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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Granted Giulias are fresh on the market but how is the paint holding up? I read a paint correction thread that the Alfa paint is soft and susceptible to chipping. If I buy one it would sit outside. At the office and at home I have a covered carport.

I'm going to order one but trying to select the best color for my daily needs. I'd prefer black but for practicality I'm considering white or gray.
 

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We've owned our Giulia about six months and have 10,000+ miles on her now. No paint protection and no paint problems.

The soft paint you've read about is on the 4C. The paint is crap. My 4C doesn't have much paint left. I've also got 28,000+ miles on her in almost three years.
 

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I feel it?s a bit thin as well in the Giulia, I have two tiny door scrapes already but they?re both down to bare metal. I had an Mitsubishi run into my old Range Rover and the scratches weren?t down to the metal.

Whoever scratched my Giulia, may your genitals wither and fall away and your children never know joy in life.
 

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Front end seems to be holding up well thus far (fingers-crossed). I have owned it since the middle of May and have about 3500 miles.
 

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2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
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We've owned our Giulia about six months and have 10,000+ miles on her now. No paint protection and no paint problems.

The soft paint you've read about is on the 4C. The paint is crap. My 4C doesn't have much paint left. I've also got 28,000+ miles on her in almost three years.
RacerZ: what colors to you have on your Giulia and 4C? Is the paint on your 4C wearing off or fading (color is gone but paint is still there)?

Not all colors are created equal, so experiences may vary considerably.

On completely different vehicles, my experience is that thick paint tends to be chip prone, single coat metallic paints tend to wear away (I don't think Alfa offers any), and that paint is more likely to fail on body panels that get hot during vehicle operation (e.g. the hoods of some brands).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you all for your response. My C63 and my wife GL paint is darn durable. I'm hopeful the Alfa paint is nearly as trouble free.
 

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Not sure where I read it, but the Cassino plant is the first in the world to meet the next generation environmental requirements for industrial painting. Don't know what that means for the paint quality, but I would assume that latest state-of-the-art equipment would give good results. You can see the painting in this video:
Thin paint is what you want because: 1. It looks better 2. It tracks the expansion of the substrate better and 3. It weighs less. The downside is that it requires more skill to apply and it reveals any flaws in the body more readily. The durability depends on the quality of the paint and the thoroughness of the preparation. I think most high end Italian cars use Glasurit (BASF) paint system.
 

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Not sure where I read it, but the Cassino plant is the first in the world to meet the next generation environmental requirements for industrial painting. Don't know what that means for the paint quality, but I would assume that latest state-of-the-art equipment would give good results. You can see the painting in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5aLPU0eO84U
Thin paint is what you want because: 1. It looks better 2. It tracks the expansion of the substrate better and 3. It weighs less. The downside is that it requires more skill to apply and it reveals any flaws in the body more readily. The durability depends on the quality of the paint and the thoroughness of the preparation. I think most high end Italian cars use Glasurit (BASF) paint system.
That's required viewing, on repeat.

Kanundrum, didn't you guys have the paint measured by the Ammo guy? How many microns or thousandths?
 

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I have a 67 Giulia with original paint.
Thin, faded, and peeling off, in places.
Your results may vary.
 

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Not sure where I read it, but the Cassino plant is the first in the world to meet the next generation environmental requirements for industrial painting. Don't know what that means for the paint quality, but I would assume that latest state-of-the-art equipment would give good results. You can see the painting in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5aLPU0eO84U
Thin paint is what you want because: 1. It looks better 2. It tracks the expansion of the substrate better and 3. It weighs less. The downside is that it requires more skill to apply and it reveals any flaws in the body more readily. The durability depends on the quality of the paint and the thoroughness of the preparation. I think most high end Italian cars use Glasurit (BASF) paint system.
That's required viewing, on repeat.

Kanundrum, didn't you guys have the paint measured by the Ammo guy? How many microns or thousandths?
Incredible video. What would have been a nice touch would be to show the four leaf clover being hand painted on a Quadrifoglio. A fitting end to a fascinating automated process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you for the comments. My 2011 C63 looks brand new. While I really like the C I've always wanted to return to Alfa when it returned to the US.
 

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the biggest issue I have experienced with paint and that includes the Giulia, is that "orange peel" effect...but a really thorough detail (not paint correction) by the fellow who did the clear bra solved that....car is always in a climate controlled garage when not in use.....other than that...I don't wipe it down or clean it after driving...it only gets cleaned when it goes to the detailer. the paint has a beautiful brilliance in sunlight and sparkles at twilight
 

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Not sure where I read it, but the Cassino plant is the first in the world to meet the next generation environmental requirements for industrial painting. Don't know what that means for the paint quality, but I would assume that latest state-of-the-art equipment would give good results. You can see the painting in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5aLPU0eO84U
Thin paint is what you want because: 1. It looks better 2. It tracks the expansion of the substrate better and 3. It weighs less. The downside is that it requires more skill to apply and it reveals any flaws in the body more readily. The durability depends on the quality of the paint and the thoroughness of the preparation. I think most high end Italian cars use Glasurit (BASF) paint system.
I love this video. When I see cars being built, and consider the complexities of what goes into them, I am very glad they are not twice the price.
 

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a good coat of AOI Klasse and Klasse Polish would keep a nice protection, I swear by it used it on my BMW's. Lasts long.
 

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Not sure where I read it, but the Cassino plant is the first in the world to meet the next generation environmental requirements for industrial painting. Don't know what that means for the paint quality, but I would assume that latest state-of-the-art equipment would give good results. You can see the painting in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5aLPU0eO84U
Thin paint is what you want because: 1. It looks better 2. It tracks the expansion of the substrate better and 3. It weighs less. The downside is that it requires more skill to apply and it reveals any flaws in the body more readily. The durability depends on the quality of the paint and the thoroughness of the preparation. I think most high end Italian cars use Glasurit (BASF) paint system.
Excellent video, thank you for posting! So how had not seen that one yet and it was great :smile2:
 

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RacerZ: what colors to you have on your Giulia and 4C? Is the paint on your 4C wearing off or fading (color is gone but paint is still there)?

Not all colors are created equal, so experiences may vary considerably.

On completely different vehicles, my experience is that thick paint tends to be chip prone, single coat metallic paints tend to wear away (I don't think Alfa offers any), and that paint is more likely to fail on body panels that get hot during vehicle operation (e.g. the hoods of some brands).
The Giulia is Montecarlo blue.
The 4C is Alfa Rosso (the darker of the two reds). The paint is chipping off. She lives out-of-doors (almost three years now) and does not appear to be fading or wearing. The nose (facia) is the worst of the chipping. She is my daily with over 28,000 miles. The 4C community seems to agree that this is the worst of the 4C paints as far as chipping and damage.

The Giulia's seem to be using a different paint that is a lot tougher.
 
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