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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there any way to easily identify threads I am participating in? Maybe by sorting based on my recent participation? This would preferably be across the various sub-forums so I had one page of all threads I have commented in? Thanks.
 

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can also do an advanced search on your username
Which leads me to ask about its origin. South Pole temperature and latitude, perhaps?
 

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Good guess. I worked as a consultant for the US Antarctic Program for a couple of years, both at South Pole and McMurdo Station.
Very cool. I visit them often, via their webcams, and a friend stopped by Palmer last year. The closest I've been is Port Lockroy (a nice spot for a quick dip), though I've seen the C-130s in Christchurch. No Alfas that I'm aware of on the White Continent. May I ask what your field is?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Very cool. I visit them often, via their webcams, and a friend stopped by Palmer last year. The closest I've been is Port Lockroy (a nice spot for a quick dip), though I've seen the C-130s in Christchurch. No Alfas that I'm aware of on the White Continent. May I ask what your field is?
Well the Italians do have a base, Concordia, so maybe. I was Occupational Safety and Health. Not a researcher, but one of the people that kept the base running for the researchers. I wintered at South Pole in 2010 - that was an experience. Coldest temperature during my winter was -104F. That's 5 degrees above the temperature at which carbon dioxide precipitates out of air as snow.
 

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Well the Italians do have a base, Concordia, so maybe. I was Occupational Safety and Health. Not a researcher, but one of the people that kept the base running for the researchers. I wintered at South Pole in 2010 - that was an experience. Coldest temperature during my winter was -104F. That's 5 degrees above the temperature at which carbon dioxide precipitates out of air as snow.
Populations that use the words summer and winter as verbs are elite groups. Was 2010 one of the years when someone was airlifted out midwinter?

Balmy day at the pole. Only -59F https://www.usap.gov/videoclipsandmaps/spWebCam.cfm There have been a couple of days recently when the wind-chill was down around -100F. Of course it's only March.
 

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at the top of the screen there is a bar that will say "Welcome 90Below" you will see the word Subscriptions....clicking on that will give you a list of all the threads you are subscribed too.
buggered if i can find it

i can see Welcome, Papa Gallo
Or try 'Total Posts' under 'Statistics' in your profile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Winter 2011 the station manager at SP wanted to be rescued mid-winter and the NSF refused. It is extremely dangerous for the rescue pilots who fly small twin-engine Otters that can handle those cold temperatures. There was a big internal kerfuffle about it, but the general feeling among Polies is that when you take a winter-over assignment you know the risks and you don't ask others to risk their lives for you.

In 2012 they did do a mid-winter rescue but the situation was more dire. The logistics to do a mid-winter rescue are incredible and the risk is significant. The planes have to fly from Canada to the tip of South America, do an ocean crossing and land at a coastal base base mid-winter. They then proceed across Antarctica to the SP, landing at fuel caches pre-positioned on the ice so they can hand-pump fuel from 55-gallon drums they have to dig out of the snow. Remember this is all done in darkness at -80 to -90F and usually in terrible weather. After picking up the patient at SP they fly on to McMurdo to meet a larger plane that ALSO flew down from Greenland via the Pacific route which takes the patient on to New Zealand. They leave the Otters at McMurdo for the rest of the winter because it is too dangerous to fly them out.
 

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Evacuations in 1999 (the station doctor) and 2016 (two crew members) as well if I recall correctly.
The pole is an unforgiving place under the best conditions. Even Buzz Aldrin had a tough time.
 
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