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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know it's no Quad but with a few performance mods such as the corsa exhaust, V2 intake and hopefully the Eurocompulsion tune the Ti will be a beast in it's own right. I'm excited about the difference I have now with the exhaust and V2. It would be nice to get a reliable 330 to 350 hp and 370ish ft/lbs of torque. Those numbers would make it a blast to drive. If they get a proven lowering kit for the Q4 (which I have) I would consider that also.
 

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My take....
When we have thousands who have pushed the Giulia to a "stage 1"/"stage 2" level, and had no ill effects... then I would say ok (ala Cobb Tuning).
Until then, and this is only my opinion, let's see how this first really reliable Alfa does.
Don't be get me wrong, my head is swirling with power mods ideas (look at my car history below), but who wants to find out what the engine heads can handle, or If raising boost leans it out too much, or if Alfa truly pushed this 2.0L to the max without any slack a tune can take advantage of.
Just my $0.02
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I put my faith in the thorough testing process that Eurocompulsion does before they put a part for sale.
 

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I promise everyone we are working hard on this stuff. Our current combination for power is V2, Centerline/Magnaflow exhaust, and ECU tune. I think it's around 350hp. It's very fast. We installed the KW V3 coil over kit yesterday and will talk more about that as soon as we have a little more time with it. It's my belief that these mods will make the Giulia and Giulia TI competitive around a track with almost every sedan on the road. It's still not going to beat a stock QV with equal drivers, but it's at least in the game with the M cars.

Greg
 

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2020 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sport Ti AWD
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At this point (and since I lease) I'll just wait and see whether the rumors of a ~350HP Veloce are true. If so, I'll have a decision to make when the time comes to replace my present Giulia.
 
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I put my faith in the thorough testing process that Eurocompulsion does before they put a part for sale.
I believe they do their best at testing, getting the right numbers etc.
I'm just hoping Alfa is manufacturing consistent cars as far as all "moving" parts.
I am telling myself that the 4C and the Abarth are a good case study for this engine with these tune/parts, and hoping for the same here with the Giulia.
I jumped the gun on a tune in the past as soon as the first 300 miles of a new car, so I'm definitely watching, and reading anything relating to mods. I have the modding "bug".
 

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"proper" - simply the ability to defeat traction control if/when one desires.
but I guess it's not that simple
Yeah, I've done a bit of research on this traction control issue and it's definitely not a new problem or any way unique to Alfa. Searching any of the Mercedes forums you'll find they dealt with this same issue for years. I also had a similar issue with my prior VW with stability control.

The forum evolution is always the same. Folks start with pulling fuses, then try combination steps like "DYNO MODE" in the Mercedes.

The story always ends with a tuner coming out with a solution. So while I'm eagerly waiting for a solution to traction control it really doesn't impact 99% of my driving use cases. Now let's see if my opinion changes once we get some snow on the ground :)
 

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At this point (and since I lease) I'll just wait and see whether the rumors of a ~350HP Veloce are true. If so, I'll have a decision to make when the time comes to replace my present Giulia.
As interesting I think will be how they achieve it. Wonder if there will be a further ability to mod a Veloce :D
 

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Yeah, I've done a bit of research on this traction control issue and it's definitely not a new problem or any way unique to Alfa. Searching any of the Mercedes forums you'll find they dealt with this same issue for years. I also had a similar issue with my prior VW with stability control.

The forum evolution is always the same. Folks start with pulling fuses, then try combination steps like "DYNO MODE" in the Mercedes.

The story always ends with a tuner coming out with a solution. So while I'm eagerly waiting for a solution to traction control it really doesn't impact 99% of my driving use cases. Now let's see if my opinion changes once we get some snow on the ground :)
You'd think after enough road service calls from people stuck in snow due to the lack of a TC off button product planning would get the message.
 

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for AWD "proper' would be TC stays on for the front wheels or power cut completely to the front, allowing driver discretion for the back.

"some snow on the ground", well that's to a large extent the point

 

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for AWD "proper' would be TC stays on for the front wheels or power cut completely to the front, allowing driver discretion for the back.

