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Ok, it looks like there are two different Mopar maximum care policies. One for New cars with less than 3 years / 36K miles and one for Pre-owned cars with more than 3 years. The new car one starts at the service date. The pre-owned one starts at the time that you purchase the warranty. The coverages look about the same.
Ok so if that’s correct it’s possible to buy a used Alfa QV and get a warranty that lasts longer than one available for the one we bought new? That is good and bad. Good as it helps value of our cars on used market but bad as the original owner can’t get a warranty that lasts as long as a used car warranty. 🙁
 

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The warranty I got from clay was from start date of buying the car and 0 miles. I can confirm that the my warranty documentation. My 7 years in total and 85k miles expire in 2025 and I bought the car in 2018
 

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Ok so if that’s correct it’s possible to buy a used Alfa QV and get a warranty that lasts longer than one available for the one we bought new? That is good and bad. Good as it helps value of our cars on used market but bad as the original owner can’t get a warranty that lasts as long as a used car warranty. 🙁
That is indeed strange that you can't get a new car warranty of the same duration as the used car one.
 

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So an update. The pricing is 100% accurate according to Mr. Robbins. So if I purchase the warranty on May 15th 2020 it will run to May 15th 2025 AND I get 60k miles included. Now I feel better, its basically costing me $1019/yr for peace of mind for anything major.
This is as stated in his email to me.
 

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So an update. The pricing is 100% accurate according to Mr. Robbins. So if I purchase the warranty on May 15th 2020 it will run to May 15th 2025 AND I get 60k miles included. Now I feel better, its basically costing me $1019/yr for peace of mind for anything major.
This is as stated in his email to me.
thats a good deal then
 

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So an update. The pricing is 100% accurate according to Mr. Robbins. So if I purchase the warranty on May 15th 2020 it will run to May 15th 2025 AND I get 60k miles included. Now I feel better, its basically costing me $1019/yr for peace of mind for anything major.
This is as stated in his email to me.
totally worth it.
 

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Im looking at extended warranties mainly for time, not miles, after factory warranty expires.
This is an occasional driver not racking up the miles.
Car is 2018 with in service date 10/2018 and has 9K miles.
Looking for max time.
Opinions please.
Just talked to head of Alfa sales at local dealer and he says these cars are reliable.
The Car and Driver car was an anomaly.
I heard it from a different service rep it was mainly because of using throttle and brake at the same time; as on a track to throw the tail out in tight corners.
I'm very confused.
Is this car a time bomb or is it OK ?
 

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Im looking at extended warranties mainly for time, not miles, after factory warranty expires.
This is an occasional driver not racking up the miles.
Car is 2018 with in service date 10/2018 and has 9K miles.
Looking for max time.
Opinions please.
Just talked to head of Alfa sales at local dealer and he says these cars are reliable.
The Car and Driver car was an anomaly.
I heard it from a different service rep it was mainly because of using throttle and brake at the same time; as on a track to throw the tail out in tight corners.
I'm very confused.
Is this car a time bomb or is it OK ?
If you plan on keeping the car you should have a warranty that will at a minimum cover catastrophic expenses (I.e. motor, transmission, etc). Unless something has recently changed Alfa does not perform engine mtce in the us. There are several stories in here about folks who had their engines swapped for what would be considered minor (I.e bad lifter). Engine swap could be as high as 30k. Motor has to come out of car to replace turbos. In short, small issues could cost a lot due to the design of the car. Ferrari had same issues in 80s and 90s with many models requiring engine removal for a major service every 15k miles. Resale on those models has taken a hit based on the high mtce costs. Newer models don’t require engine out services on many of their newer models. The QV motor is also direct injection. 2020 models are direct injection as well as port injection which fixes the carbon buildup issues 17s-19s will eventually have once they get to higher miles. Long way of saying I wouldn’t own the car without a warranty. My 2 cents
 

