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Just had a snapshot taken to see for fun what stock alignment looks like. Definitely room for aggressive development. I will be running -3.0 All around come racing season.

 

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Camber is the top of the tire in relation to the bottom. If the tire is angled so the top is pushed in, that's negative camber and offers more grip in the turns. -3 is usually about to most you can go before it starts having less grip. Excessive camber will cause excessive tire wear.

Tow, or toe, it the leading edge of the tire as compared to the trailing edge. If the front of the tires are point IN towards each other, this is called toe-in. If the they're pointed out and away from each other, this is called toe-out. In general, tow-out is a bad thing and causes an unstable feeling at high speeds. The vehicle wants to wander. A very small amount of toe-in is ideal. Excessive tow will cause excessive tire wear.

Caster, is a measurement that we can't see with our eyes like excessive camber and toe. It's a measurement of ... well ... uhm ...
What castor does is allow the wheel to track in a straight line. A shopping cart has wheels that follow the cart and turn to always go the same direction of the cart.

It's castor that allows you to take you hands off the steering wheel and the car stays straight. If you're turning a corner, and take your hands off the wheel, it is castor is what causes the car to straighten by itself. Not enough castor and the car want's to change lanes by itself. To much castor and the steering wheel is very heavy.

It takes time, just like anything else, to learn to read an alignment chart. In this setting we want to make sure the alignment adjustment is where Alfa says it should be.
 

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I had my car aligned just to verify that it was "correct" from the factory and I'm happy to report that it was almost exactly like kanundrum's. I've had Porsche's in the past that were all over place. The only change I decided to make was moving the front toe to zero.
 

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What would you gentleman recommend as a good starting point for better handling? However I think the steering is super sharp as is and dint want it anymore aggressive.
Tire wear is not a concern for me.
Giulia Ti AWD square setup.
 

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You can only adjust toe. Front camber is fixed, and rear camber falls where it falls depending on toe and can't be independently altered.

In my opinion:
Stock front toe settings provide a good balance between stability on highways and turn-in response.
Rear toe settings I'm undecided as haven't put enough track days on the car yet and I don't trail brake on the road.

In my opinion it needs more camber but you won't get this without modification.
 

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When I get mine I'll leave it stock.... well maybe I'll just make toe in slightly positive....
Otherwise why mess with perfection?
 

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Right, and AlfaLink? Does the Quad have adjustable coilovers?
 

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It feels like the electronic settings (soft, mid, race) don't just alter damping stiffness but also change the ratio of damping from front to rear.

In Mid setting, the damping on my QV feels extremely refined at fast road speeds, a very "flat ride" - car goes up and down as a whole rather than the front going up and down independently from the rear (like a boat). Yet in turns, it feels neutral. It is quite unusual to have this quality of ride and neutral cornering performance in a production car out of the box.
 

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2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
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You can only adjust toe. Front camber is fixed, and rear camber falls where it falls depending on toe and can't be independently altered.

In my opinion:
Stock front toe settings provide a good balance between stability on highways and turn-in response.
Rear toe settings I'm undecided as haven't put enough track days on the car yet and I don't trail brake on the road.

In my opinion it needs more camber but you won't get this without modification.
The front camber is normally adjusted by putting in an adjustable top bracket on the struts.
"I read on the internet" that vehicles without a large down force (like F1 race cars) do not need more than -1 degrees of Camber. Maybe that only applies to sports cars with very stiff suspension? I would think the amount of body roll would be a factor in this determination.

Is the rear toe adjustable? I've never seen a vehicle an adjuster for the rear toe.

FWIW: my "salvage" Jag E-type, replete with front toe set by me using a stick came out with nothing more than 0.1 degrees out of spec. I suppose it helps that the Jag has a separate frame for the rear suspension. Maybe just luck with the front toe...
 

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"I read on the internet" that vehicles without a large down force (like F1 race cars) do not need more than -1 degrees of Camber. Maybe that only applies to sports cars with very stiff suspension? I would think the amount of body roll would be a factor in this determination.
I set it according to tyre temps (inner, middle and outer) and tyre wear.

Is the rear toe adjustable? I've never seen a vehicle an adjuster for the rear toe.
Yes
 

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For street use, you don't need or want much camber.

On the track, camber is adjusted based on tire temp readings. For optimal traction, you want an even temperature across the tire. Camber and air pressure are key here. This is the sort of thing that can change with tire brands, track of the day, ambient air temp, etc, etc...

Generally, we're talking about 2 or 3 degrees front and less than 2 degrees rear. Too much camber has the same effect as to little camber, sometimes to much is worse that to little.


Toe is important. The driving forces try to push the front tires out (toe-out). At rest, you want just a bit of toe-in. Not much, about 1/16 to 1/8 inch. The idea here is that the forward motion will bring the tires to zero toe.

Toe-out will cause the car to wander or self steer. Auto-crossers tend to like toe-out claiming it helps with turn-in. I'm not an auto crosser, so I don't have first hand knowledge/experience.
 

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I got this from Alfa Romeo customer service. This is a copy and paste, no modifciation from me :O

[FONT=&quot]Thank you for contacting Alfa Romeo.

Further to your enquiry with regarding technical information for you Giulia Quadrifoglio Verde, please find the figures below:
(1) The specified torque for the wheel bolts is 10.8 – 13.2 daNm.
(2) Wheel Alignment specifications are as follows -
(a) For towing: 0 degrees plus or minus 4 degrees
(b) For Caster: + 6 degrees plus or minus 18 degrees
(c) For Camber: - 35 degrees plus or minus 20 degrees

Should you require any further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact our Customer Relations Team from Monday to Friday between 09:00 and 18:00 and Saturday from 08:00 until 17:00, on 00800 2532 0000 choosing option number 3.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Not sure the if ultra stanced look would suit the Giulia.
Does the diffuser need to be removed to fit a tow bar?
And... they refer to it as the Giulia Quadrifoglio Verde.

[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
 

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(c) For Camber: - 35 degrees plus or minus 20 degrees

Like this????






 

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That's nothing like the head tech at my dealership said or showed me! And I took a snapshot of the computer screen from the service manual.
Camber -.50 to +.33

Maybe they sent you the specs for a Giulietta set up for Tijuana?
 

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A simple "band-aid" improvement for gaining some negative camber up front could be camber bolts. Does anyone have any insight to any being produced? Event another -0.25 degrees will be noticeable.
 

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6.4 deg of caster stock. That's a healthy number and you can think of it as dynamic camber. Suspension design and geometry is important for deciding on alignment. Alfa link Double wishbone and multi link suspension like this car has give favorable tire roll center. Long story short, lots of static camber should not be needed unless racing slick tires are used. Lowering the car will give more static camber and a higher spring rate will reduce roll.

You want to know why F1 cars need such little static camber? Push rod suspension geometry. It's kind of off topic here but there are good reads from a Google search.

I have not looked closely yet but I don't think this car uses camber bolts based on the design. Camber bolts are generally used for McPherson strut setups which do not apply here.
 

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That's nothing like the head tech at my dealership said or showed me! And I took a snapshot of the computer screen from the service manual.
Camber -.50 to +.33

Maybe they sent you the specs for a Giulietta set up for Tijuana?
More like for Shinuku Ku in Tokyo:)
 
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