Alfa Romeo Giulia Forum banner
1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is my list of tips and suggestions for the quirks/things I’ve noticed so far about my Giulia Ti. I assume these can apply to the base and even the Quadrifoglio models. Feel free to add any I missed and/or corrections. 1st thread started so bear with me fam.

Tire pressure
Most delivered Giulias seem to have tires way overinflated. This will wear your tires much faster everyone should check their tire pressures. Under apps it will show what the computer reads, it is quite accurate and depending on the weather could change a few PSI especially going from winter to summer. 35-36 psi front 34-35 rear I believe are the correct pressures, check inside the driver door panel to see exact PSI numbers.
TL;DR: check your tire pressure.

License Plate Installation
Rear plate install – You would think this would be an easy one – screw in all 4 screws into the plate with an optional frame and you’re done right? Nope. Although the dealer is technically suppose to put your plates on for you, I like to take these minute details into my own hands (and avoid a tacky dealer plate frame). Unlike most of the world with sleek & thin good looking plates, here in the US we have hideous fat rectangle licenses plates. To install the rear plate you are only able to screw the top 2 screws. I tried putting on a mounting bracket but still was unable to screw it in to the bottom plug caps (don’t try they won’t unscrew, trust me). I believe the best solution is to get a sturdy plate frame that allows you to screw in the top 2 and also hooks the plate into the frame from the bottom ensuring you don’t cover up any lettering at all on the bottom (check your local state laws, any letters covered up is a violation in most states), Adding a piece of Velcro on the back will ensure it doesn’t rattle when you close your trunk or pump the bass to the point of shaking the rear (please don’t, we want to make a good impression as new Alfa drivers). I was told the soft Velcro in this case would be better than the stiff Velcro you would apply an EZ pass to.
TL;DR: Screw your plate on

Front plate
Dealerships in states that require a front plate should provide a plate bracket which I believe would go over the driver side. I personally think it looks better over the passenger side so I ordered the plate mounting bracket from Alfa 9 supply, very high quality. To install remove the tow hook cover by firmly pressing on the top, then once off just slide the little clip attachment off from a plastic string thing. The rest of the directions would come with the kit. Easy install overall and looks as good as a front plate on a Giulia would. Pays for itself immediately as a front plate violation would be around $100. Yes, in my area they will ticket you for this - yes, even in an Alfa.
TL;DR: Front plate on an Alfa…you’re joking right?

Start Engine
My process every time I start my Giulia. Put on seatbelt (to avoid the chime), turn on engine, turn off parking assist (if not needed, cross traffic alert will still be active when reversing), turn off auto-start stop (not needed IMO), release parking break, then shift into drive or reverse. Hopefully FCA comes out with a software update to enable the start-stop and parking assist to last mode user selected when the car turns off then on.
TL;DR: Turn on the car

Breaking
When coming to a complete stop in traffic this requires a firm yet subtle feel which takes some getting use to. To avoid jerky stops as you’re are about to come to a halt release a tiny bit of pressure just being stopping then reapply as needed smoothly to avoid coming to an abrupt stop. It takes some getting use to and I’m sure as your breaks start to wear in it will get better overtime. I do not recommend using your left foot to break as this is improper and dangerous as if you step on the break and gas simultaneously you will jolt forward. (hopefully auto breaking will take precedent over gas but not willing to find out – more on this later).
TL;DR: Press the break petal to break

