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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own a 2018 Giulia Ti with about 4000 miles on it. It has been trouble free to date and is, of course, wonderful to drive. My question to the forum is - what advice would you give for me to check out on my car before embarking on a 3,500 mile drive this summer? I will be going up through the Canadian Maritime provinces so there will be no Alfa dealer nearby (nearest is in Montreal several hundred miles to the west). Obviously I will verify all the fluid levels and tire condition but are there any other things I should do? I even wonder if I bring it in to the dealer beforehand and ask them check things could they possibly make things worse? I have purchased a full size spare tire and wheel (I don't trust the run flats) which will be in my trunk. I've always been a "car guy" so have pretty good knowledge of the car systems, but they are quite complex nowadays, as you all know. I'm 75 years old so I don't relish the idea of a breakdown in a remote location. Maybe best advice is take a sedative, stop worrying and have a good time. What say any of you-all? :smile2:
 

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I took my ‘17 Giulia Ti on a 3,500 mile trip form Texas to San Diego to Vegas and back. The only thing I took was an inflator and tire goop, yes our tires are runflat but they’re rated for 50 mile range, an open tire place in the middle of the night might be way further. And the only thing I had to buy on the way was a roll of good quality gorilla tape to fix the tiny black plastic air diverted in front of the wheel after I nailed a rabbit in Arizona at 80 MPH. The tape is still holding fast 8 months later, wasn’t even a need to fix. Otherwise I had no mechanical issues.
 

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‘19 Giulia Ti Sport Q4
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It seems, from reading here, that the most grievous issues stem from low battery power. I don't know if that means getting your battery tested beforehand is wise, or if packing out a battery is also wise, but I do think I would personally be more inclined to take a tire plug kit, compressor, and Fix-a-Flat before I packed out a full size spare; remember, you still need to jack the car to change a wheel out, and there's not much clearance for a common scissor jack.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I took my ‘17 Giulia Ti on a 3,500 mile trip form Texas to San Diego to Vegas and back. The only thing I took was an inflator and tire goop, yes our tires are runflat but they’re rated for 50 mile range, an open tire place in the middle of the night might be way further. And the only thing I had to buy on the way was a roll of good quality gorilla tape to fix the tiny black plastic air diverted in front of the wheel after I nailed a rabbit in Arizona at 80 MPH. The tape is still holding fast 8 months later, wasn’t even a need to fix. Otherwise I had no mechanical issues.


Good to hear your trip went so well (except for the rabbit).
 

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I echo the above posts: 12V compressor, tire plug kit and-or tire goop, duct tape, one of those new-fangled mini battery booster packs, a quart of the rare and highly priced 0W-30 engine oil, and a cell phone.

Safe travels.
 

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"75 years old"
I think you probably know better than most of us, but being not that much younger and having done plenty of road trips, my 2 cents is:
don't drink too much coffee when you stop, watch for moose, stay on the two lanes, and enjoy the trip - this is what Alfa's are for.
 

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Such trips are much more routine than in the old days. Now I just check tire pressure, make sure the car isn't due for an oil change or other maintenance, clean the windows inside and out, fill with fuel, and hit the road.
 

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Canada isn't really the Gobi desert these days. But rather than worrying about the car, I would make sure to take some things to make it more comfortable if a breakdown does occur in a remote area: Some food, water, flashlight, blanket, rain gear, toilet paper, and mosquito repellent. Since you are going to be nearer the arctic circle there will be plenty of hard sun in the summer so include some good sunscreen. A good knife is always handy. Basically, plan on being on your own for a day in any weather.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
"75 years old"
I think you probably know better than most of us, but being not that much younger and having done plenty of road trips, my 2 cents is:
don't drink too much coffee when you stop, watch for moose, stay on the two lanes, and enjoy the trip - this is what Alfa's are for.


Lost1750GTV - Good advice, watch the coffee, and there are a lot of moose up there. Thanks.
 

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Or, maybe just drive it like it was intended and enjoy!

The first most important thing you need to take is your cell phone, and make sure you have roaming/data at least available when you might need want it. After that, the phone number of your Alfa dealer and the phone number of Alfa Cares. Finally, a couple credit cards.

You’re not going anywhere that isn’t at least 30 minutes from cellular reach, and can be reached by a flatbed tow within a few hours. I know: been there, done that, in one of several Italian exotics (mostly more fussy and untested than the Giulia), and once in a rare while, have had an “Issue” where we needed assistance. Alfa and/or your dealer will help you if you can’t find local assistance.

But mostly, that stuff that “could happen” just doesn’t. We’ve put well over 750K miles on one Italian exotic or another over the last 20 years, crossed all over the US and into Canada many times, and have never had a reason to worry about being stranded or in peril.

Do the drive, have fun, and trust in the infrastructure that you have paid for to have your back if you need it, but mostly, trust that you won’t need it, and drive the **** out of that Alfa!!!
 

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But mostly, that stuff that “could happen” just doesn’t.
Yeah, and mostly you aren't t-boned by a drunk when you take the car for a drive, so you just didn't need that seat belt. But you wear it anyway because "mostly" also means "sometimes".

It's best to be prepared at some level in an environment that can be demanding.
 
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