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Alfa Romeo has been trying to shed its lingering stereotype of unreliable vehicles and the days of rusting bodies, dubious electrics and unreliable engines are a thing of the past. At least that’s what we though until an Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio broke down while competing against a BMW M3 and a Mercedes-AMG C63 S.

PistonHeads brought all three to Anglesey Circuit in North Wales in a test to see which vehicle performs the best on track. On paper, both the Giulia QV and Mercedes-AMG seems to be evenly matched with the BMW M3 coming in third in terms of both power and torque. Costing a bit less than Mercedes’ offering, the Giulia’s twin-turbo V6 has a faster 0-62 mph sprint time at 3.9 seconds and its top speed caps off at an impressive 190 mph compared to its rival’s 155mph.

Perhaps the final results would have been different if the Giulia hadn’t broken down. A frustrating situation for Dan Trent as he truly believes the sport sedan is a real wild thrilling car to drive with pointy steering and ceramic brakes that bites down hard.

But it wasn’t meant to be because shortly after the check engine light flashed on, the Giulia locked into Normal drive mode before shifting to limp mode and finally coming to a stop. In the end, the BMW M3 came out on top thanks to its Competition package.

 

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That sucks.
 

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Sabotage.....
 

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They still liked the Quad

If you read the article...they prefer the Alfa anyway....just sayin...
 
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Exactly !!!!
 

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When I picked up my TI Q4 in April I was advised by the dealer to only use the "n" and "a" modes for the first 1000 to 1500 miles, it could be something in the computer that's causing the problem, the only problem I had was with the sunroof not opening, but that was a 5 minute fix at the dealership, the dealership also advise me to take it easy on the brakes for the first 500 miles. But then again do you think I listened to them.
 

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When I picked up my TI Q4 in April I was advised by the dealer to only use the "n" and "a" modes for the first 1000 to 1500 miles, it could be something in the computer that's causing the problem, the only problem I had was with the sunroof not opening, but that was a 5 minute fix at the dealership, the dealership also advise me to take it easy on the brakes for the first 500 miles. But then again do you think I listened to them.
The dealership advice, IMHO, is sound.
I would have worded it slightly differently. I would have advised you to drive 100-200 miles trying to minimize engine idling, and to not hold the gas pedal to the floor and make the engine run to redline and then shift.
Same for the brakes. 100-200 miles before you carve that favorite canyon and perform max braking over and over.
We used to call this the break-in period.
Some might say that it is not necessary.
I say, if you want to do right by your car, so that it has it's best chance to last for a really long time, with a minimal amount of problems, use this break-in procedure, and change your engine oil before the 1000 mile mark.
Hey, other than a bit of delayed gratification and the cost of a few quarts oil, it can't hurt. And, it will improve you chances of having a great and long lasting ownership experience.
 
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When I picked up my TI Q4 in April I was advised by the dealer to only use the "n" and "a" modes for the first 1000 to 1500 miles, it could be something in the computer that's causing the problem, the only problem I had was with the sunroof not opening, but that was a 5 minute fix at the dealership, the dealership also advise me to take it easy on the brakes for the first 500 miles. But then again do you think I listened to them.
My dealer flipped my Ti into Dynamic for my test drive (the car had 36 miles on it) and told me I was not driving it hard enough while I was testing it. Clearly dealers are not all being told the same thing. I have had no issues with the car which now has 1800 miles on it.
 
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Mine too, was told break in wasn't necessary. There's the school of thought that says driving like you stole it in 'break in' does good.. who knows... we'll all see in ten years lol

Are you related to Sherlock Holmes?.....:grin2:
No I just noticed it as I had my nose pressed on the screen while drooling...amazing what you can pick up!
 

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I had a problem with the sunroof not opening that took the dealer 2 weeks and a consultation from FCA Detroit to figure out. I hope the experience was helpful to other dealers.
 

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I believe the Giulia did the same thing during a Car and Driver test as well.

As a newbie here and reading through a lot of the threads, the car dying on the road seems to be an issue. There is a survey on this forum that shows a number of forum members experiencing varying levels of engine issues, some being fixed by updates and some resulting in the cars being bought back. I appreciate the candor of the members here and the foresight of the site's administrators not censoring the negative. My conclusion is to wait a year to see what happens before I consider purchasing a Giulia.

I am a 2016 4c owner
Probably a smart idea. If you've waited this long and you already have a 4C, then you might as well wait and see how things work out over the next 6-12 months. Some of us diehards are willing to take a chance in order to get a Giulia ASAP. As long as it doesn't have horrible issues, most of us are willing to put up with the teething pains knowing that it is to be expected with any new model (of any make). Most people obviously expect to get a perfectly functioning car for 45, 50, or 80K. Its all a matter of risk vs benefit and your personal comfort level.
BMW, et al had better be praying that Alfa doesn't get ALL of these issues sorted - at this moment that's all that they have to hang their hat on!!
 

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Mine too, was told break in wasn't necessary. There's the school of thought that says driving like you stole it in 'break in' does good.. who knows... we'll all see in ten years lol



No I just noticed it as I had my nose pressed on the screen while drooling...amazing what you can pick up!
The old school break in was not all gentle. The reasoning is that your need to stress things enough that the surfaces don't "glaze" but avoid stressing it so much that something overheats.

I don't know of a "safe" way to break in tires. I would think that slamming on the brakes until the ABS cuts in a few times should do it.
 

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Zoom up and down the the highway for 1000 miles then do a track day... makes them nicely broken in lol
I have experienced (the need for) tire "break-in" first hand.
It was years ago and I don't remember exactly what brand of tires that I was using.
I had driven my pumped-up 74 GTV to a road course and had a fresh set of never used "R-Spec" tires on a different set of wheels. Swapped wheels and went out for my first stint. I had little to no grip for the entire stint. I couldn't understand what was going on. I came in and chatted with other drivers and was told that the next stint will be completely different (better), and it was. It was explained to me that the the break-in for (these) tires is the heat cycling. They needed to to be brought up to (a certain) temperature and then allowed to cool. After that, they gripped sooo much better.
Michelin tires used to mold-in to the tread surface a very thin raised image of Bibendum (the Michelin Man) onto the surface of the tread, on their street tires. The owner's pamphlet that was provided with the new tires stated that it was best to wait until the Bibendum image was worn away before attempting to extract full gripping power from the tires.
There is also a suggested break-in procedure for new brake pads and rotors.
After replacement, drive the car very gently and use the brakes very gently for just a mile or two allowing the brakes to only get warm, not too hot. Then park and allow the brakes to cool. Repeat, and this time drive normally, but not extremely aggressively. Park and allow to cool. Now, you are ready for 10 10ths. What you have done is heat cycled the rotors so that they will last longer and resist warpage. Also, you have heat cycled the brake pads and allowed them to off-gas the solvents that are used in manufacture.
These procedures have benefits that are more obvious (in the long haul) to those that (at times) drive their cars at 10 10ths, than for those that only drive at lesser fractions.
Happy Motoring!!
 
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Aye I noticed Chin for example explicitly call out not to bring new tires, guess it's tempting to order a new set for your day out :)
 
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