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If you plan on keeping the car you should have a warranty that will at a minimum cover catastrophic expenses (I.e. motor, transmission, etc). Unless something has recently changed Alfa does not perform engine mtce in the us. There are several stories in here about folks who had their engines swapped for what would be considered minor (I.e bad lifter). Engine swap could be as high as 30k. Motor has to come out of car to replace turbos. In short, small issues could cost a lot due to the design of the car. Ferrari had same issues in 80s and 90s with many models requiring engine removal for a major service every 15k miles. Resale on those models has taken a hit based on the high mtce costs. Newer models don’t require engine out services on many of their newer models. The QV motor is also direct injection. 2020 models are direct injection as well as port injection which fixes the carbon buildup issues 17s-19s will eventually have once they get to higher miles. Long way of saying I wouldn’t own the car without a warranty. My 2 cents
Didn't know carbon buildup was an issue.
I only use Chevron or Shell in my toys.
Best additives on the market IMO.
 

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If you plan on keeping the car you should have a warranty that will at a minimum cover catastrophic expenses (I.e. motor, transmission, etc). Unless something has recently changed Alfa does not perform engine mtce in the us. There are several stories in here about folks who had their engines swapped for what would be considered minor (I.e bad lifter). Engine swap could be as high as 30k. Motor has to come out of car to replace turbos. In short, small issues could cost a lot due to the design of the car. Ferrari had same issues in 80s and 90s with many models requiring engine removal for a major service every 15k miles. Resale on those models has taken a hit based on the high mtce costs. Newer models don’t require engine out services on many of their newer models. The QV motor is also direct injection. 2020 models are direct injection as well as port injection which fixes the carbon buildup issues 17s-19s will eventually have once they get to higher miles. Long way of saying I wouldn’t own the car without a warranty. My 2 cents
You can’t clear carbon build up without removing the engine?
 

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Carbon buildup on the back of valves, valve seats and intakes are a fact of life for all direct injection engines that don’t also have some sort of port injection as well. This isn’t just an Alfa issue but any brand that has direct injection. Toyota, Alfa and others have been adding a port injector to address the Carbon issue. The main culprit is emissions systems that circulate exhaust gases back into the intake manifold. These gases contain carbon, oil residue from leaking turbo seals etc. Performance will suffer as buildup occurs on valve seats and the intake. At some point the buildup may require removal which may or may not require engine removal. In any case I doubt even max care will cover this but it shouldn’t be an issue till higher miles. Checkout engineering explained on YouTube as they have a very informative video on it
 

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There really isn't any solution for this, short of cleaning the top of the intake valves with some cleaner like Seafoam or safe media blasting with walnut shell fragments. I did the seafoam process on my old Audi TTS at around 48K miles - there was a hard layer of deposits on top of the valve faces at that mileage point that surely impacted air flow to some degree. It took about 2 days of on and off effort, moving the valves to the closed position, adding seafoam, letting it soak for a while, then working at it with plastic straws and a bundle of plastic zip ties wrapped together to gently lift the deposits. I got about 95% off this way, there were a few areas that just wouldn't budge. BUT, at least I was able to remove the intake manifold that had access to the intake ports. With the QV, I'm not sure that the intake can be removed with the engine in the car...so valve cleaning may not be possible. With the new dual injection system from 2020-later, this problem is resolved.

There was an interview with the head of BG chemicals a few years back about this, he stated that this was the most challenging problem facing the industry at the time...it affected all DI engines with no easy fix, and the longer it goes on the worse the impact is.

EDIT: Well according to my new Tech Authority USB e-manual, it IS possible to remove the intake manifolds with the engine in situ. Actually, the process does not look that bad. So everyone, around the 40K mark plan for an intake removal and few days of seafoam cleaning...by then, there will likely be some serious deposits on the valves.
 

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There really isn't any solution for this, short of cleaning the top of the intake valves with some cleaner like Seafoam or safe media blasting with walnut shell fragments. I did the seafoam process on my old Audi TTS at around 48K miles - there was a hard layer of deposits on top of the valve faces at that mileage point that surely impacted air flow to some degree. It took about 2 days of on and off effort, moving the valves to the closed position, adding seafoam, letting it soak for a while, then working at it with plastic straws and a bundle of plastic zip ties wrapped together to gently lift the deposits. I got about 95% off this way, there were a few areas that just wouldn't budge. BUT, at least I was able to remove the intake manifold that had access to the intake ports. With the QV, I'm not sure that the intake can be removed with the engine in the car...so valve cleaning may not be possible. With the new dual injection system from 2020-later, this problem is resolved.

