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Etrailer sells a class II hitch made by Curt, which our Alfa dealer installed on my wife's Stelvio. But Curt doesn't make and etralier doesn't sell a hitch for the Giulia. Their powertrains and chassis are virtually identical, so I'm not sure why the Giulia isn't being addressed by the aftermarket. It's not because it's "not advised" by Alfa Romeo — how many pages of engine, suspension and brake modifications are there in this forum? None of which are advised by Alfa Romeo, and would just as easily disqualify a warranty claim as towing a trailer behind a Giulia. Let's be realistic here.

Most of Driven's points were well put, but I'll contradict his s.w.a.g. about wiring trailer lights by tapping into existing circuits. It can't be done anymore. I've done that on more than 15 vehicles over 50 years, and the last one it worked on was my 2003 Honda Element. I often added amber turn signal lights to my trailers when the brake and turn signal light circuits got separated. I last tried doing that on my previous 2013 Abarth and my wife's previous 2016 Fiat 500X. Both vehicles had Curt hitches. But there is literally NO WAY to wire modern automobiles for trailer lights merely by tapping into circuits without a roughly $75 powered converter kit. I burned fuses and nearly fused wires, all the while blowing error codes on the dash. The manufacturers have virtually removed "backyard electrical work". On the plus side, your car can tell you exactly which bulb is burned out now, and which tire is flat. So there's that.

Our two Fiats were "relatively" easy, plugging into the existing taillight connectors, though getting a power wire under the car from the hitch up to the battery was not a pleasant endeavor, but the lights worked out correctly. I have the converter package for our Stelvio, but haven't gotten around to hooking it up. Hers is more complex than the simple plug-ins for our Fiats, but I'm experienced with this kind of stuff, so it will just amount to a couple hour or so of swearing. Thankfully, the battery is in the back, where the wiring is!

Speaking of horsepower to pull a trailer, and brakes to stop one, my Abarth could tow our 16" Hobie Catamaran just fine, but we only rarely used the Abarth for that duty. The Hobie and trailer are light as a feather, but incredibly non-aerodynamic, yet my 160 hp Honda Element towed it hundreds of miles like a champ. Our 280 hp Stelvio won't even break a sweat. Towing a trailer is an acquired skill; some people become good at it, and some are loons.

BenJim9104's primary problem is that there just isn't a hitch built for the Giulia. Creating one from scratch would be prohibitively expensive, and certainly far more trouble than successful. Renting a small van camper/motor home or borrowing a brother's/brother-in-law's pickup truck would be a far better choice.
 

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three little words that = no

Carbon fiber Driveshaft.
 

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three little words that = no

Carbon fiber Driveshaft.
I believe Stelvio, which is rated for use as a tow vehicle, has a CF driveshaft.

The first thing you need in a tow vehicle is some ground clearance. This type of trailer must be front heavy to be stable on the road and that weight is going to be applied to the tow vehicle behind the far rear of the car, making the car squat. Note how vehicles that are rated to tow very heavy trailers use a "fifth wheel" type coupler that is centered over the rear axle in order to reduce stability impacts to the towing vehicle. Also, your safety chains hang below the hitch and cannot drag on the ground, at least unless you want to risk getting sued for starting a billion dollar fire.

Some heavy duty class IV hitches have large springs between the trailer and the receiver that compensate for this tow vehicle loading. However that arrangement puts a large torque moment on the rear of the towing vehicle frame and these type hitches are usually only found on 3/4 ton and larger pickup trucks.

FWIW: Per what I was taught in truck driving school, the most dangerous vehicle on the roads in the USA is the double trailer milk truck. They can't stop fast and they can't turn sharply so give them a wide berth. These machines congregate around cheese factories...
 

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Most of Driven's points were well put, but I'll contradict his s.w.a.g. about wiring trailer lights by tapping into existing circuits. It can't be done anymore.
Really depends.

I wired a 7 pin connector with working trailer brakes on a 2014 wagon. I did have to add a brake controller and tapped into the brake switch for the input to the controller. Signals and parking lamps work off the taillamp harness, despite the taillamps being largely CANBus based.


It can be done if you are willing to troubleshoot, but there are definitely better/cleaner methods, such as power converters/PNP connectors, as you suggested.

98984
 

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The latest adapters for trailer harnesses use relays and proper resistence so as not to cause undue load on the tail/brake light circuit. Straight up going parallel off of the lights is what causes issues.
 

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Anyone else noticed the OP hasn't come back to comment after four days?

The less than 2900 lb. camper trailer must be some family heirloom or relic that "needs to be preserved, or moved" for posterity's sake, or something like that. Remember — he didn't want to go into detail...

99% chance his Giulia isn't going to be pulling that "thing" anywhere.

Memorial Day weekend, when families and friends move around or move mountains, highways packed to the gills and beyond! So glad to be sitting at home, directly over the garage stalls of our Stelvio and our Giulia, patiently waiting to celebrate my birthday on Monday, actual Memorial Day!

Cheers, all!
 
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