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Alfa at 1:22 for those with Facebook access.


Words to read for those without.

 

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I do not see anything wrong in Carlos Tavares' ability and capability to lead Stellantis, including Alfa Romeo, to success. This is what I read:

Carlos Tavares started his career at Renault in 1981. His first period with the company culminated in the position of director of the Renault Mégane II project. In 2004, he ventured away from Renault to take on the job of program director at Nissan. After working his way up to becoming executive vice president with a spot on the board of directors, he returned to Renault in 2011 to become chief operating officer. Two years later, he resigned after ruffling the feathers of CEO Carlos Ghosn when he publicly stated he wanted to become CEO at an automaker.

Carlos Tavares transformed PSA. Within a year of resigning from Renault, Tavares was back doing what he does best as the chief executive officer and Chairman of the Managing Board of Groupe PSA. Since joining the company, he’s been credited for transforming its fortunes via the implementation of cost-cutting measures and expansion policies. As well as increasing the company’s share of the highly lucrative Chinese market, he also spearheaded the acquisition of Opel, returning the German automobile manufacturer to profitability and increasing PSA’s profits in the process.

Carlos Tavares believes in keeping humble. As one of the most successful CEOs in the automotive business, Tavares would be forgiven for letting his ego run away with him occasionally. In fact, he does the opposite, operating from the firm belief that a big dose of humble pie is vital to good management. Tavares’ personal style is a world away from the “Super CEO” character of his former boss, Carlos Ghosn. He keeps an almost excessively low profile, preferring to be seen as nothing more than one of the cogs in the machine. “The CEO is just a tool to make things happen, and the toolbox is very, very big,” he says.

Carlos Tavares has always been passionate about cars. It was little wonder that Tavares choose the career he did. He began getting passionate about cars as a teen, even volunteering to become a track marshal on the Estoril circuit. at the age of 14. By the time he was 22, he was participating in amateur racing and by 1983, he was a regular at rallies and endurance races. Today, he has his own racing team, Clementeam Racing, and has a track record that includes competing in the legendary Monte-Carlo Rally and winning the A2 class of the Barcelona 24 Hours.

Carlos Tavares has been voted World Car Person Of The Year. In 2020, Tavares’ extensive achievements were recognized by the World Car Awards when 86 jurors from 24 countries voted him the winner of the prestigious World Car Person of the Year. The award recognized his accomplishments in negotiating the merger of PSA and FCA, strengthening market development in China, spearheading the integration of electrification, and returning the brand to profitability. Receiving the award, Tavares said “It is a great honor to receive this prestigious award which I wish to dedicate to all the employees of the Groupe PSA. Because among our values “win together, agility, efficiency” includes the strength of the collective power, it is in the name all of us that I accept your honor with humility.”

Carlos Tavares believes in second chances. Stellantis has one of the largest portfolios in the industry. Some of the brands within that portfolio are in profit, others, including the premium brands Alfa Romeo, DS, and Lancia, are struggling. While it might seem prudent to whittle down the portfolio by scrapping the weaker brands, Tavares has decided to give them a 10-year window of continued investment to prove themselves. About the decision, he explained “My clear management stance is that we give a chance to each of our brands, under the leadership of a strong CEO, to define their vision, build a roadmap and make sure they use the valuable assets of Stellantis to make their business case fly.”
 

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I do not see anything wrong in Carlos Tavares' ability and capability to lead Stellantis, including Alfa Romeo, to success. This is what I read:
Aall good, reasonable, and impressive. I am reacting to what I have heard people in the Detroit area saying. Carlos has yet to win over the troops the way Sergio, and even Mike Manley, did. There may even be a bias (unwarranted) against him. I can hardly say I blame people who have been through three take offers for being skeptical. And there is likely some geographical mindset at play.
 

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Sad fact is frankly one of two things happened with Marchione's untimely passing. 1: there was no "plan in place" for what happened. The architect died before his plan was fully implemented and the road map was still in his head.
2: there was a road map for others to follow, BUT the passion that gave birth to this died with him and his followers lacked the "economic will" to see this through properly.
My personal take is that while on the outside everything was "peachy" with Marchione, I am willing to bet that on his passing Mr. Elkann had a big hand in what transpired next. Just my read.
Not that it matters because "it is what it is" now.
 

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@Chipshot, @MDriver, you are both correct IMHO.

As you know by now, it is impossible to please and make happy everyone. There will be always a troop that liked, followed and agreed with the other guy. Actually, that troop may never like, agree and follow a new guy. It happens everywhere. People may say whatever good about Sergio but, not having a solid plan in place, a road map that is now BS, and leaving a structure and organization that "cannot survive without him" is very bad and unacceptable for a supposed great leader. So, he wasn't.