Window Tinting
Unfortunately, much like certain Audis a few years back the amp and wires in the trunk are not covered and susceptible to damage from water gliding along the bottom shelf of the rear window when tint is applied. Thanks to this forum and the generous contributions of multiple members (especially billeee) they have provided extremely useful tips on how to do tinting to make sure no damage is done and you’re not in silence for 3 weeks while an amp is on international back order (sorry to those it happened to). Amp is located on the driver side rear of trunk. To remove the trunk liner there are 2 screw fasteners one located on the ceiling of the trunk one on the upper side, remove both of these (I used a flathead screwdriver and pried the screws out and gently pull back the trunk liner as there is some sort of string that you cannot remove. Stuff towels and whatever absorbent items you can around the amp, wires and wherever else you can to avoid getting water on anything. My tint guy also located a small opening which I stuffed a paper towel and taped shut as we think this is where the water will travel down. I did this on the right side as well just to be sure (much easier to access just take off the removable cover.) I also made it very clear to my installer to minimize the amount of water on the bottom rear window shelf. Once all is said and done, leave the towels in there, drive around making a few sharp turns to drain any remaining water still leftover in the shelf. Remove the towels put back the trunk liner and voila!, you’re done. Turn on the radio and if you hear music then you should be good to go. Be sure to tip your tint installer if they went through all of this without any problems.
TL;DR: Tell your tint guy to cover the amp

Tailgating
Fairly simple, it’s against the law and a 5 point violation depending where you live so don’t do it! With the Giulia it has autonomous breaking and lets out a loud (and rather heart pounding chime) that alerts you when the car in front of you in moving slow enough to cause a rear-end collision on your part. I experience this chime maybe once or twice a week, it certainly does wake you up. So if grandpa in front of you is slowly turning his boat-sized caddy right and you go to pass him it could possibly chime and I even experienced my Giulia break for me as it sensed the car turning in front of me wasn’t quite turning fast enough as I approached to pass slightly oarondleft to go around (perhaps just got too close for comfort for the car as I didn’t want to be too in the way of potential on-coming traffic). First time I had a car break for me even though I wasn’t going to hit anything. You can turn this feature off but I think I’ll leave it on...just incase. So my point here is always leave a few extra car lengths in front of you as most drivers should anyway since tailgating is the #1 cause of accidents.
TL;DR: Don’t tailgate a hole

Miscellaneous items
-USB charging port in center console and rear middle back seats - yay for backseat phone huggers, just don’t leave anything plugged in as I don’t know if it would drain the battery.
-Small storage cubby on the left side of steering wheel
-Sport seats, when exiting the vehicle try not to put pressure on the bolster on the left side. I can see already this would be the first part of the sport seat cushion to wear so try to not use it for leverage when exiting the vehicle and it will stay nice and sturdy.

What else am I missing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,807 Posts
Front Plate

I told my dealer I would not accept delivery on the car if the front bumper was drilled for a plate...NY requires front and rear plates....I'll take my chances...the car will never be parked on the street so I think I'll be OK...
 
  • Like
Reactions: FNM

·
Vendor
Joined
·
619 Posts
I told my dealer I would not accept delivery on the car if the front bumper was drilled for a plate...NY requires front and rear plates....I'll take my chances...the car will never be parked on the street so I think I'll be OK...
Agreed, I refuse to add a front plate. It really disrupts the front end of the car. I have not run a front plate on any of my cars for years.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Alfa in Vegas

·
Registered
2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
Joined
·
7,729 Posts
A couple of points:

1) If you have a "standard" Giulia, install your front license plate over the lower left front blanking grill. Unlike the right front grill, this one has no sensors behind it. You may need to make a bracket, use standoffs and/or shave the top and bottom of the plate slightly to make it fit. If you have a Quadrifoglio and you get a fix it ticket, cry. I see maybe 5% of cars in California with no front plate (including my now-sold Jag E-type), so maybe you can get away with it here...

2) If you can, get a black background license plate. It should nearly disappear when installed over the left front blanking grill. You can get one by paying a $50/year premium on your registration in California.

3) If you do install a front plate using the Alfa9 bracket or similar on the left side, make certain the plate is sufficiently clear of the sensors.

4) Don't break your Giulia, brake it. Those are two completely different activities.

5) The front bumper is a big ugly metal bar hidden behind the painted plastic front or rear fascia (an Italian word pronounced fa-schia with a "short" a in "fa", https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fascia_(car) ). Drilling into the front bumper would compromise crash worthiness and accomplish nothing.