"some snow on the ground", well that's to a large extent the point

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dvtgm-jEiyc
I think what you describe above is AWD defeat. I wanted that for my Chrysler 300, which went into AWD below a certain temperature. While I would appreciate drive wheel control, TC defeat (ideally separate from ESC defeat) is more important to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I believe they do their best at testing, getting the right numbers etc.
I'm just hoping Alfa is manufacturing consistent cars as far as all "moving" parts.
I am telling myself that the 4C and the Abarth are a good case study for this engine with these tune/parts, and hoping for the same here with the Giulia.
I jumped the gun on a tune in the past as soon as the first 300 miles of a new car, so I'm definitely watching, and reading anything relating to mods. I have the modding "bug".
Lets face it, a certain percentage of any manufacturers cars fail. I don't sweat that stuff, but I do rely on knowledgeable, reputable people and companies and that is why I put my faith in Eurocompulsion.
 

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"more important to me"
what I'd really like is a row of buttons to turn each of these things on if wanted - they kinda scare me from the point of view that people have no didea what is actually going on where the rubber meets the road, and probably no idea how to react when they inevitably overstep the limits of all 4 contact patches at once, which will likely occur at a higher speed than if they had none of them to start with.

be that as it may, my solution to "yawn control" seems pretty simple:

Split the wires coming from each front wheel sensor to the computer, so they each have two connectors.
Run the extra set of wires to a switch, on the other end of which the rear wheel sensors plug in.
When the flick the switch, the real rear wheel sensor signal is disconnected, and instead the duplicate front signals are sent to the computer.
Computer thinks all wheels are turning at the same speed as the fronts.

Patent pending, licensee applications being accepted.
The state of California has determined this product may be hazardous to your health and it is not CARB certified so may not be used on any public roadways in the state of California, nor off road vehicles utilizing green or red sticker licensing.
 

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"more important to me"
what I'd really like is a row of buttons to turn each of these things on if wanted - they kinda scare me from the point of view that people have no didea what is actually going on where the rubber meets the road, and probably no idea how to react when they inevitably overstep the limits of all 4 contact patches at once, which will likely occur at a higher speed than if they had none of them to start with.

be that as it may, my solution to "yawn control" seems pretty simple:

Split the wires coming from each front wheel sensor to the computer, so they each have two connectors.
Run the extra set of wires to a switch, on the other end of which the rear wheel sensors plug in.
When the flick the switch, the real rear wheel sensor signal is disconnected, and instead the duplicate front signals are sent to the computer.
Computer thinks all wheels are turning at the same speed as the fronts.

Patent pending, licensee applications being accepted.
The state of California has determined this product may be hazardous to your health and it is not CARB certified so may not be used on any public roadways in the state of California, nor off road vehicles utilizing green or red sticker licensing.
Too late for the patent, I already suggested something similar. What I have in mind would only work to get unstuck from snow from a standing start: intercept the signals from the two rear wheel sensors and replace with the average of the two. This should stop traction control from cutting in on the rear wheels if only one wheel is spinning. This is a relatively simple device that should not be overly expensive to develop.

To defeat the whole thing, one needs to know the drive shaft speed and the steering angle. From those it should be possible to generate fake signals for the wheel speeds for all wheels via some not entirely trivial math. If the TC also has an accelerometer this still won't work perfectly. However, Giulia seems to be happy on a stationary dynamometer, so I think if there is an accelerometer it only measures lateral forces.

A single design could work for practically any car, with the only difference being the pickups for steering angle and driveshaft speed and some parameters for suspension geometry, gearing ratios and wheel speed pulse rates. This is a relatively complex design that would require real money to develop.
 

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Isn't today's answer more likely to be "do it all via software"?
 

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Yeah, I've done a bit of research on this traction control issue and it's definitely not a new problem or any way unique to Alfa. Searching any of the Mercedes forums you'll find they dealt with this same issue for years. I also had a similar issue with my prior VW with stability control.

The forum evolution is always the same. Folks start with pulling fuses, then try combination steps like "DYNO MODE" in the Mercedes.

The story always ends with a tuner coming out with a solution. So while I'm eagerly waiting for a solution to traction control it really doesn't impact 99% of my driving use cases. Now let's see if my opinion changes once we get some snow on the ground :)
If someone has the service manual and wants to send me some copies of the wiring for the Yaw sensor I can look into it. I know on my 370z, (even though it had traction control off button, it still retained a very small %) I had to disconnect the yaw (G) sensor and it would disable everything since the car can no longer read the g sensor, later once plugged back in or put a toggle switch it would return back to normal.

So whoever has a service manual, look for the yaw sensor/g sensor, usually it is a bosch sensor, look under ABS/Brakes, for example here it is on a 370z
 

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