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Aren't run flat tires heavier than regular tires? Plus they are unsprung weight. I would think that they'd have a bigger impact on performance and fuel economy. than just having a spare tire in the trunk.

Interesting that run flats are generally non-repairable. Doesn't surprise me!

What about the inflators with the can of goop. I've always heard that these ruin the tire and renders it non-repairable. Is that true?
Yes the RFTs are heavier (about 3 pounds each) and have stiffer sidewalls. That will clearly make the ride more harsh and increase wheel hop on uneven surfaces. The Cinturatos seemed adequate until I swapped them for Michelin A/S 3+ in 245 35R19 (about the same weight), and upgraded the wheels to Tecnicos, the net of which perform way better.

You don't have to use the goop unless the leak is fairly bad. Some folks carry a plug kit, which is fine if you can locate the puncture and know how to use it and weather/road permit its use (needs to be dry and clean).
 

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People should be reminded that in some areas of the country there is spotty or no cell phone service. Good idea to carry small compressor, green slime and puncture repair kit which will all fit in space under trunk floor. Run flat sidewalls are likely damaged if they are driven on with low or no air in the tire. They may be repairable if you catch flat beforehand.
 

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Whilst blowouts are actually rare, I am extremely grateful for the run flats on my Giulia.
Last year I hit a particularly large pothole that I couldn't avoid at around 120kmh. The side wall of the tyre was badly torn but integrity remained. I could cruise to a stop to inspect. I then drove about 30 kms to next town (at much reduced speed) for replacement.
I am convinced that I would have ended up in a field, or worse, oncoming traffic if I'd had normal tyres. I would want run flats on any car I buy in future. That would be a deal breaker for me.
 

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Whilst blowouts are actually rare, I am extremely grateful for the run flats on my Giulia.
Last year I hit a particularly large pothole that I couldn't avoid at around 120kmh. The side wall of the tyre was badly torn but integrity remained. I could cruise to a stop to inspect. I then drove about 30 kms to next town (at much reduced speed) for replacement.
I am convinced that I would have ended up in a field, or worse, oncoming traffic if I'd had normal tyres. I would want run flats on any car I buy in future. That would be a deal breaker for me.
Tires can easily be changed after purchasing a car. I wouldn't consider the tires to be a 'deal breaker'. I respect your views and decision to prefer run-flats over other tire types, life saving situations are always a big motivator. But, don't let the OEM tires stop you from buying an otherwise excellent car when tires are one of the easiest things to change.

I know some lease policies dictate that OEM tires must be on the car when returning the car, so storing the original tires for four years would the prudent thing to do while riding on tires that you prefer. Remount the original tires just before returning the leased car.
 

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Tires can easily be changed after purchasing a car. I wouldn't consider the tires to be a 'deal breaker'. I respect your views and decision to prefer run-flats over other tire types, life saving situations are always a big motivator. But, don't let the OEM tires stop you from buying an otherwise excellent car when tires are one of the easiest things to change.

I know some lease policies dictate that OEM tires must be on the car when returning the car, so storing the original tires for four years would the prudent thing to do while riding on tires that you prefer. Remount the original tires just before returning the leased car.

I am going to do it, that way. I will put on new 245/40x19's RFT and will store the current OEMs with about 10K miles. As I will need to return my lease with decent OEM tires, I will re-install the OEMs by then.
 

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I have run-flats on my 2017 Giulia. They work as advertised. Had a nail in one, went to the shop and they were able to fix it. And like a number of people have said, you have roadside assistance. Plus where are you gonna put the jack in the trunk, let alone the location below the car? Not like in the old day..jack, spare, lug nuts that are a pain in ass to remove, bad weather, etc. Call for assistance.

The only issue that I have is the tire itself. I often need to go and add air. (Once every 2-3 months)

CIao,

Ray
 

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I am trying to decide whether or not to get a Giulia and am trying to figure out whether or not it's a deal breaker for me not to have a spare tire in the car. I live in a relatively urban area with a lot of construction debris and potholes so sudden tire deflation aren't that uncommon, but I've probably only needed to actually utilize my spare tires every few years or so.

What do you guys think about this? Has this ever left you stranded? Are there any compact spare options?

If this is a commonly discussed topic I apologize!
I am clearly in the minority here baed on the other comments, but I will not take a car with no spare tire more than a few hours from home. We get a flat or a damaged wheel that renders the car undriveable about once a year (or so) between our two cars. Recently, I had a damaged tire from a pothole and had to take an Uber home. I had to get a floor jack and some tools and drive back to the dead Alfa in my truck to remove the wheel. It took 3-4 days to order a new tire so the car was on a jack in a friend's driveway for almost a week. I now have bought a portable jack, lug wrench, and a used wheel/tire assembly that I put in the trunk anytime we are going more than a few hours form home. Note that you are only supposed to drive a maximum of 50 miles on a run-flat. This stuff uses much of the trunk since there is no spare tire well. Our Mercedes is in the same boat as the Alfa and it seems that many car makes are going this way. Its good for them, bad for us.
 

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I suspect a major reason so many cars nowadays come with no actual full size or emergency spare is because auto manufactures go to great lengths to take weight out of cars. And unless it is an SUV-sized vehicle, finding a place for a spare is just hard to find. A lot cheaper to find a cubby for a small air pump, and perhaps some "slime." Being far from home with a damaged tire is surely a real and even maybe dangerous circumstance.

