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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


I'm not sure if being "technically immature" is better or worse than failing a crash test in terms of the reason for a delay, but that is the explanation that FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne went with to explain the delay of the Giulia in a press conference at the Geneva Motor Show. Of course, the technical immaturity could be another way of saying "failed a crash test."

Marchionne's direct quote:

"The project was technically immature. We will start only when we are on par with the Germans, otherwise it is not worth the effort.
A delay is is preferable to a botched launch though. messing up the launch of the Giulia would be disastrous for both Alfa Romeo and FCA. Marchionne agrees that the stakes are high:

The brand has historically failed to meet its technical ambitions. If we get that wrong we might as well go back home. If the Giulia doesn't give the best possible performance we've wasted our time, and a pot of money."
http://www.roadandtrack.com/new-car...e-giulia-because-it-was-technically-immature/
 

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Well there's just about nothing else to expect him to say, it's always going to be something very general they give as a response. All i care is that in the end I get a good product and at least with it being an Alfa Romeo they have some standards to live up to. Now to see what the Giulia is like in the flesh and over a long period of time with owners.
 

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Report from Topgear may shed more light with quote from Alfa CEO:
http://www.topgear.com/car-news/concept/all-gossip-geneva-motor-show#1

Harald Wester, Alfa CEO, says that the delay was needed to make sure all systems on the car “had the necessary maturity”.

We ask him about a report in a well-sourced industry newspaper that the car was delayed because it failed crash tests. He looks TG dead in the eye and calmly raises a single finger in the air.

So we ask him for a quote. “Nothing of this is true. Absolutely nothing. When it [the story] was written, we had homologation in the US and Europe and we had five stars. The only thing we were working on was the very difficult small-overlap test.” He explains they were trying to get a common structure that would work both for the Giulia and the next new Alfa, a heavier crossover. And they succeeded.
 

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That response is how you know it was true, just didn't want to say it and they won't, it's what we can expect of them all the time. It's their job to make things sound good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was surprised at the rushed development. That just seems like a poor decision because it didn't work and then they had to delay things. May as well have just taken a more normal amount of time to develop the vehicle in the first place.
 

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Well the probably had other things factoring in to this date, expectations and deadlines to meet. It happens, just as long as it's not a common thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Chevy rushed the Bolt and it all went well. But rushing and then messing things up, makes the rush look like a poor move.
 

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What also has to be factored in is what went into the job, what they established with the tech before the car they rushed even came to the drawing board and Chevy has been in this game for a while since the Volt. A lot of things they learned with the Volt more than likely contributed to greater success with the Bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That's quite true. Meanwhile, the Giulia is a completely new platform. It is a brand new vehicle in a brand that hasn't had a ton of attention recently. I can see how those differing contexts really have an influence when it comes to the success or failure of each vehiclel.
 
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