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Discussion Starter #81 (Edited)
Do you have a source for aluminum hat 2-piece rotors that are an OEM replacement? Even if you stick with the stock brakes, I'd recommend at the very least you upgrade the brake fluid to a DOT4 grade; Motul RBF 600 is pretty popular with the weekend track crowd. You might cook your factory brakes, but you won't lose pedal pressure. Another good idea is to replace the brake lines at the wheels with stainless steel lines. The may weigh a little more than the rubber ones, but they won't expand with heat which can cause mushy braking.

The P-Zeros are for track guys that consider a set of tires a weekend consumable. Your choice of Michelin's is probably the best for your application, unless you want to have just a summer set of wheels and tires.
Yep, the brake fluid upgrade is a relatively cheap bit of "insurance" for spirited driving. Where I drive loss of brake power == "die now" since missing a turn means either running into a cliff or flying off of a cliff.

$$ brake lines are less clear if they are a worthwhile change. I had them on my E-type and they sure look good, but you cannot tell by physical inspection if the lining inside of an $$ line is deteriorating. With rubber lines there will usually be some soft spots apparent before they fail. OTOH, $$ lines seem less likely to be damaged by road debris. I was told that mushy braking has more to do with the brake fluid than the brake lines.

For me the point with the Michelin A/S 3+ is that they are all seasons with near summer tire performance. I need all seasons since summer nights are often cold high in the mountains. I don't think any of the competition comes close.

I do not know of a source for 2 piece rotors for Giulia 2.0T at this time. Stoptech makes something that is close and I am hoping they can be convinced to make a kit that will fit. They seem to be much more interested in promoting their "big brake" kits with the 2 piece rotors which typically yield larger diameter brakes for about the OEM weight. One downside with a big brake kit besides the risk of upsetting the Nannies is that clearance to the rim is reduced. CF rims are heat sensitive so more clearance between the rim and the brake is a good thing.

Interestingly, an Etype has 0 unsprung rear brake weight: the brakes are mounted on the sides of the differential. I was told that some Corvettes have this arrangement as well. The problem with this scheme is that the rear brake cooling is poor.
 

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Discussion Starter #85
All of them. The OEM fluid is Petronas Tutela Brake Fluid Extreme HT.

All FCA products (at least the ones originating from the Fiat side of the operation) use DOT4 fluid from the factory, from the cheapest 69hp Fiat Panda and up.
Thanks. Compared to Motul RBF 600, Petronas Tutela Extreme HT seems to have slightly inferior high temp properties, but significantly superior low temp properties. I had not thought before to check the low temp properties of brake fluid. Too bad they don't give a viscosity versus temp curve, but extreme lows in Eastern California of around -30F seems to be pushing the usability limit of either of these fluids (the lowest I have driven in was -10F, I think a common winter low in the mid-west USA). I don't think either fluid will work on a cold winter night in Minnesota, Canada, or Alaska.
 

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Thanks. Compared to Motul RBF 600, Petronas Tutela Extreme HT seems to have slightly inferior high temp properties, but significantly superior low temp properties. I had not thought before to check the low temp properties of brake fluid. Too bad they don't give a viscosity versus temp curve, but extreme lows in Eastern California of around -30F seems to be pushing the usability limit of either of these fluids (the lowest I have driven in was -10F, I think a common winter low in the mid-west USA). I don't think either fluid will work on a cold winter night in Minnesota, Canada, or Alaska.
The owner's manual recommends using the engine block heater for ambient temperatures below 0F. It is required for temperatures below -20F. I wonder whether the car can detect whether it is not plugged in and refuse to spin the starter.

My car's window sticker says it has a block heater, but I have not been able to find the cord. Another item for next week's service. I admit I'm not particularly looking forward to opening and closing my hood on the coldest days of the winter.
 

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Discussion Starter #88
The owner's manual recommends using the engine block heater for ambient temperatures below 0F. It is required for temperatures below -20F. I wonder whether the car can detect whether it is not plugged in and refuse to spin the starter.

My car's window sticker says it has a block heater, but I have not been able to find the cord. Another item for next week's service. I admit I'm not particularly looking forward to opening and closing my hood on the coldest days of the winter.
But an engine block heater seems unlikely to warm the brake fluid significantly. -20F seems a bit extreme to require a block heater just to protect the engine. Perhaps due to an abundance of caution? Maybe there are some parts clearance issues so that the issue is that the engine should not be cranked unless it is above -20F? Most fluids are good to -40F, with the [email protected]#$ing windshield washer fluid rules in California being the obvious exception (I buy my WW fluid in Nevada).

Maybe MacGeek knows where to find the cord for your block heater?

Batteries need freeze protection, but Giulia's battery is certain to get no heat from from an engine block heater:
Fully discharged freezing point: about 30F
40% charge freezing point: about -20F
Fully charged freezing point: about -70F
I know from experience, a frozen battery is worse than just an inconvenience. If the case ruptures the acid spills and goes all over the place.

FWIW: A Hummer tire inflation system "reliably" fails at about -10F. I stepped out of a motel room on a brisk morning in Bridgeport Ca to find the "neighbors" HumVee sitting on rims.
 

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Maybe MacGeek knows where to find the cord for your block heater?
O/M says the block heater cord access door is located on the passenger side wiper cowl.

FWIW: A Hummer tire inflation system "reliably" fails at about -10F. I stepped out of a motel room on a brisk morning in Bridgeport Ca to find the "neighbors" HumVee sitting on rims.
I guess that's why they aren't used in Antarctica. Warm spring day at McMurdo. No block heater needed. Not even for a Giulia. https://www.usap.gov/videoclipsandmaps/mcmWebCam.cfm
 

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Discussion Starter #90
O/M says the block heater cord access door is located on the passenger side wiper cowl.
You stated that you could not find the cord. Is it not located as stated in the manual? The windshield wiper cowl seems a little exposed for 110 or 220 VAC. The one on my pickup truck is off to the right side of the radiator; it has a cover to protect it when driving and it is "under cover" to use it when parked.

If a "too cold" start defeat mechanism were in place I would think that it would simply look at the oil temp.

I wonder if a fuel powered heating system will become available? Not exactly taking weight off of the car, but much more effective than a simple block heater since coolant circulation gets enabled (or a secondary coolant circulation system added) in order to spread the heat throughout the system. I have such a heater on my pickup truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #92
Just an FYI on inboard rear disc brakes, the Alfetta and Milano also had these, in conjunction with the rear transaxle
Thanks for the history. It is a scheme that works quite well for a street vehicle, but is a serious liability if racing or tracking. Jag eventually made a kit to vent the rear brakes into the trunk and out the trunk lid. Some racers simply used a 2x4 and bungee cord hold the trunk lid open and vent the brakes.
 

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You stated that you could not find the cord. Is it not located as stated in the manual? The windshield wiper cowl seems a little exposed for 110 or 220 VAC. The one on my pickup truck is off to the right side of the radiator; it has a cover to protect it when driving and it is "under cover" to use it when parked.
Maybe just not well enough described for the likes of me. Check the manual yourself, and see what you think. Meanwhile, here's a picture of the area where I have been searching for the cord:
 

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Follow that corrugated conduit. It should lead you to some area in the general vicinity of the other coolant tank, where you should find a bundle of cable.

See attached cable drawing.

 

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Follow that corrugated conduit. It should lead you to some area in the general vicinity of the other coolant tank, where you should find a bundle of cable.

See attached cable drawing.

Will do (when I get my car back from the dealer, where it's receiving 7+ RRTs). Seems I'll be straying from the passenger side wiper cowl.
 
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