There was an interview with the head of BG chemicals a few years back about this, he stated that this was the most challenging problem facing the industry at the time...it affected all DI engines with no easy fix, and the longer it goes on the worse the impact is.

EDIT: Well according to my new Tech Authority USB e-manual, it IS possible to remove the intake manifolds with the engine in situ. Actually, the process does not look that bad. So everyone, around the 40K mark plan for an intake removal and few days of seafoam cleaning...by then, there will likely be some serious deposits on the valves.
The port+direct for the 2020+ only offers a solution to a potential problem (carbon buildup) but creates another perhaps larger one, with significantly increased complexity to the fuel system on an engine that was not originally designed for it, not to mention (sorry guys) a dealer network that seems to be the last to know about any major updates.

Carbon buildup can be mitigated by effective factory calibration during powertrain development, along with consumer use of top-tier fuels and adherence to proper maintenance schedules. There are hundreds of thousands, if not millions of Ford EcoBoost DI variants and GM 3.6L V-6 engines in service and I haven't heard much about any carbon issues, and I've followed gasoline direct injection fuel system development since at least 2008. The major offenders are those from the VAG group, with the 2.0, 3.1L (3.2) V-6 and 4.2L V-8 being particularly terrible to deal with. As an example, the V-8s use a triple cyclonic oil separator that is notoriously problematic and easily clogged, which exacerbates the problem and is a PITA to replace, as most applications have it resting against the rear firewall, in back of the intake manifold near all the timing components. (This is something that is often overlooked during the carbon cleaning rituals that are needed every 20-30k miles with those vehicles.)

Also keep in mind, Alfa added port injection to the 2020 NAFTA vehicles to streamline the global supply chain, not to mitigate against a known problem. Most markets already had this for 2019 as it was due to the Euro6d emissions requirements, and is in lieu of adding a particular filter to the system (which, incidentally, they did with the non-QV engine.)
 

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There is a serious downside to the soak and scrape method of removing carbon on a turbocharged engine. If you aren’t careful to vacuum the cleaner and carbon chunks out of the intake, the carbon chunks can end up destroying the turbo.

I know shops that prohibit their techs from using that method on turbo cars.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Carbon buildup on the back of valves, valve seats and intakes are a fact of life for all direct injection engines that don’t also have some sort of port injection as well. This isn’t just an Alfa issue but any brand that has direct injection. Toyota, Alfa and others have been adding a port injector to address the Carbon issue. The main culprit is emissions systems that circulate exhaust gases back into the intake manifold. These gases contain carbon, oil residue from leaking turbo seals etc. Performance will suffer as buildup occurs on valve seats and the intake. At some point the buildup may require removal which may or may not require engine removal. In any case I doubt even max care will cover this but it shouldn’t be an issue till higher miles. Checkout engineering explained on YouTube as they have a very informative video on it
I had just assumed that with modern catalysts, micro managed fuel injection and clean fuels we were well beyond such an insane, shooting one's self in the foot, idea as exhaust gas re-circulation.
Have never seen it on any of my cars since an 1980 TR8 once owned.
 

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I had just assumed that with modern catalysts, micro managed fuel injection and clean fuels we were well beyond such an insane, shooting one's self in the foot, idea as exhaust gas re-circulation.
Have never seen it on any of my cars since an 1980 TR8 once owned.
Actually it’s worse now. With emissions limits manufacturers are forced to recirculate exhaust gases to cut down on emissions to the car and then the tailpipe Search youtube about it. Lots of good videos. Engineering explained has a good one. Oil catch can may help but with the complex system on the QVs it makes it difficult
 

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LightGuy, I had two TR8's, which for their time were as quick as the then 'vet's. One, a pre-production coupe, then a Huffaker racing prepped roadster. Loved them both, the latter burned in my garage due to a gas leak being ignited by the garage hot water gas heater. Both Stromberg cars and de-smogged. The coupe was a BorgWarner auto, the roadster, a 5 speed. Loved them. NV
 
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