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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I put lowering springs on my Guilia QV and car looked a little jacked up in the front so I thought my headlights were aimed up a bit too high Also a few people flashed their brights at me at night one night so I made an appointment with my dealer to get them adjusted.

But we pulled in a brand new Giulia and marked where those headlights hit his toolbox and my headlights were the same! So it was just my imagination.

But I was able to make photo of the instructions. Also it seems you need a 6 mm ball head screwdriver. Thought I would share the info.
 

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I can't quite read the instructions that you posted but...

The height of the headlight spot close to the car should be lower on lowered the car compared to a stock car. What is important is how the light hits the ground around 300 feet from the car. Look at the geometry of the situation and you will see that a lower headlight needs to be closer to parallel to the ground, but closer to the ground from start to finish in order to be "right". If you measure 10' from the car and the lowered and stock cars put the spot at the same height, I think the lowered car's headlights are actually pointed up.

Assuming the headlights are about 22 inches from the ground the rate of fall is about 3600/22 = 1 inch per 13 feet. If your vehicle is lowered 1" and you measure 13' out and the spot height matches, the headlights of the lowered car are aimed exactly level (still not good).

This problem is most commonly encountered in lifted trucks that have old style headlights that are aimed with a level. If you lift a truck by 8" the headlights need to be aimed substantially down relative to the stock angle. Glare is harder to control for the lifted truck as well.
 

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So I put lowering springs on my Guilia QV and car looked a little jacked up in the front so I thought my headlights were aimed up a bit too high Also a few people flashed their brights at me at night one night so I made an appointment with my dealer to get them adjusted.

But we pulled in a brand new Giulia and marked where those headlights hit his toolbox and my headlights were the same! So it was just my imagination.

But I was able to make photo of the instructions. Also it seems you need a 6 mm ball head screwdriver. Thought I would share the info.
Interesting. Last night I was driving home in my brand new Giulia, 100% stock and twice I got flashed by people. It has never happened before with other cars. I wonder if the lights are pointed a bit too high from the factory.
 

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My car came from the factory with the headlights aimed to high. They were shining up way to high. Dealer replaced wntire headlight assembly on both sides.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I can't quite read the instructions that you posted but...

The height of the headlight spot close to the car should be lower on lowered the car compared to a stock car. What is important is how the light hits the ground around 300 feet from the car. Look at the geometry of the situation and you will see that a lower headlight needs to be closer to parallel to the ground, but closer to the ground from start to finish in order to be "right". If you measure 10' from the car and the lowered and stock cars put the spot at the same height, I think the lowered car's headlights are actually pointed up.

Assuming the headlights are about 22 inches from the ground the rate of fall is about 3600/22 = 1 inch per 13 feet. If your vehicle is lowered 1" and you measure 13' out and the spot height matches, the headlights of the lowered car are aimed exactly level (still not good).

This problem is most commonly encountered in lifted trucks that have old style headlights that are aimed with a level. If you lift a truck by 8" the headlights need to be aimed substantially down relative to the stock angle. Glare is harder to control for the lifted truck as well.
Not sure why you can’t read the instructions?!!!
I can view them quite easily I do have to zoom in abit on the words though.

Yeah I was kind of thinking the same thing about the higher car. Would really need the wall screen they talk of in the instructions and then set up 33 feet away from it as they say.

I’m wondering if there is some big fancy headlight adjustment tool similar to what they use for adjusting the radar for lane detection and adaptive cruise control?

Maybe easier if I just have a dealership salesman turn on some new Giulia headlights outside at night and we shine it on something to see if they’re similar height. I think the 33 feet away figure is all you need. Maybe I’ll do it at a longer distance also but would be pretty hard to see. Maybe better for the long distance check to just stand that far away from the car and look at which cars headlights blind you if any.

I did measure the top of the fender well to the center of each wheel and my car is a bit jacked up relative to the measurements of a stock QV.
My fronts: 14.25
Stock fronts 15”
(my oversized tires are .2 inches taller that the stock tires)

My rears: 13.5“
Stock fronts 15”
(my oversized tires are .5 inches taller that the stock tires)

I don’t think my oversized tires figure into it too much because you have to divide that in half for the extra distance

It’s funny driven the car at night quite a bit since then and I haven’t had anybody else flash their lights on me. Maybe it was just that one night with 2-3 people doing it that caused me to go into some hysteria?

