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Discussion Starter · #101 ·
I am a new 2.0 literGuilia owner, I rate the Giulia fit and finish among the best on any new car that I was shopping for. I cross shopped Audi BMW Lexus Acura VW Mazda Cadillac Subaru Merc, and my mom just bought a Tesla (The worst by a mile!). Alfa is easily top 3 in quality from what I saw. ...... Shit happens, but is don’t think build quality is something us Giulia owners have to worry about.

I am 100% satisfied so far (3 months and 3000 miles). I feel I made the right choice!!
I agree with you about the 4 cylinders!
 

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Discussion Starter · #102 ·
The port of Zebrugge in Belgium is the largest car handling port in the world - 2.8 million cars per year - and I believe it is used by Alfa Romeo.

The port has onsite car crash repair facilities so that cars damaged in transit do not have to be returned to the manufacturer for repair. Perhaps this car was damaged in transit and badly repaired at Zebrugge or elsewhere.
In my case "No"! The car was produced on May 25, shipped from Italy to Germany and arrived 4 weeks later at the dealer. I guess a repair in between is unlikely.
 

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Yes, I got a huge discount too, The major topic is that the strikers of the left and right side of the vehicle are too different.
The fit and finish on my 2019 QV in Rossa Alfa is perfect, although I saw several at different dealers in different colors that did have more variation in the body gaps, and in the feel of the seat side bolsters, for some reason (same type seats). I have told this story before, but, I had a lot of fit and finish problems with my previous vehicle, a 217 Cadillac CTS-V, in which the front passenger door took more effort to close and was out of alignment, and adjusting the strike plate just made the alignment worse. About a year and a half after I bought the car, my suspicions when I was purchasing it that the car had had front end repair were again brought to my attention with evidence from the dealership I had been using for service after I asked them if they could make any adjustments. After about two weeks of investigation between that dealership and the selling dealership, which denied any knowledge or history of such a problem, Cadillac said I needed to write a letter to the Southeast division and start over again--what baloney. But the CTS-V had other issues with the torque converter causing vibration, a known issue with that transmission, that were never permanently fixed and came back worse. I was going to trade it in for the next year model which had end of model year incentives, and although I had just seen a newly arrived 2018 in service that someone had ordered, identical to what I would order, that looked perfect when I examined it carefully, when my order came in six weeks later, it had worse hood/fender alignment and other gap issues than my current car, plus the driver side door was harder to close and out of alignment, similar to the front passenger door of my then-current vehicle, and on moderate acceleration in the test drive the gear changes clunked (my current had no such transmission issues), so it was worse than the one I was trying to trade in. Like your QV, they tried to blame the hood/fender misalignment on the carbon fiber hood and the different molding of the fenders for the CTS-V (although the car I had seen six weeks before was perfect). Needless to say, I rejected the car, and about a month later they called me to say two engineers from Cadillac came down to look at the car, and said it never should have left the factory that way, it missed a last step, or something, but I don't believe it. They did adjust the door with the a shim in the hinge, which is how it should have been done on my original car, but the service and body shop didn't seem to be competent enough to do that--that's probably how the car door gap on your QV should be adjusted, rather than moving the strike plate (or maybe adjusting the hinge and moving the strike plate, whichever one is irregular, back to the proper position). However they couldn't fix the other gap issues and the transmission still wasn't right, so even though they gave me yet more incentives I passed, and traded my CTS-V in for the QV. Those problems with two V series Cadillacs in a row would make me very hesitant to their latest view offering assuming I didn't already have the QV. Unless, perhaps, I was more thorough in my inspection and evaluation of the car first, and do not discount fit and finish problems as perhaps little quality control issues, because, aside from being anathema to aesthetic sensibility, they could be indications of something more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #105 ·
Yesterday, I picked my QV from the dealer.

To correct all the body gaps, the front doors (so that the fenders can be removed), both fenders and the bumper have been removed. The body shop removed a little bit material of the fenders in the area of the A-pillar to do not hit the A-pillars again.
All the body parts were reassembled pretty accurately regarding the gap dimensions.
The right door was repainted due to a plant paint mistake.
The hood was also adjusted again (at first, the dealer told me it is impossible).
Now, I am almost satisfied.
The gap dimension between the left door and the fender is not 100% optimal, because the upper area of the fender does not follow the contour of the door.
What is important: if you discover white traces between the A-pillar and the fender, then the paint is off here. At some point, the zinc treatment of the A-pillar is down and perhaps contact corrosion can occur in combination with the aluminium fender.
 

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Discussion Starter · #106 ·
The fit and finish on my 2019 QV in Rossa Alfa is perfect, although I saw several at different dealers in different colors that did have more variation in the body gaps, and in the feel of the seat side bolsters, for some reason (same type seats).
In the meantime, I have the feeling that something is wrong with the plant and earlier models have a better assembling quality. Just imagine: the plant has a production capacity utilization of 20% (40.000 vehicles/year), only. Is it still staffed fully?
 

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The carbon hoods of the QV do not have the finish of the aluminium hoods. This is already known. You can be sure that I close the hood, correctly - it's better at a high speed, had 280kph on the highway, yesterday.
Wow, that's about 174 mph. I imagine that is more safely attainable in Europe than on the US highways.
 

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Wow, that's about 174 mph. I imagine that is more safely attainable in Europe than on the US highways.
Many highways in Germany have no speed limit, and are also built to allow cars to go fast, so it's quite ok to go fast, if traffic allows.
 