I think that both Imparato and Tavares have the experience, credentials and actually have proven to move car brands and companies forward and being successful. I also think that Alfa Romeo is much bigger than Marchione, Imparato and Tavares, together, and that the Italians will keep it alive and will not sell it to the Chinese.
 

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My personal take is that while on the outside everything was "peachy" with Marchione, I am willing to bet that on his passing Mr. Elkann had a big hand in what transpired next. Just my read.
Not that it matters because "it is what it is" now.
The Agnelli family and ruining the Italian Automotive industry, name me a more iconic duo.
 

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Just look at some of the world's best known car brands like Rolls, Bentley, Volvo, Jaguar, Land Rover, Opel, Lamborghini and even Ferrari. They have been passed around like a joint at a hipster party, yet they continue to exist and thrive under whatever the current ownership is. Brands like these are strong - sticky in marketing parlance. They will always survive, despite the naysayers. Alfa, Maserati, Lancia, Fiat, Peugeot, Jeep, Dodge - they too will continue regardless of the ownership. There is too much value in the brands for them to disappear. Unlike US brands like Oldsmobile and Pontiac which simply had no raison d'être in the grand scheme of GM.
 

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With Panda sales of 7.8 MILLION units sold until the end of 2020 over the whole model career (3 generations) and 2.1 million Fiat 500 cars sold 2007 - 2018 (and still selling well) I'd say that is a bit of an overstatement :).
Thanks for sharing. Data is powerful. As soon as one starts to use data, all the none-sense comments simply collapse.
 

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With Panda sales of 7.8 MILLION units sold until the end of 2020 over the whole model career (3 generations) and 2.1 million Fiat 500 cars sold 2007 - 2018 (and still selling well) I'd say that is a bit of an overstatement :).
Sales do not equate to profitability.

EDIT, I forgot more failures..

1970s - Chrysler staves off bankruptcy with a US Gov't Loan
1998 - Daimler takes over Chrysler ($38B value)
2007 - Daimler sells Chrysler to Cerberus (Private Equity firm) for only $6B
2009 - Chrysler files for bankruptcy
2009 - Marchionne experienced a loss in European market share from 9.3 to 6.2%
2009 - Fiat acquires New Chrysler to access Jeep
2013 - Fiat SpA had -28,000,000,000 EUR of DEBT and had its credit rating cut to Ba3
2014 - FCA created
2015 - FCA spins off part of Ferrari to access needed cash
2019 - FCA agrees to pay -$800-million due to Diesel emissions litigation
2019 - FCA proposes merger with Renault, rescinded.
2019 - FCA merger with PSA announced
2021 - Stellantis completed
 
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Sales do not equate to profitability.

1970s - Chrysler staves off bankruptcy with a US Gov't Loan
2009 - Chrysler files for bankruptcy
2009 - Marchionne experienced a loss in European market share from 9.3 to 6.2%
2009 - Fiat acquires New Chrysler to access Jeep
2013 - Fiat SpA had -28,000,000,000 EUR of DEBT and had its credit rating cut to Ba3
2014 - FCA created
2015 - FCA spins off part of Ferrari to access needed cash
2019 - FCA agrees to pay -$800-million due to Diesel emissions litigation
2019 - FCA proposes merger with Renault, rescinded.
2019 - FCA merger with PSA announced
2021 - Stellantis completed
I think you are missing the specific point here. It was a response to a statement that says that "... Everything Fiat and Chrysler ever touch fail ...". I think that what happened in 2009 happened to GM and Ford, too. It is not a Chrysler related thing. All companies buy and sell brands as part of their financial strategies and/or recoveries. So, it would be more accurate to say that Fiat and Chrysler have performed with both success and failures for decades and have done as good as many of their peers. And that they are not the best, evidently.
 

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Toyota sells a lot of cars. I do not want to buy a Toyota (or a VW or Peugeot).

Ferrari sells a lot fewer cars (and are financially stable). I want a Ferrari.

Nothing against sharing platforms....as long as the platforms are made by the right people.
 

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I think you are missing the specific point here. It was a response to a statement that says that "... Everything Fiat and Chrysler ever touch fail ...". I think that what happened in 2009 happened to GM and Ford, too. It is not a Chrysler related thing. All companies buy and sell brands as part of their financial strategies and/or recoveries. So, it would be more accurate to say that Fiat and Chrysler have performed with both success and failures for decades and have done as good as many of their peers. And that they are not the best, evidently.
They have both failed at each step of the way. I also forgot to mention the Daimler Chysler take over, and then the subsequent sale to Cerberus (for a loss), who then failed again and the company went bankrupt.