If I get flashed a bunch more I’ll do that test I talked of with a stock dealership car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So I put lowering springs on my Guilia QV and car looked a little jacked up in the front so I thought my headlights were aimed up a bit too high Also a few people flashed their brights at me at night one night so I made an appointment with my dealer to get them adjusted.

But we pulled in a brand new Giulia and marked where those headlights hit his toolbox and my headlights were the same! So it was just my imagination.

But I was able to make photo of the instructions. Also it seems you need a 6 mm ball head screwdriver. Thought I would share the info.
Interesting. Last night I was driving home in my brand new Giulia, 100% stock and twice I got flashed by people. It has never happened before with other cars. I wonder if the lights are pointed a bit too high from the factory.
I wouldn’t freak out as it could be nothing. You read my latest post I think I got kind of into a hysteria and may have talked myself into believing there was a problem.

The high-performance Bi-Xeon the US cars come with are brighter and for superior to most cars headlights on the road. Some people see brighter headlights and automatically think they’re aimed too high or you’re on your high beams. My tech even suggested that they might be jealous!

But I will admit it’s not fun knowing. I Think I’m going to swap cars with my wife on this straightaway near our house and have her drive by me in my Giulia then compare that to what I see when she drives by me in her newer Merc that also has high performance headlights but I know is not too high.
 

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I'm a +1 on the stock headlights being too high. Bone stock 2WD TI on stock 19" and get an oncoming car flashing their hi's every other week. And no, I do not have auto-hi beams active at the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Oh my It is so easy to adjust the headlights up and down if you have the exact tool.

So tonight I had another one or two people flashed thier brights at me. So I went to a straightaway on a rural road with no traffic and I got out and got about 75 feet away and realized my headlights did seem a bit too high. If I stood up and it seemed OK but when I squatted down to about eye level in a normal car it got quite a bit brighter so it’s too high.

So then I went into my garage turned off the lights and put a tape on the wall where my low beams lights were. I then got out my specialty tool (a 6mm ball head long screwdriver) that I had ordered and opened the hood and looked in the holes in the front with a flashlight and I saw exactly where I needed to stick the tool.

The tool slid exactly into that screw that is about 5 inches below the surface. I marked the top of my screwdriver and turned the screw and I could see the headlight beam going up or down. I turned the screwdriver one whole turn and that lowered it enough it seems. I’ll test it out again out on the rural road I’ll just bring the tool with me.

Its so easy with that tool and if you did not have that tool you would not be able to do it as the screw is at a bit of an angle you need that ball head or you’re going to strip out the screw head which seems to be plastic. Bought my tool on Amazon for about $12. So easy to adjust them!

And it does seem possible that some of these Giulia cars come with the headlights adjusted to high. But I never had anybody flash their brights at me before I put my lowering springs on. I would suggest if a lot of other cars are flashing their brights at you often that you just buy one of these cheap tools and turn them down a little yourself as I did.
 

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Not sure why you can’t read the instructions?!!!
I can view them quite easily I do have to zoom in abit on the words though.

Yeah I was kind of thinking the same thing about the higher car. Would really need the wall screen they talk of in the instructions and then set up 33 feet away from it as they say.

I’m wondering if there is some big fancy headlight adjustment tool similar to what they use for adjusting the radar for lane detection and adaptive cruise control?

Maybe easier if I just have a dealership salesman turn on some new Giulia headlights outside at night and we shine it on something to see if they’re similar height. I think the 33 feet away figure is all you need. Maybe I’ll do it at a longer distance also but would be pretty hard to see. Maybe better for the long distance check to just stand that far away from the car and look at which cars headlights blind you if any.

