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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this has been a discussion echoed through the ages, so perhaps I can narrow it down to a more answerable question. I understand winter tires are paramount. I also understand not to hoon on the interstate. And I lastly understand ground clearance will be an issue with anything outside of SUV land. But I know throttle response is also important. I've never driven a QV so I can't speak with certainty, but my assumption is dynamic/race modes have a touchy throttle.

SOOOOO, if I do all of the proper aforementioned winter driving prep tips, would switching to the Advanced Efficiency mode help reign in the throttle and make for a somewhat non-life-ending winter ride?

Thanks in advance. I want this car so much but I'm frankly scared to death of making the purchase and having a car that proves unusable during the winter. It would be my only car (just sold a 2016 WRX). FWIW my work drive will be about 15 miles each way on the I94.
 

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I know this has been a discussion echoed through the ages, so perhaps I can narrow it down to a more answerable question. I understand winter tires are paramount. I also understand not to hoon on the interstate. And I lastly understand ground clearance will be an issue with anything outside of SUV land. But I know throttle response is also important. I've never driven a QV so I can't speak with certainty, but my assumption is dynamic/race modes have a touchy throttle.

SOOOOO, if I do all of the proper aforementioned winter driving prep tips, would switching to the Advanced Efficiency mode help reign in the throttle and make for a somewhat non-life-ending winter ride?

Thanks in advance. I want this car so much but I'm frankly scared to death of making the purchase and having a car that proves unusable during the winter. It would be my only car (just sold a 2016 WRX). FWIW my work drive will be about 15 miles each way on the I94.
Not sure about winter, but just wanted to say I traded my 2016 WRX limited manual for a base awd and I love this car...
 

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Well with proper winter tires I have been fine in a tiny rwd Miata for 17 years. Deepest snow I drove in was about 4 inches. Up there, and with your concerns, I would go with a Q4. Add the winter tires to that and you should be in good shape. ASR, and Traction Control will help a lot. ASR on my Ferrari is strong and authoritative. I've driven this rear engine supercar in torrential rain and the throttle by wire is strict. You try to get on it and the computer says, "NO." Maintains a constant speed. You stomp on the brakes and the computer ABS says, "Gently please." Go Q4.
 

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If you can wait until next spring, there's always the Stelvio Quadrifolgio which will be Q4. But, I understand....waiting is soooo hard with this vehicle!
 

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i plan to drive my QV thru the winter in Cleveland.
can get pretty bad here, but maybe not as bad as Minnesota?
call me crazy, but throw on a set of Blizzaks, and it doesnt matter which wheels do the driving.
Ive driven an M3 thru the winter, no problem. Tires are everything.
I may cringe a little when the salt hits the chassis, but weekly washes should do the trick
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
i plan to drive my QV thru the winter in Cleveland.
can get pretty bad here, but maybe not as bad as Minnesota?
call me crazy, but throw on a set of Blizzaks, and it doesnt matter which wheels do the driving.
Ive driven an M3 thru the winter, no problem. Tires are everything.
I may cringe a little when the salt hits the chassis, but weekly washes should do the trick
Thanks for both comforting me and further confusing me :). I guess my biggest fear is the unknown. Never driven a RWD let alone a high performing one. The internet will have to trust that I have good general driving skills etc, and I'm also totally prepared to take a winter driving school to make up for my AWD daze. Man this is a hard decision.
 

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2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
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i plan to drive my QV thru the winter in Cleveland.
can get pretty bad here, but maybe not as bad as Minnesota?
call me crazy, but throw on a set of Blizzaks, and it doesnt matter which wheels do the driving.
Ive driven an M3 thru the winter, no problem. Tires are everything.
I may cringe a little when the salt hits the chassis, but weekly washes should do the trick
I don't think you can get a set of Blizzaks that will fit Giulia Quadrifoglio's rims.
Michelin X-Ice is available in a wider range of sizes.

QV supposedly has only 4 inches of ground clearance, so it won't take a lot of accumulation before your wheels aren't touching the ground.
Q4 has 6 inches of ground clearance according to my measurement, and it can be lifted a little bit by fitting larger diameter wheels.
My Crosstrek has about 8 inches of ground clearance, and I've managed to high center it.
I don't know how sturdy the aerodynamic plates underneath Giulia are. The plates under the Crosstrek are intended to be bash plates, so sliding along on them did not seem to do any harm to the car.

It's all about expected performance and conditions.