6) Tailgating is necessary to be able to pass on two lane (one lane each way) mountain highways since passing zones are often extremely short, turnouts are even shorter and many slow drivers speed up when they reach the straighter sections of most passing zones. Don't tailgate in freeway traffic unless you have a death wish and don't care about taking others with you. If someone is tailgating you on a two lane highway, use the available turnouts and stay to the right (for us right side of the road drivers) of your lane; the former is the law in California, the later is a courtesy.

Has anybody tried fitting a FIAM air horn? IMO: it just isn't a real Italian car without an Italian air horn! This should be an order-able option, if not standard. 1969 Fiat 124 had them, it was one of that car's better features.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
A couple of points:

1) If you have a "standard" Giulia, install your front license plate over the lower left front blanking grill. Unlike the right front grill, this one has no sensors behind it. You may need to make a bracket, use standoffs and/or shave the top and bottom of the plate slightly to make it fit. If you have a Quadrifoglio and you get a fix it ticket, cry. I see maybe 5% of cars in California with no front plate (including my now-sold Jag E-type), so maybe you can get away with it here...

2) If you can, get a black background license plate. It should nearly disappear when installed over the left front blanking grill. You can get one by paying a $50/year premium on your registration in California.

3) If you do install a front plate using the Alfa9 bracket or similar on the left side, make certain the plate is sufficiently clear of the sensors.

4) Don't break your Giulia, brake it. Those are two completely different activities.

5) The front bumper is a big ugly metal bar hidden behind the painted plastic front or rear fascia (an Italian word pronounced fa-schia with a "short" a in "fa", https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fascia_(car) ). Drilling into the front bumper would compromise crash worthiness and accomplish nothing.

6) Tailgating is necessary to be able to pass on two lane (one lane each way) mountain highways since passing zones are often extremely short, turnouts are even shorter and many slow drivers speed up when they reach the straighter sections of most passing zones. Don't tailgate in freeway traffic unless you have a death wish and don't care about taking others with you. If someone is tailgating you on a two lane highway, use the available turnouts and stay to the right (for us right side of the road drivers) of your lane; the former is the law in California, the later is a courtesy.

Has anybody tried fitting a FIAM air horn? IMO: it just isn't a real Italian car without an Italian air horn! This should be an order-able option, if not standard. 1969 Fiat 124 had them, it was one of that car's better features.
When you reference left/right, is that driver/passenger?
 

·
Registered
2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
Joined
·
7,729 Posts
When you reference left/right, is that driver/passenger?
It means the left (port) side of the car. The right (starboard) side of the car has sensors in the lower grill, the mounting points for some of which can be seen as flat spots in the pattern on the grill. There is a thread on this subject in the forums, with illustrations. Which side is the passenger/driver side is different depending on the country the car is delivered to but the sensors in the grill are always on the right.

Quadrifoglio has a large vent (for the brakes?) on the outer portion of both of the lower grills, leaving insufficient room to mount a US/Canada/(Mexico?) shaped license plate over the grill without obstructing something. In the rest of the world the license plates have different proportions and can be fitted fairly neatly against the fascia between the lower grills and the headlights.

I suppose since this is a North America specific subject due to the N.A. shaped license plate, it would be correct to say that the plate would go over the driver's side lower grill.

FWIW: Rumor has it that Romans traveled on the left side of the road because they were mostly right handed and that gave them an advantage if they needed to draw a weapon (peasants on the right?). Note that Italy had travel on the left side of the road until after WWII. When the French rejected everything imperialistic in the French Revolution (1792?) they decided that travel should be on the peasants' right side of the road (the "fraternity" part of their motto). The British however apparently never got over the invasion by the Romans and maintain their 2000 year old bad habit, spreading it where ever they got a chance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,807 Posts
US plates

From what I've seen in the US (NY at least)...plate gets mounted on the driver side below the headlight and above the horizontal Alfa eyebrow (bottom part of the grill)....simply...HIDEOUS
 
  • Like
Reactions: Alfa in Vegas

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Anyone have a photo of where the amp is?
I pulled my cover off and it looks like it's at the back of the car near the tail light, vs. under the rear window.
Doesn't seem that it could get wet.