I did measure the top of the fender well to the center of each wheel and my car is a bit jacked up relative to the measurements of a stock QV.
My fronts: 14.25
Stock fronts 15”
(my oversized tires are .2 inches taller that the stock tires)

My rears: 13.5“
Stock fronts 15”
(my oversized tires are .5 inches taller that the stock tires)

I don’t think my oversized tires figure into it too much because you have to divide that in half for the extra distance

It’s funny driven the car at night quite a bit since then and I haven’t had anybody else flash their lights on me. Maybe it was just that one night with 2-3 people doing it that caused me to go into some hysteria?

If I get flashed a bunch more I’ll do that test I talked of with a stock dealership car.
OK, to zoom in on your pictures I click the thumbnail, double click the expanded picture, then click that again. At least my browser will not let me use gestures to expand the image. Anyway, the instructions are not quite right but should be close enough if the change in height of the vehicle was not excessive.

In another thread I estimated that a 0.25" change in the relative height of the axles is enough to cause excessive glare. You have 3 times that amount.

Finding 10 meters + a car length of dead flat, dead level pavement is not trivial. My oversize garage floor isn't long enough. Some commercial garages will have enough space, at least if you can get the whole garage to yourself. I would think that you want to use a wall to project the lights onto, since a projection screen is usually not flat and not wide enough. Determining the location of the reference points on the headlights is going to be difficult. You have 19" wheels, can you measure something that is 19" apart on your wheels? It's a similarly vague situation with the headlights. You probably need to know the location of the center of the projection lens, but that lens is behind another lens.

A perhaps more accurate method to aim headlights it to measure the spot positions at two different distances from the target and then do the geometry to figure out if the top of the spot will hit the ground at about 300' out. This unfortunately is an iterative process since the height of the spot at both distances will change when the headlights are adjusted. This problem can be minimized by making one measurement as close to the car as possible.
 

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I'm a +1 on the stock headlights being too high. Bone stock 2WD TI on stock 19" and get an oncoming car flashing their hi's every other week. And no, I do not have auto-hi beams active at the time.
Do you have the standard headlights or the optional advanced headlights? IIHS failed the standard headlights largely because of excessive glare. It is unclear if that was due to mis-adjustment or a design issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Not sure why you can’t read the instructions?!!!
I can view them quite easily I do have to zoom in abit on the words though.

Yeah I was kind of thinking the same thing about the higher car. Would really need the wall screen they talk of in the instructions and then set up 33 feet away from it as they say.

I’m wondering if there is some big fancy headlight adjustment tool similar to what they use for adjusting the radar for lane detection and adaptive cruise control?

Maybe easier if I just have a dealership salesman turn on some new Giulia headlights outside at night and we shine it on something to see if they’re similar height. I think the 33 feet away figure is all you need. Maybe I’ll do it at a longer distance also but would be pretty hard to see. Maybe better for the long distance check to just stand that far away from the car and look at which cars headlights blind you if any.

I did measure the top of the fender well to the center of each wheel and my car is a bit jacked up relative to the measurements of a stock QV.
My fronts: 14.25
Stock fronts 15”
(my oversized tires are .2 inches taller that the stock tires)

My rears: 13.5“
Stock fronts 15”
(my oversized tires are .5 inches taller that the stock tires)

I don’t think my oversized tires figure into it too much because you have to divide that in half for the extra distance

It’s funny driven the car at night quite a bit since then and I haven’t had anybody else flash their lights on me. Maybe it was just that one night with 2-3 people doing it that caused me to go into some hysteria?

If I get flashed a bunch more I’ll do that test I talked of with a stock dealership car.
OK, to zoom in on your pictures I click the thumbnail, double click the expanded picture, then click that again. At least my browser will not let me use gestures to expand the image. Anyway, the instructions are not quite right but should be close enough if the change in height of the vehicle was not excessive.

In another thread I estimated that a 0.25" change in the relative height of the axles is enough to cause excessive glare. You have 3 times that amount.

Finding 10 meters + a car length of dead flat, dead level pavement is not trivial. My oversize garage floor isn't long enough. Some commercial garages will have enough space, at least if you can get the whole garage to yourself. I would think that you want to use a wall to project the lights onto, since a projection screen is usually not flat and not wide enough. Determining the location of the reference points on the headlights is going to be difficult. You have 19" wheels, can you measure something that is 19" apart on your wheels? It's a similarly vague situation with the headlights. You probably need to know the location of the center of the projection lens, but that lens is behind another lens.