What does "hoon on the interstate" mean? Perhaps a Minnesotan expression, like oofda? Maybe a typo?
 

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Do you have a backup car/SUV when you know there's a bad storm coming or can you stay home? Experienced those winters in MN and I'd cringe at the thought of you in a quad trying to get through that. Not impossible just I had an RX7 as a daily in England and it was daft as **** doing that and wouldn't advise.
 

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Dude,
Either buy a used F150 as your back up or get a Q4. You can get an EC tune, exhaust, and other minor mods that will make this a beast but one that won't kill you in a snow storm
 

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As a frame of reference I've driven a GTR with all-seasons and my 911TT with winter tires here in Chicago and got along fine. Of course I'm not doing 4 wheel drifts either so that's why it's good. I plan on driving my QV in the winter with proper winter tires. If it absolutely gets crazy (like 8-12" in a day) then I've got the option of working at home.
 

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I drove a RWD Pontiac in college, in central Massachusetts (where they measure snow by the foot, not inches).

There are challenges, yes, but nothing that decent driving can't overcome.
 

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I live in WI and have owned Evos & a Mustang. I am well-equipped to give my $0.02 on your situation.

If you are expecting WRX fun from Nov-April in the Giulia QV prepare to be disappointed. Even with winter tires; which as you correctly mentioned, yes - are a must. The often stated RWD + snows > AWD is bull. Ask me how I know. I still shudder at the thought of not having an Evo during the winter some day, but it might happen (to make room for a QV!).

Still, like me, you sound ready for more performance. So please do step up to the QV. I'm drooling about the thought of one myself!

Purchase an inexpensive car, get a ride with friends, Uber, call in sick, etc. on the days you cannot make it in the QV with winter tires. But don't let your climate dictate your car purchase (within reason). Now that I have a truck, it's opened up my world to new "fun car" possibilities. Not that I regret my >10 years with Evos, love 'em, and yes, my ownership of them has no doubt been influenced by my climate, but you know what I mean...
 

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like others, I have no issue with RWD in the snow - and I absolutely prefer it to FWD.

but a Q in moderately deep snow would be a quick candidate for high centering and no wheel drive, and I don't have any faith in the CF retractable snow plow it comes with, especially with the snow plow induced ice berm at the end of my driveway.

personally I am waiting for the Stelvio Q before making a final decision, and hoping Race mode turns it into RWD only, which is especially fun in snow.
 

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Thanks for both comforting me and further confusing me :). I guess my biggest fear is the unknown. Never driven a RWD let alone a high performing one. The internet will have to trust that I have good general driving skills etc, and I'm also totally prepared to take a winter driving school to make up for my AWD daze. Man this is a hard decision.
I have not tested the QV in snow, but my one-time test (parking lot with 4 inches of snow) of the RWD BMW 228i with traction control vs my (almost forgotten) Lexus FWD sedan showed that modern traction control transforms RWD into something much better than those of us from "the before times" thought possible.
The Lexus FWD might have still been better at getting un-stuck, but underway the RWD 228i handled far better. Traction control was really effective, and in 10 - 25 mph range your could not get the rear to slide around. (Could not try faster.) The Lexus on the other hand easily lost steering ability. Of course as speed increases -- eventually all bets are off. RWD cars with and without traction control are like apples and oranges.Read up more on traction control.

I do not consider the QV throttle touchy, and I think the idea is that traction control takes over when needed anyway.
 

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I plan on buying a good set of winter tires for my QV, I will have to wait and see how it does in the Chicago winter. I second Arock's comment, a good set of winter tires makes all the difference. I used to own a lexus IS350 RWD and I used that car for 3 winters in Chicago area. I had a decent set of Michelin winter tires on it and I never had any issues with the car in the winter. I even drove through 3-4 inches of snow more than a few times (my town is not the best when it comes to cleaning the snow off the roads) and the car handled it fine. I used to think that my all-weather brigdestones would work in the winter but boy was I wrong. My first snow in the Lexus, I could not move the car out of the parking lot with all-weather tires on it. After switching to winter set, I never had issues. The lexus also had a snow mode which reduced the power and smoothes out the power delivery, and I think the advanced efficiency mode works the same way as well. This mode will definitely help. In my experience, if you drive RWD car with winter tires, smoothly in the snow, it will feel and drive like any other car. The only down sides of the winter tires are that they make more noise and they don't last long. 3 seasons is the max per set and just 2 seasons if you drive aggressively.
 
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