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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
is it possible to change the standard Steel Brakes to CCB Brakes? I have heard needs to be change many parts to get to the CCB Brakes?
 

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is it possible to change the standard Steel Brakes to CCB Brakes? I have heard needs to be change many parts to get to the CCB Brakes?
Of course it is possible.

I don't know if it is allowed to post these links here - but in Germany there is a company who offers a full kit for a change.
They want 7000,- EUR for it; round about 8200$ incl. 19% vat, without shipping costs.


Best regards
Waldek
 

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Of course it is possible.

I don't know if it is allowed to post these links here - but in Germany there is a company who offers a full kit for a change.
They want 7000,- EUR for it; round about 8200$ incl. 19% vat, without shipping costs.


Best regards
Waldek
The 19% VAT should drop out, call it $6650 charged by the German company...but then you get U.S. Import Duty, which would probably be between 0% and 2.5% (2015 HTSA Chapter 87), depending upon what the recent G-7 meeting spat does to tariffs.
 
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Might want to factor in the cost of upgrading to SS brakes lines if you’re going through the trouble to upgrade everything else while you’re at it too...
 

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is it possible to change the standard Steel Brakes to CCB Brakes? I have heard needs to be change many parts to get to the CCB Brakes?

My two-cents ...


Besides looking nice, for me, I would want to weigh pros and cons.


On the plus side, CCM brakes ...

  • Less or no fade when hot. Great plus if you live in mountainous area or you track the car
  • Consistent hard braking ... good if you track your car
  • Treated reasonably well (e.g.., not a lot of tracking), they last a long time. Maybe even as long as you have the car.
  • They look cool.
On the negative side, CCM brakes ...

  • Cost a lot more than steel brakes to purchase and to service
  • You can never resurface the rotors. In fact, you need to weigh the rotors to determine if they need replacing.
  • Rotors are more fragile than steel rotors. Be careful mounting the wheels you don't bang the rotor.
  • When they are cold, they do not brake as well as steel brakes.
  • With some CCM brakes, it is not uncommon that they squeal
Bottom line ... and this is me saying ... if you are using your car as a daily driver with little or no track time, stick with steel. In my case, with more than 99% of my time on the street, I would not opt for CCM brakes.


Steve
 

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My two-cents ...


Besides looking nice, for me, I would want to weigh pros and cons.


On the plus side, CCM brakes ...

  • Less or no fade when hot. Great plus if you live in mountainous area or you track the car
  • Consistent hard braking ... good if you track your car
  • Treated reasonably well (e.g.., not a lot of tracking), they last a long time. Maybe even as long as you have the car.
  • They look cool.
On the negative side, CCM brakes ...

  • Cost a lot more than steel brakes to purchase and to service
  • You can never resurface the rotors. In fact, you need to weigh the rotors to determine if they need replacing.
  • Rotors are more fragile than steel rotors. Be careful mounting the wheels you don't bang the rotor.
  • When they are cold, they do not brake as well as steel brakes.
  • With some CCM brakes, it is not uncommon that they squeal
Bottom line ... and this is me saying ... if you are using your car as a daily driver with little or no track time, stick with steel. In my case, with more than 99% of my time on the street, I would not opt for CCM brakes.


Steve
Left out, you probably know better than me, the CCM’s eliminate lots and lots of brake dust. It’s a relatively small thing but think of all the wheel cleaner and elbow grease you’d save over the years! Still the CCM’s are really pricey and limited usefulness in a daily driver but if money is not a huge consideration they are a pretty nice luxury...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Other than the brakes, which part I need to be swap? I heard there is some parts also need to be change to able to fit the ceramic brakes...
 

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Left out, you probably know better than me, the CCM’s eliminate lots and lots of brake dust. It’s a relatively small thing but think of all the wheel cleaner and elbow grease you’d save over the years! Still the CCM’s are really pricey and limited usefulness in a daily driver but if money is not a huge consideration they are a pretty nice luxury...
Yes. I forgot about brake dust. The are much cleaner in that respect.

Steve
 

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My two-cents ...


Besides looking nice, for me, I would want to weigh pros and cons.


On the plus side, CCM brakes ...

  • Less or no fade when hot. Great plus if you live in mountainous area or you track the car
  • Consistent hard braking ... good if you track your car
  • Treated reasonably well (e.g.., not a lot of tracking), they last a long time. Maybe even as long as you have the car.
  • They look cool.
On the negative side, CCM brakes ...

  • Cost a lot more than steel brakes to purchase and to service
  • You can never resurface the rotors. In fact, you need to weigh the rotors to determine if they need replacing.
  • Rotors are more fragile than steel rotors. Be careful mounting the wheels you don't bang the rotor.
  • When they are cold, they do not brake as well as steel brakes.
  • With some CCM brakes, it is not uncommon that they squeal
Bottom line ... and this is me saying ... if you are using your car as a daily driver with little or no track time, stick with steel. In my case, with more than 99% of my time on the street, I would not opt for CCM brakes.


Steve
I'll throw one more possible con in there...resale value at higher mileage. The closer you get to that $10k brake job, the more weary used-market buyers will be and that is definitely gonna be taken into consideration when determining what the car's worth at resale. If the seller is asking say $70k, but the brakes are gonna need to be done in the next year or two, buyer is probably only gonna be willing to pay $60k if you get what I mean. Now this isn't an issue with higher end super cars because $10k-$20k on a quarter million dollar car isnt really anything notable. But put that on a $70k car, that's well over at least 10% the value of the car. Just something to keep in mind if you plan on having the car for a longer time.
 

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Yes. I forgot about brake dust. The are much cleaner in that respect.

Steve
1000 miles and not a bit of dust. I have not had to clean my calipers or wheels other than the dust from the air to the wheels. They were also ceramic coated so not sure if that makes a difference. There was a Blue QV in the shop when I arrived (likely a no wash stamp) because it was leaving and the yellow calipers were filthy. I was like okay maybe there is a bit of a benefit that I didn't think was a big deal but is because I keep the QV sparkling clean which in Arizona with no rain or snow that is really not a whole lot of work. We highly doubt we will be driving in rain as there are the other cars to use for that. Aside from that I have not seen the ceramics get that rust thing going on like I see on the Ti Sport brakes. That could be a casualty of all steel brakes but I think it would be super ugly on this car. Now I know why cars with steel brakes cover up as much of the rotor as possible. My MINI has fine spoke and you can hardly see the rotor but I did look through when cleaning the wheels and I realized they had that rusty thing going on to.
 

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All cast iron rotors rust. Here in the Northeast when you put your car away after driving in the rain especially and leave it a few days in the garage your rotors will be covered in a rusty patina. On the street you never see it because as soon as you drive it again the pads polish them up and they get the normal polished look. They in fact are literally polished every time you hit the brakes. You’re lucky if you live where rotors never get a coating of corrosion lol!
 

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Yes you're right. My fault.

I could not imagine why doing it the other way... :wink2:


Best regards
Waldek
In the Ferrari community, on F430, many have converted CCB to iron because the cost to replace CCB is astronomical and for normal street driving iron rotors work fine.

Steve
 

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Yes, this is what i understand.
I don't understand why people want to do it the opposite way especially when CCBs are optional....


Best regards
Waldek

Ahh, yes. I was confusing myself. I do that a lot these days.



I guess maybe for the person who buys it second-hand. I dunno. My understanding is that if you don't severely abuse CCB's they are likely to last the life of the car. I do not personally have any experience with them, so cannot say.


Steve
 
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