Chrysler failed and went bankrupt in 2009. GM failed too, Ford did not take a bail out. Fiat acquired Chrysler (two sinking ships kept afloat by Jeep). Then they still needed to sell part of Ferrari. Then they, and others, got hit with diesel litigation. Now they needed to merge again to stay in business. That is why we have Stellantis.

This is not Fiat conquering other companies. This is Fiat desperate to stay alive acquiring companies to access some portion of their business that it profitable. Now Stellantis exists because FCA and PSA can't do it alone.
 
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They have both failed at each step of the way. I also forgot to mention the Daimler Chysler take over, and then the subsequent sale to Cerberus (for a loss), who then failed again and the company went bankrupt.

Chrysler failed and went bankrupt in 2009. GM failed too, Ford did not take a bail out. Fiat acquired Chrysler (two sinking ships kept afloat by Jeep). Then they still needed to sell part of Ferrari. Then they, and others, got hit with diesel litigation. Now they needed to merge again to stay in business. That is why we have Stellantis.

This is not Fiat conquering other companies. This is Fiat desperate to stay alive acquiring companies to access some portion of their business that it profitable. Now Stellantis exists because FCA and PSA can't do it alone.
My last one on this subject.

No one is saying that Fiat is conquering other companies. That would be another non-sense. What some of us think is that not everything Fiat and Chrysler ever touch fail. And that sales of 7.8M cars over 3 generations of one specific model as well as 2.1M cars sold of another specific model in 10 years is not a failure, more probably. Take overs and sells in cars industry (and any other industry) is a standard these days. I think that FIAT is 122 years old so, being desperate for more than a century is a bit of a misunderstanding, I think. I am convinced that both FCA and PSA would have been in business for long, long time, without the merger. I think that in the global rankings, before the merge, FCA was #10 and PSA was #11, very close to Honda at #9, which is a reasonable place to be. They merge to become bigger and more powerful. It is human. Now, they are #5 I think, with just a signature.

In any case, I am betting to the success of Stellantis and I am sure that I have not seen the last merge or the last sell of a car company to another. And I am praying that it will never happen to Alfa Romeo to the Chinese.
 

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I'm far from saying that Fiat is good with managing car brands, especially the more luxurious ones - like Alfa and Lancia. But it's not that they do EVERYTHING bad. Their biggest sin is being lazy with preparing new models. They either make one model for 10 years or do not present any successors - see Fiat Punto, Alfa MiTo, Alfa Giulietta.
As far as PSA is concerned - they would probably make it easily without FCA.
 

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My last one on this subject.

No one is saying that Fiat is conquering other companies. That would be another non-sense. What some of us think is that not everything Fiat and Chrysler ever touch fail. And that sales of 7.8M cars over 3 generations of one specific model as well as 2.1M cars sold of another specific model in 10 years is not a failure, more probably. Take overs and sells in cars industry (and any other industry) is a standard these days. I think that FIAT is 122 years old so, being desperate for more than a century is a bit of a misunderstanding, I think. I am convinced that both FCA and PSA would have been in business for long, long time, without the merger. I think that in the global rankings, before the merge, FCA was #10 and PSA was #11, very close to Honda at #9, which is a reasonable place to be. They merge to become bigger and more powerful. It is human. Now, they are #5 I think, with just a signature.

In any case, I am betting to the success of Stellantis and I am sure that I have not seen the last merge or the last sell of a car company to another. And I am praying that it will never happen to Alfa Romeo to the Chinese.
Chrysler has always been the worst performing US auto company. Fiat was hemorrhaging money. They joined forces to stave off disaster. They are the equivalent of Alitalia, mismanaged and crippled by unions. In terms of the future of cars, FCA did next to nothing for EVs and PSA was far behind the competition. They have merged again to stave off oblivion. No one will study these companies for examples of how to run a business.

That being said, I am very much looking forward to my Giulia...more so than I expected, thanks to the admiration and zeal of this forum. I knew she was a beauty, but I did not know about the suspension mastery or the other invisible nuances that you all love about the car (especially those of you who have bought multiple).
 

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That being said, I am very much looking forward to my Giulia...more so than I expected, thanks to the admiration and zeal of this forum. I knew she was a beauty, but I did not know about the suspension mastery or the other invisible nuances that you all love about the car (especially those of you who have bought multiple).

"Lightening in a bottle".... Sergio, Ferrari, Alfa.
 
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