A perhaps more accurate method to aim headlights it to measure the spot positions at two different distances from the target and then do the geometry to figure out if the top of the spot will hit the ground at about 300' out. This unfortunately is an iterative process since the height of the spot at both distances will change when the headlights are adjusted. This problem can be minimized by making one measurement as close to the car as possible.
My headlights are so close to being spot on I’m just doing it the old fashion way of turning them down a little bit at a time bit and then parking my car with the headlights on at night and looking at them from a distance. When you get about 75-100 feet away and look at your car’s lowbeams you can really tell a lot.

As you stand up and then squat down while looking at your low beam headlights you’ll notice there’s a definitive line where the lights get a lot brighter and you want that line to be below the eyes of someone in a regular standard car.

I’ll know when I get it right when it looks good to me and also people don’t flash their brights at me anymore. I think with the one turn that I did of that screw that I’m probably there right now.
 

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FWIW, I was able to adjust my headlights tonight using a simple ball end Allen key.
Relatively simple adjustment procedure. Aimed the headlights at our 100 yd gun range, and knocked them both down a good 3 feet.
More adjustments may be needed, but it's a super simple fix.
 

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The important bit of missing information:

Turn the key counterclockwise to lower the aim. A full turn is a pretty large adjustment, a 1/4 turn is a small adjustment.
 

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just for some additional info, this shows the adjustment screws :
headlights.pdf
Really interesting. I see that this document mentions fog lights but that they aren't compatable with the "Mid Level" and "Premium" headlights. It mentioned that this is becuase they have LEDs. Maybe this is a regulatory issue? The best I can tell the "Mid Level" is the standard option here in the US. and the "Premium" is the High performance Bi-Xenon Headlights that are standard on the quad and optional on the Ti Sport.


I'm a tad OCD... so to me that means folks with the "Basic" (standard?) headlights in Europe get more buttons on the headlight layout. I've always thought there was a knob missing! Turns out there is. And it would appear that it adjusts the level of your headlights. I would love that feature on my Giulia Ti Sport with the Bi-Xenon High Performance Headlights.
 

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just for some additional info, this shows the adjustment screws :
headlights.pdf
Really interesting. I see that this document mentions fog lights but that they aren't compatable with the "Mid Level" and "Premium" headlights. It mentioned that this is becuase they have LEDs. Maybe this is a regulatory issue? The best I can tell the "Mid Level" is the standard option here in the US. and the "Premium" is the High performance Bi-Xenon Headlights that are standard on the quad and optional on the Ti Sport.


I'm a tad OCD... so to me that means folks with the "Basic" (standard?) headlights in Europe get more buttons on the headlight layout. I've always thought there was a knob missing! Turns out there is. And it would appear that it adjusts the level of your headlights. I would love that feature on my Giulia Ti Sport with the Bi-Xenon High Performance Headlights.
HIDs have to be self leveling as per regulations....concern is excesive glare from unleveled lights
 

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Have a long 6mm ball head and decided to lower the passenger side headlight a little bit as it was a bit higher than the driver's side. Bummer, appears that someone (dealer upon delivery, factory, ??) "stripped" those nylon adjusters before I got the car. I can probably figure out something to turn them, but certainly disappointing. You would think that something as critical as headlight adjusters would have been designed to be more robust. Probably a major labor job to replace the adjusters..
 

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just for some additional info, this shows the adjustment screws :
headlights.pdf
My goodness, the headlamps are complicated components! But, the premium 35 watt Bi-Xenon lamps on my Giulia, are by far, the best headlamps that I have ever driven!
 
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Looks like I'm in the same boat as the OP. Drivers side is aimed up to signal Airplanes, it does illuminate freeway signs nicely. Tried the adjustment with the correct tool and no dice, passenger side moves with turns but drivers side just spins and no movement at all. UGH, I love this car but so far the dealer has had it as much as I have. Bringing it in Thursday, hopefully not for 2 weeks again!
 
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