Could it be they relocated it, or is mine only there because I have the HK upgrade?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
Joined
·
7,729 Posts
Anyone have a photo of where the amp is?
I pulled my cover off and it looks like it's at the back of the car near the tail light, vs. under the rear window.
Doesn't seem that it could get wet.

Could it be they relocated it, or is mine only there because I have the HK upgrade?

Thanks
According to other posts the water follows a very circuitous route to get into the amp. I believe you have correctly identified it's location. I'll probably avoid the H-K system, for me it is just extra weight; I ruined my hearing long ago...

In my post above, I incorrectly stated that the Alfa9 plate holder goes on the left side; it actually goes on the right side, above the sensors. Sorry about any confusion that I may have caused.
 

·
Registered
2019 Rosso Competizione Stelvio Ti Sport Nero Edizione
Joined
·
651 Posts
I posted this info in both the 'First Year Jitters" thread and the separate thread dedicated to front license plate holder issues. Since it is coming up again here, I figured I'd post it here as well (sorry for the overkill if you've already seen this).
When I picked up my Giulia Ti, it beeped incessantly. It was maddening. Ultimately, we figured out the license plate holder was interfering with the Parksense sensor on the driver's side, because it had a small overhang. The dealer told me this had become a recurring issue, and a service bulletin had been issued by Alfa. They ultimately installed a new license plate frame that mounts somewhat higher and is slightly smaller. It has no overhang. It doesn't look completely terrible (but it definitely ain't good!) Problem solved.
The flat plate frame has a round piece like a small hockey puck that sticks out the back and plugs snuggly into the opening when you pop out the small round cover on the driver's side of the bumper (the companion to the tow hook opening). It holds the license plate in place along with a few screws into the bumper (gasp!)
You can see the wider, original license plate frame in this picture. I don't have a picture of the new one (it looks almost identical), because I'm too busy enjoying my Giulia now that it has finally stopped beeeeeeeeeping.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
A couple of points:

1) If you have a "standard" Giulia, install your front license plate over the lower left front blanking grill. Unlike the right front grill, this one has no sensors behind it. You may need to make a bracket, use standoffs and/or shave the top and bottom of the plate slightly to make it fit. If you have a Quadrifoglio and you get a fix it ticket, cry. I see maybe 5% of cars in California with no front plate (including my now-sold Jag E-type), so maybe you can get away with it here...

2) If you can, get a black background license plate. It should nearly disappear when installed over the left front blanking grill. You can get one by paying a $50/year premium on your registration in California.

3) If you do install a front plate using the Alfa9 bracket or similar on the left side, make certain the plate is sufficiently clear of the sensors.

4) Don't break your Giulia, brake it. Those are two completely different activities.

5) The front bumper is a big ugly metal bar hidden behind the painted plastic front or rear fascia (an Italian word pronounced fa-schia with a "short" a in "fa", https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fascia_(car) ). Drilling into the front bumper would compromise crash worthiness and accomplish nothing.

6) Tailgating is necessary to be able to pass on two lane (one lane each way) mountain highways since passing zones are often extremely short, turnouts are even shorter and many slow drivers speed up when they reach the straighter sections of most passing zones. Don't tailgate in freeway traffic unless you have a death wish and don't care about taking others with you. If someone is tailgating you on a two lane highway, use the available turnouts and stay to the right (for us right side of the road drivers) of your lane; the former is the law in California, the later is a courtesy.

Has anybody tried fitting a FIAM air horn? IMO: it just isn't a real Italian car without an Italian air horn! This should be an order-able option, if not standard. 1969 Fiat 124 had them, it was one of that car's better features.

1,2 – I initially wanted to put the plate in the grill section but I feel that would compromise air flow entering the front end.

3 – Front plate bracket from Alfa9 works perfect and doesn’t block any sensors.

4 – Brake* :eek:

5 – Agreed, no need to drill at all into the front bumper. Period.

