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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since some might be curious. Here's how the suspension looks for a base model RWD. I believe the QV will be identical, while the AWD cars might have a different front suspension design.

Front Suspension, sorry for the close ups, these were taken during the spring install. Basically, there's only toe adjustment from the factory:




Rear Suspension, again, no adjustment from the factory except for toe. I imagine a company could redesign the upper control arm to allow camber adjustment, or just use concentric bolts:




You can also see the wheel stud conversion I have, as well as the spacer. The spacer isn't hub centric, but after driving it around for 300miles, there's no vibration.



And might be difficult to see, but here's what a 18x8 +35 wheel wrapped with 245 tires, with a 10mm spacer looks like:


I have 18x8 +35 all around the car, because I hate staggered setups for road cars. Ideally, with a 8" wide wheel, the offset would be +25 all around. A +20 on a 8" wide wheel in the front might be pushing it unless you're into hellastance or whatever -- there is still room in the rear for a more aggressive offset (possibly a +20, or even a +15).


hopes this helps others
 

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2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
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In your first photo, note the doubtful looking ground connector to the right of your circle. The connector appears to be pinched between a painted metal parts. It will only work reliably if the electric connector has sharp teeth that can penetrate the paint.

I suspect that you meant "eccentric bolts" not "concentric bolts" in your discussion above.
 

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Not sure why you highlighted that stuff. The bolt in the first pic is for the anti roll bar linkage, and the one in the second pic is the bottom damper mount, which obviously is not used for toe adjustment, which is done on the tie rods.

In the fourth pic you highlighted, once again, the anti roll bar linkage, and the electrical cable for the brake pad wear sensor. The fifth pic shows a bolt not used for adjustment.

Also, the rear suspension can be adjusted for both toe and camber. Toe is adjusted using the ring nut visible in your third pic to the left, pointing towards the front of the vehicle. Camber is adjusted using the eccentric, clearly visible in your fifth pic to the right, inboard, pointing towards the rear of the car.
 

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Not sure why you highlighted that stuff. The bolt in the first pic is for the anti roll bar linkage, and the one in the second pic is the bottom damper mount, which obviously is not used for toe adjustment, which is done on the tie rods.

In the fourth pic you highlighted, once again, the anti roll bar linkage, and the electrical cable for the brake pad wear sensor. The fifth pic shows a bolt not used for adjustment.

Also, the rear suspension can be adjusted for both toe and camber. Toe is adjusted using the ring nut visible in your third pic to the left, pointing towards the front of the vehicle. Camber is adjusted using the eccentric, clearly visible in your fifth pic to the right, inboard, pointing towards the rear of the car.
Alright, so I'm not the only one that figured something was wrong because I thought I was crazy for a second. :|
 

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@Driven

PM me if you have updated photos and want to change the pictures in the opening post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Seems to be some confusion... the photos I posted with the highlights are just reused photos from the DIY spring thread. Thought that may have been pretty clear since none of those highlighted parts would do anything to change the alignment.

I suspect that you meant "eccentric bolts" not "concentric bolts" in your discussion above.
Correct, my mistake.


Also, the rear suspension can be adjusted for both toe and camber. Toe is adjusted using the ring nut visible in your third pic to the left, pointing towards the front of the vehicle. Camber is adjusted using the eccentric, clearly visible in your fifth pic to the right, inboard, pointing towards the rear of the car.
You're right, I need to edit that so there's no mis-information. I somehow got the fronts/rears mixed up.
 

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OK, so all is well now. For a minute you even had me going with the wheel studs but then you reminded us. Still, these pics are great to see since I didn't see the spring thread. We need more like this.

Thursday, I saw an Acura with wicked rear camber roll past on my way back to work after my dinner break. I burst out laughing as there was only like 2 inches of contact patch on the pavement. It was cool and funny, especially after hearing it approach without looking, with the stereo thumping and then wondering what it would be. Then BOOM, "Hella Stance." :D
 
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I agree with lockem. The ground connector, located on the bracket side of the fastener, attached to what looks like the hub carrier, should use some sort of serrated washer or serrated electric connector. Maye attached to the bolthead side would be better too. Proper plating and maybe dielectric grease would be good, too. Also, the electric parking brake actuator on the rear caliper, gives me pause. I know that it's all the rage these days. I hope that they got it right and that it isn't failure prone. I service a new Land Rover Range Rover Evoque for a friend and its rear parking brakes automatically engage every time the vehicle is turned off. There is a special electronic button pushing sequence to defeat this so that you can work on the rear brakes, or push the vehicle, with the ignition off. Sounds problematic, doesn't it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
In your first photo, note the doubtful looking ground connector to the right of your circle. The connector appears to be pinched between a painted metal parts. It will only work reliably if the electric connector has sharp teeth that can penetrate the paint.
I want to say that's a grounding strap for all of the connections up front, but here is how it's currently assembled is:
1. Stud, connected to the upright / spindle
2. Metal bracket, holds the brake line to the upright / spindle
3. Gray / silver nut
4. Wire connector
5. Black nut, holds the wire connector to assembly
 

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Also, the grommet near the ground lug location is out of place without a home.

