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Welcome my friend! Πολύ κούκλα!
 

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Welcome :smile2:
Congrats :grin2:

We don't have the diesel option here in the USA. How do you like it?
 

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Nice cars and nice names of my Greek friends here. I am Venetian on my mom's side but haven't been to Greece yet. So many names, words, and the dialect in Venice have a heavy Greek influence. A nice stylish influence from the glory days of Byzantium.

Εβίβα! :D
 

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Nice cars and nice names of my Greek friends here. I am Venetian on my mom's side but haven't been to Greece yet. So many names, words, and the dialect in Venice have a heavy Greek influence. A nice stylish influence from the glory days of Byzantium.

Εβίβα! :D
The reverse influence exists in Greece as well! I have been lucky enough to visit Italy and simply said, I need to go back many more times! Greece is beautiful, definitely try to make it out there. I lived there until age 9 before moving to the states. I have visit back almost every year since.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
We don't have the diesel option here in the USA. How do you like it?
Never driven the 280 gasoline version to compare, but definitely fast enough for a family :wink2: car.
I actually calculated, that for a 10y-300kKm period I will save over 30k€ (35k$) in fuel, taxes etc over the gasoline version.
Which means that for a given budget (for this period), even if I had bought the cheapest gasoline giulia I wouldn't have enough money for fuel...
Also, I calculated that if someone revs up to 4000, the diesel is at least as fast as the gasoline, and even if he revs up to 4000 in diesel and 5000 in gasoline the difference is small.
And for the family, revving is not very acceptable.
So buying a gasoline version and going slow so that the family is happier and my pocket remains healthy, is not a sensible option in my opinion.
Any way I will write a full review as soon as I have some time, but for now I'm really content driving this car, it's definitely the best overall "family compatible" car I have ever driven.
 

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Never driven the 280 gasoline version to compare, but definitely fast enough for a family :wink2: car.
I actually calculated, that for a 10y-300kKm period I will save over 30k€ (35k$) in fuel, taxes etc over the gasoline version.
Which means that for a given budget (for this period), even if I had bought the cheapest gasoline giulia I wouldn't have enough money for fuel...
Also, I calculated that if someone revs up to 4000, the diesel is at least as fast as the gasoline, and even if he revs up to 4000 in diesel and 5000 in gasoline the difference is small.
And for the family, revving is not very acceptable.
So buying a gasoline version and going slow so that the family is happier and my pocket remains healthy, is not a sensible option in my opinion.
Any way I will write a full review as soon as I have some time, but for now I'm really content driving this car, it's definitely the best overall "family compatible" car I have ever driven.
35k$ over ten years is a huge chunk of change. Is that savings based on the price of the fuel, the fuel consumption rate, or both? Over here in Los Angeles, diesel cost is slightly more then the best gasoline. We have plenty of diesel cars and trucks, but gasoline still prevails as the favored fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
35k$ over ten years is a huge chunk of change. Is that savings based on the price of the fuel, the fuel consumption rate, or both?
Both, plus the annual taxes that depend on your CO2 emissions.
Gasoline here is ~0.23€/liter=1.05$/gallon more expensive than diesel and has almost 50% higher consumption.
(Also, not calculated here is the much higher price loss for a gasoline car when sold used)
 

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count Hamburg in for banning diesels - but it doesn't apply to vehicles built after the scandal.

Europe encouraged diesel fuel through taxes and regulation, but the preferential treatment seems to be over. watch for higher fuel prices and correspondingly lower resale values as this pendulum swings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Welcome. The price loss may be more for a diesel if some Euro cities go ahead and ban diesel cars as has been proposed.
As long as I know there is absolutely no proposal for banning diesel cars anywhere in Europe.
Instead, there is a proposal (already "approved" by German judicature) to ban old (up to Euro5) diesel cars in some cities.
Which means that if you want to use a diesel car in these cities, you need to buy a Euro6 or newer car.
Which means that Euro6 and newer cars will be more desirable between diesels and as a result more expensive as used...

Anyway, the above does not apply in Athens/Greece, where there is always a lag adapting to modern EU legislation.
Also the main reason for the higher price used diesel cars have, is the longer expected life which remains the same.

count Hamburg in for banning diesels - but it doesn't apply to vehicles built after the scandal.

Europe encouraged diesel fuel through taxes and regulation, but the preferential treatment seems to be over. watch for higher fuel prices and correspondingly lower resale values as this pendulum swings.
That's true, but considering how many years we hear such "threats" and that more expensive diesel will affect directly commercial transportation, I'll take the risk
 
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