We recently came back from cleaning out my mother in law's home a thousand miles away, with a completely full Jaguar Pace SUV. It has a space saver spare, but I told my wife that if we had to swap a damaged tire, she was going to ride home with the full size wheel on her lap.

I am planning on replacing my Quad's Corsa's next fall, and have yet to decide on the Michelin replacement choice. I no longer drive any great distances, being retired, and any roadside incident would be mostly an inconvenience for me.

Life is full of choices, tires for our cars being just one.

All the best....NV
 

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I am clearly in the minority here baed on the other comments, but I will not take a car with no spare tire more than a few hours from home. We get a flat or a damaged wheel that renders the car undriveable about once a year (or so) between our two cars. Recently, I had a damaged tire from a pothole and had to take an Uber home. I had to get a floor jack and some tools and drive back to the dead Alfa in my truck to remove the wheel. It took 3-4 days to order a new tire so the car was on a jack in a friend's driveway for almost a week. I now have bought a portable jack, lug wrench, and a used wheel/tire assembly that I put in the trunk anytime we are going more than a few hours form home. Note that you are only supposed to drive a maximum of 50 miles on a run-flat. This stuff uses much of the trunk since there is no spare tire well. Our Mercedes is in the same boat as the Alfa and it seems that many car makes are going this way. Its good for them, bad for us.
That's pretty extreme IMO. If you don't have run-flat tires, get a fix a flat kit or 5. What kind of magic are you going to perform with that jack? Remove the tire? Why? To get it to a shop to replace? Well, 99% of the time the run-flats or a fix-a-flat will accomplish the same thing.
 

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I am clearly in the minority here baed on the other comments, but I will not take a car with no spare tire more than a few hours from home. We get a flat or a damaged wheel that renders the car undriveable about once a year (or so) between our two cars. Recently, I had a damaged tire from a pothole and had to take an Uber home. I had to get a floor jack and some tools and drive back to the dead Alfa in my truck to remove the wheel. It took 3-4 days to order a new tire so the car was on a jack in a friend's driveway for almost a week. I now have bought a portable jack, lug wrench, and a used wheel/tire assembly that I put in the trunk anytime we are going more than a few hours form home. Note that you are only supposed to drive a maximum of 50 miles on a run-flat. This stuff uses much of the trunk since there is no spare tire well. Our Mercedes is in the same boat as the Alfa and it seems that many car makes are going this way. Its good for them, bad for us.
Where are you driving? I would like to avoid that entire region. The last time I had a problem that needed a spare tire to fix was 1982 and in that case the tire failed (sidewall blew out) most likely due to shipping over inflation combined with an incompetent car dealership rather than from a road hazard. Since then I have driven all over the western USA, British Columbia and if you count rentals, Texas, NE USA and various spots in Europe.
 

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I am currently running Continentals (goflats) in a square setup on my Q4. A couple of points.

Runflats are no better than a space saver for distance or speed
Runflats cannot be driven on in a severe blowout
A significant pothole hit can damage tire and wheel or even just the wheel. Happened to me last winter (broken wheel). RFT's would not have helped. And I mean broken.
Goflats provide a more comfortable ride
Runflats (Pirelli's) did not last very long

Be aware of the pluses and minuses of each choice and make a wise decision. There will always be those for which the sky is falling regardless of choice.

Now, can i interest anyone in a discussion on oil or maybe darksiding a motorcycle?
 

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That's pretty extreme IMO. If you don't have run-flat tires, get a fix a flat kit or 5. What kind of magic are you going to perform with that jack? Remove the tire? Why? To get it to a shop to replace? Well, 99% of the time the run-flats or a fix-a-flat will accomplish the same thing.
Well, it just happened again to our other car - pothole cut thru the entire sidewall. No stop leak or air compressor in the trunk solves that.
 

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Well, it just happened again to our other car - pothole cut thru the entire sidewall. No stop leak or air compressor in the trunk solves that.
As others have said, ruining tires as frequently as you have reported is extreme. In my 40+ years of driving with a couple of hundred thousand miles driven I have ruined three car tires and two of those were still drive-able (sidewall bulge and screw in the sidewall). Only one failed from an impact (the sidewall bulge) and I was driving too fast for the condition of the road--so that one was my fault. Typical causes of ruined tires are incorrect inflation pressure, driving on already damaged tires (e.g. curbed) and driving too fast for the combination of the ability of the wheel/suspension combination to absorb impacts and the condition of the road.
 

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Well, it just happened again to our other car - pothole cut thru the entire sidewall. No stop leak or air compressor in the trunk solves that.
Your point? Do the magical run-flats do anything different in that scenario?
 

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The only thing I learned is that someone doesn't pay enough attention and/or follows too closely when driving.
Exactly, I was going to also say... quit hitting shit. But thought that I have caused enough problems on FB and message boards lately.
 

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Your point? Do the magical run-flats do anything different in that scenario?
Well, they may offer a bit more protection since they have stiffer and stronger sidewalls although Im not so sure and it's certainly debatable...what I am sure about is that the OP drives on some pretty bad roads...in 30 years of driving I think I may have had 2 flats.....I guess Im lucky.
 
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