the car can move on it's own. DO NOT punch the gas or else you'll see your floor mats fly!
3. Get snow tires :) They're not designed to prevent cars from floating on snow BUT they are designed to move snow out of your way and get better traction
 
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I had my wife's Subaru Crosstrek XV floating on snow during our epic drought, although it did not get stuck. It did stall once or twice but some persistence got it moving again. This was in my rather steep driveway (20-25% grade) in Walker California. I should have taken pictures of the tracks in the snow including the skid plate drag marks. It was the only time I have heard the audio traction control alarm come on in that vehicle.

Regarding "plowing" the snow, I found that the differentials of my pickup truck really do not work like a plow at all! With just enough slushy snow during the 2017 melt of the record setting snowfall on more-or-less flat ground that it would pile up in front of the differential (about the same depth as the Crosstrek floated over), my truck refused to move forward. I ended up getting dragged out by with help from the CHP, otherwise it would have been 3 hours with a shovel.

OEM all seasons on the Crosstrek, horrible commercial truck tires with a M&S rating on the truck (long story).

Anyway, hopefully Giulia will behave more like the Crosstrek than the anchor-like truck. Giulia and Crosstrek are similar in size and weight and both have a smooth underside. Now if AR would just deliver my car...
 

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It would be interesting to see whether snow "plowed" by a Giulia broke or dislodged its front fascia before barricading the car.

I looked up Walker out of curiosity and was reminded of the high desert town where the movie "Tremors" was set.
 
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It would be interesting to see whether snow "plowed" by a Giulia broke or dislodged its front fascia before barricading the car..
. No more taking a run at the bottom of the driveway after the plow has come around. But for normal drivijg I doubt any of us will be plowing though anything deep or hard enough to cause any damage.
 

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Thanks for the tip Rumifaizer! I do have the Ti Performance Package and the worst I've had to drive through was about 6 inches of new powder. I had it in N mode and it motored through it like a champ, but if I have the conditions you mentioned, it's good to know what to do to begin with to avoid getting stuck in the first place.

We've had a very weird winter this season. Temps have been down in the 20's at night pretty consistently for almost 2 months, but we only had snow for about a week and a half starting the day before Christmas. It's been a cold but very dry winter so far. Everything is frozen over and icy in the morning, which is more dangerous than snow, but even that doesn't seem to bother the Giulia. For such a gorgeous sports sedan, it's been a remarkably capable winter car too. Oh and I'm on my winter set of wheels with Blizzak WS80 tires which most certainly helps.
Much better than last year when all the Onion Sheds and other roof were falling in from the heavy snow and ice down there.
 

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It would be interesting to see whether snow "plowed" by a Giulia broke or dislodged its front fascia before barricading the car.

I looked up Walker out of curiosity and was reminded of the high desert town where the movie "Tremors" was set.
Actually, I did have to check the film location of Tremors to see if it was very close by (not really). Walker is the local growing town (now population 650, the 2000 census was 500), largely driven by increased staffing at the US Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center. Some silver mining, one guy trying to reopen an old gold mine, agriculture, and recreational activities too.

Walker is perhaps famous due to this film clip. At the start of the video the plane is more-or-less over my house:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2002_United_States_airtanker_crashes


Q4 is less nose down than the RWD 2.0T model. I wonder if that was done specifically to reduce the chance of damage to the fascia/air dam in the snow?

Curiously QV is less nose down than any version of the 2.0T.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You didn't mention the two most important words in your tale...winter tires. If you didn't have them, go get them. All seasons = No seasons.
Absolutely true. I have Sotozero 3 winter tires on the 17 in wheels Eagle 7 first recommended. I do think that they are less good for raw winter weather group than nlizzaks but I bought them because off the reviews of their performance nature and I do think that they are better in the dry than the stock all season pirelli run flats. My main point was just to highlight that if you guys get stuck because the car won't let you rev high in A mode just switch to D: defeats the slip sensors.

Thanks
 

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Walker is perhaps famous due to this film clip. At the start of the video the plane is more-or-less over my house.
Sad that the crew perished. Glad your home (occupied at the time?) was spared.

Q4 is less nose down than the RWD 2.0T model. I wonder if that was done specifically to reduce the chance of damage to the fascia/air dam in the snow?

Curiously QV is less nose down than any version of the 2.0T.
Is that with the splitter retracted?
 

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Driving a car this low in 8-10 inches of snow is probably how this happened. There isn't much to this

Buy a small shovel, it happened to me once. TCS systems definitely aren't helping in these situations that's for sure
 

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Sad that the crew perished. Glad your home (occupied at the time?) was spared.
That particular plane had been retired by the military and given to the national guard, then retired by the national guard and given to the fire guys (not sure of the organization). Then these guys load the worn out plane to the max with fire retardant and do aerobatics in it. That practice of equipping fire fighters with worn out equipment was ended due to this specific crash. There is a roadside memorial at the crash site.

Anyway, I didn't own the house at the time. My house was saved from the fire largely because the next door neighbor (now passed away, I got this info from his widow) used his garden tractor to cut a 1+ mile long fire break around the neighborhood. The fire break is still visible in satellite photos and has become a popular hiking trail.

Is that with the splitter retracted?
If you look you will see that the rear is higher than the front by a lot in a RWD 2.0T and moderately in a Q4, but the QV sits "flat". This shows up pretty clearly in the entry and exit angle specs for the various models. Of course if you lift the rear up, the front noses down. QV nose height and RWD 2.0T nose height are about the same even though the rest of the QV sits lower; by "nose down" I mean the angle, not the ground clearance.
 
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