6 – I reduced the sensitivity of the automated braking* system I believe from 3 to 2 in the system safely settings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
527 Posts
Tire pressure
Most delivered Giulias seem to have tires way overinflated. This will wear your tires much faster everyone should check their tire pressures. Under apps it will show what the computer reads, it is quite accurate and depending on the weather could change a few PSI especially going from winter to summer. 35-36 psi front 34-35 rear I believe are the correct pressures, check inside the driver door panel to see exact PSI numbers.
TL;DR: check your tire pressure.
This, so much this.

The 55psi that the car came with was laughably high. Tramlined and generally pranced on the freeway.
Dropped it down and it handled much better.
 

·
Registered
2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
Joined
·
7,729 Posts
This, so much this.

The 55psi that the car came with was laughably high. Tramlined and generally pranced on the freeway.
Dropped it down and it handled much better.
Similar thing on my Subaru. The tires as delivered were inflated well above the tire manufacturer's maximum inflation pressure, creating a serious safety hazard. Have you ever seen what happens when an over inflated tire "lets go"? It is not good, rather like a bomb going off.

Rims have a maximum tire inflation pressure too (example: my truck's tires max pressure is 115 PSI, while the rims are rated 95 PSI) and if the rim "lets go" it is much worse than a tire failure.

Is there some reason why companies might over inflate tires for shipping?
 

·
Registered
2017 Giulia Ti Sport Q4, Vesuvio Grey, Red Calipers, Red Leather interior, Every Option!!
Joined
·
69 Posts
High tire pressures

I am a current FCA employee and when the tires are initially put onto the car at the factory the tires are inflated to the max allowable tire pressure for the specific tire being installed onto the automobile for its delivery. (not exactly sure the reason, sorry) The dealers are suppose to lower the tire pressure to the 'proper' driving pressure when they receive the auto!? That's all I got
 

·
Registered
2020 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sport Ti AWD
Joined
·
7,469 Posts
I am a current FCA employee and when the tires are initially put onto the car at the factory the tires are inflated to the max allowable tire pressure for the specific tire being installed onto the automobile for its delivery. (not exactly sure the reason, sorry) The dealers are suppose to lower the tire pressure to the 'proper' driving pressure when they receive the auto!? That's all I got
Some answers here, Dr: http://www.giuliaforums.com/forum/602-wheel-tires/11785-tire-beware.html

I imagine you could develop quite a fan club here by connecting people in need of help with appropriate FCA contacts.
 

·
Registered
2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
Joined
·
7,729 Posts
I am a current FCA employee and when the tires are initially put onto the car at the factory the tires are inflated to the max allowable tire pressure for the specific tire being installed onto the automobile for its delivery. (not exactly sure the reason, sorry) The dealers are suppose to lower the tire pressure to the 'proper' driving pressure when they receive the auto!? That's all I got
Thanks. However, in the case of my Subaru the tires were inflated well over the max pressure rating. Tirerack reports that Pirelli P-Zeros have a max pressure of 51PSI, while Giulia owners are reporting 55-59PSI actual pressure. Perhaps the air source that is used at the factory to inflate the new tires is much higher than 50PSI, so that the air enters the tire very cold, then the pressure increases when it warms up to "room temperature"?

Of course, the tires have margin built in for an increase in temperature and/or elevation during operation. However, if you go for an aggressive drive on a hot day when your tires were overinflated cold, you could easily have a big problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
I am a current FCA employee and when the tires are initially put onto the car at the factory the tires are inflated to the max allowable tire pressure for the specific tire being installed onto the automobile for its delivery. (not exactly sure the reason, sorry) The dealers are suppose to lower the tire pressure to the 'proper' driving pressure when they receive the auto!? That's all I got
In case the cars are kept in storage and not driven for an extended period, it helps prevent the tyres from flat spotting.
 

·
Registered
2017 Giulia Ti Sport Q4, Vesuvio Grey, Red Calipers, Red Leather interior, Every Option!!
Joined
·
69 Posts
Casino --
That does make sense! Thank you!!
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top