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In the meantime, I have the feeling that something is wrong with the plant and earlier models have a better assembling quality. Just imagine: the plant has a production capacity utilization of 20% (40.000 vehicles/year), only. Is it still staffed fully?
No, they are down to about a 1/3 of potential utilisation. And most of the assembly is highly robotized. Even a quality freak like Imparato admitted that what comes out of the Cassino plant is of very high quality.
 

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Many highways in Germany have no speed limit, and are also built to allow cars to go fast, so it's quite ok to go fast, if traffic allows.
I've driven the autobahn..cars appear out of nowhere fast. Keep your head up!

 

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I think you need to explain that a bit...
Note: I didn't realize the plant name is not the city name, so both references are to the same plant.

I have found claims of two different sites for the production--this is from a dealership in South Carolina and seems to be newer information:
Available with Ferrari engines in their Quadrifoglio configurations, and producing more than 500 horsepower, both the Giulia and Stelvio are class leaders when it comes to available power, and are packed with luxury features. Looking at their curves and interior design cues, there's no doubt that the Alfa Romeo Giulia and Stelvio are the result of meticulous Italian craftsmanship. If you've seen an Alfa Romeo drive by in South Carolina, you already know they're like nothing else on the road. Both are built in San Germano, Italy.

Although the URL says Stellantis North America, this seems to be older information from four years ago, in September 2017.
The newest additions to the Alfa Romeo lineup are not just any vehicles, and they are not built in just any plant.
The powerful Giulia sedan and the high-performance Stelvio SUV are currently being built in Alfa Romeo’s state-of-the-art Cassino Assembly Plant, located in central Italy.
 

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Note: I didn't realize the plant name is not the city name, so both references are to the same plant.

I have found claims of two different sites for the production--this is from a dealership in South Carolina and seems to be newer information:
Available with Ferrari engines in their Quadrifoglio configurations, and producing more than 500 horsepower, both the Giulia and Stelvio are class leaders when it comes to available power, and are packed with luxury features. Looking at their curves and interior design cues, there's no doubt that the Alfa Romeo Giulia and Stelvio are the result of meticulous Italian craftsmanship. If you've seen an Alfa Romeo drive by in South Carolina, you already know they're like nothing else on the road. Both are built in San Germano, Italy.

Although the URL says Stellantis North America, this seems to be older information from four years ago, in September 2017.
The newest additions to the Alfa Romeo lineup are not just any vehicles, and they are not built in just any plant.
The powerful Giulia sedan and the high-performance Stelvio SUV are currently being built in Alfa Romeo’s state-of-the-art Cassino Assembly Plant, located in central Italy.
Considering that dealer states the QV has Ferrari engines, I'd take the rest with a grain of salt.
 

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The Cassino plant was developed and constructed as a part of the Giorgio programme, and to become the center for any car based on the Giorgio platform. Alfa normally choose the city name to name the manufacturing plant, so that's why we have had Arese (a suburb to Milan) and Pomigliano d'Arco, a suburb (more or less) to Naples in the south - originally constructed to produce the Alfa Sud.

The reason for the rumour that the Quad-version is built elsewhere probably stems from the fact that the engine was indeed developed by Ferrari but also built by Ferrari. Several eyewitnesses with a good knowledge of Alfa have stated this as a "add-on" from taking the guided tour in the Ferrari engine workshop. The fact that the engine is built by Ferrari is a sensitive thing, so even on FCA:s webpage it's stated that the engine is built/assembled in Termoli, which is where the four pot engine is built, as this is the home of FCA PowerTrain, previously responsible for all FCA engines for Fiat, Lancia and Alfa Romeo.

So, to sum it up:
Cassino - Giulia, Stelvio
Pomigliano d'Arco - No Alfas yet, but Tonale is coming

Four cylinder engine - Termoli
Six cylinder engine - Top secret engine manufacturer :cool:
 

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Considering that dealer states the QV has Ferrari engines, I'd take the rest with a grain of salt.
It turns out it the dealers information on where it is built is correct, although maybe a bit outdated. According to Wikipedia Cassino had been renamed San Germano for the period between 949 and 1863.

Perhaps they should have said the engine was based on a Ferrari V-8, minus two cylinders.
 

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The Cassino plant was developed and constructed as a part of the Giorgio programme, and to become the center for any car based on the Giorgio platform. Alfa normally choose the city name to name the manufacturing plant, so that's why we have had Arese (a suburb to Milan) and Pomigliano d'Arco, a suburb (more or less) to Naples in the south - originally constructed to produce the Alfa Sud.

The reason for the rumour that the Quad-version is built elsewhere probably stems from the fact that the engine was indeed developed by Ferrari but also built by Ferrari. Several eyewitnesses with a good knowledge of Alfa have stated this as a "add-on" from taking the guided tour in the Ferrari engine workshop. The fact that the engine is built by Ferrari is a sensitive thing, so even on FCA:s webpage it's stated that the engine is built/assembled in Termoli, which is where the four pot engine is built, as this is the home of FCA PowerTrain, previously responsible for all FCA engines for Fiat, Lancia and Alfa Romeo.

So, to sum it up:
Cassino - Giulia, Stelvio
Pomigliano d'Arco - No Alfas yet, but Tonale is coming

Four cylinder engine - Termoli
Six cylinder engine - Top secret engine manufacturer :cool:
So that dealership is spilling the secret beans (or is that redundant?) about the true genesis of Quadrifoglio engine?
 
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