I noticed this at the front suspension for the Quadrifoglio's as well. It appears as though the wiring harnesses were engineered to fit one way. Then, through some suspension change along the way, the grommets fromlnt and rear have no home.

In the case of the front Quadrifoglio, it appears as though there was an additional wire harness overlay that did not permit the grommet to fit into its home at the midpoint of the strut tab mounting arrangement.
 

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Ah, it's a stud, not a through-bolt.
Eric, your other comments jogged my memory.
One of the Dealer Techs mentioned to me that he recently saw a technical service bulletin (TSB) about the brake pad sensor wire loom.
I don't remember exactly what he said. Something about them being too short and that one (front or rear) was to be rerouted and the other was to be removed from one of it's clips, so that they would not pull too tight at full wheel travel.
Speaking of TSBs, is there a thread here that collects all TSBs so that our members can view them?
 

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Ah, it's a stud, not a through-bolt.
Eric, your other comments jogged my memory.
One of the Dealer Techs mentioned to me that he recently saw a technical service bulletin (TSB) about the brake pad sensor wire loom.
I don't remember exactly what he said. Something about them being too short and that one (front or rear) was to be rerouted and the other was to be removed from one of it's clips, so that they would not pull too tight at full wheel travel.
Speaking of TSBs, is there a thread here that collects all TSBs so that our members can view them?
Stud = good for electrical ground reliability, but pinching the cable end between painted parts not so much. Note the orange splash on the nut, as if you loosen the nut you void your warranty?
 

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Stud = good for electrical ground reliability, but pinching the cable end between painted parts not so much. Note the orange splash on the nut, as if you loosen the nut you void your warranty?
Voided warranty? I doubt it.
I like to sandwich the wire eye between two freshly sanded surfaces and then either spray, or brush paint or grease over them.
I always wondered why some fasteners were touched by the paint pen, and others not. I always thought that it was some sort of Inspector leaving his / her mark that it was double-checked for proper tightness. On some vehicles it is mostly on the suspension parts. My thinking that it was for parts that if they became loosened and fell off, you might lose control and crash and die. Perhaps with the new Giulia it is used on "safety items", like wiring for the electronic braking or air bags. I use the paint pen a lot on the vehicles that I service. I write the dates on components that I replace: shocks, ball joints, air / oil / cabin filters, etc. I also make match marks when changing timing belts, chains, u-joints, etc. Or things like an arrow to a drain plug on a manual or automatic transmission, and then the date and mileage.
 

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Ah, it's a stud, not a through-bolt.
Eric, your other comments jogged my memory.
One of the Dealer Techs mentioned to me that he recently saw a technical service bulletin (TSB) about the brake pad sensor wire loom.
I don't remember exactly what he said. Something about them being too short and that one (front or rear) was to be rerouted and the other was to be removed from one of it's clips, so that they would not pull too tight at full wheel travel.
Speaking of TSBs, is there a thread here that collects all TSBs so that our members can view them?

Thanks for the heads up on the brake sensor wire length. Next time I have the car on the lift I'll check it out further. Will give the wheel a twist side to side to see the limitations.

If there's any tsb info you come across, we can certainly add it to a sticky thread.

Voided warranty? I doubt it.
I like to sandwich the wire eye between two freshly sanded surfaces and then either spray, or brush paint or grease over them.
I always wondered why some fasteners were touched by the paint pen, and others not. I always thought that it was some sort of Inspector leaving his / her mark that it was double-checked for proper tightness. On some vehicles it is mostly on the suspension parts. My thinking that it was for parts that if they became loosened and fell off, you might lose control and crash and die. Perhaps with the new Giulia it is used on "safety items", like wiring for the electronic braking or air bags. I use the paint pen a lot on the vehicles that I service. I write the dates on components that I replace: shocks, ball joints, air / oil / cabin filters, etc. I also make match marks when changing timing belts, chains, u-joints, etc. Or things like an arrow to a drain plug on a manual or automatic transmission, and then the date and mileage.
I really like the way you think. Marking parts is good business and it really says that I stand behind what I work on. Plus, it beats the heck out of looking up old invoices!
 

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That grounding point is for the brake pad wear sensor.

The wear sensor cable length, measured between the connector and the rubber grommet, must be no less than 320mm long (350mm for the Quadrifoglio).
 
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