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Would you do yours at 30k or 60k miles?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For anyone who had been wondering if we needed to do the recommended Q2/Q4 spark plug change at 30k or 60k, I've made a how-to video (linked below) on changing the spark plugs. There are at least a couple threads on this and I wanted to provide my experience in one place.


Check out the video, but I'll sum up my thoughts here:

a) I don't think it's unreasonable to wait until 60k miles to do this for most of us. For reference, see around the 5:26 mark in my video to see what a 32k miles plug might look like on a tuned 2.0T
b) I think it's also reasonable to want to do this early if you really drive your car hard at the track, autocross, or hooning on the street 馃榿.
c) Doing this yourself makes too much sense. Doesn't require many tools, expertise or much time (~30 mins, longer if you stop to drink your beer) compared to even a DIY oil change on the Giulia. Also, save money and buy the plugs from sources other than the dealer:


Hope this helps!
 
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good video, one correction., The service info shows 168 inch lbs or 14 Ft lbs for the plugs.... very few consumer grade torque wrenches are accurate down that low.....I was pretty nervous watching you tighten them up .... just use common sense and snug them up with a 3/8 ratchet set up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
good video, one correction., The service info shows 168 inch lbs or 14 Ft lbs for the plugs.... very few consumer grade torque wrenches are accurate down that low.....I was pretty nervous watching you tighten them up .... just use common sense and snug them up with a 3/8 ratchet set up.
Thanks for that correction, I think I'll put that in my video description to not misleas anyone else. I normally do what you do, but I was being extra. You may have notice how timid I was about turning it 馃槃
 

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2017 Giulia Ti Sport Q4
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The electrical connections are a lot easier to remove than you are making them. You just pull the plastic tab out, then push down on it to release. You do not need picks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The electrical connections are a lot easier to remove than you are making them. You just pull the plastic tab out, then push down on it to release. You do not need picks.
Thanks, I'm glad that worked for you. Some months ago,I had seen someone else on this forum ask how its done since they had trouble and this is actually what an Alfa mechanic showed me when I was at a dealer some time ago.
 

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2018 Stelvio Sport Q4 Nor-Cal PRK
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Nice Video Production - clear as a bell and no annoying background music like so many YouTube video guides!

One suggestion - always have a gapper handy.

1st - to double check that the factory pre-gapped specs are correct.

2nd - in case you drop a plug - it will sure as sh*t land on the electrode and close the gap.

3rd - not necessary BUT I like to measure the gap of the old plug and record it into my service records. Tracking them over the years might help diagnose a problem later down the line.

My favorite is the Lang Tools 4450A -
Has Inches on one side, and Millimeters on the other.
About $8 on Amazon

Keep 'em coming and thanks for the contribution!

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I did them at 45k!
They didn鈥檛 look to bad. Got mine from alfissimo!
I鈥檓 at 63k I鈥檒l be changing them again at 70-75k
 

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If I ever drop a spark plug, or even tap the electrode much at all, I toss that plug. A cracked insulator can cause serious damage to an engine. I had a GT3, and a race shop failed to reinstall both fuel pump fuses, and the engine momentarily ran lean at WOT a thousand miles home, and melted the electrode. The damage was over $7K, and the shop refused to accept responsibility.

Any injury to a spark plug can be catastrophic to an engine. Interestingly, yesterday my chain saw would not start, so pulled the plug, and found the insulator loose, and would slide a few mm down and touch the center electrode and shield the spark from the air fuel mixture. Never seen that before. If I had not closely examined the plug I never would have noted the sliding insulator. New plug, fired right up.

If a spark plug is replaced, it is absolutely necessary to use the correct heat range of the plug.

Lots or adventures with plugs. I always properly torque them, and keep new plugs on soft cotton pads when I am making ready to install them, after checking the gaps.

All the best, NV
 

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2019 Giulia Ti Q2, Performance Pack
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If I ever drop a spark plug, or even tap the electrode much at all, I toss that plug. A cracked insulator can cause serious damage to an engine. I had a GT3, and a race shop failed to reinstall both fuel pump fuses, and the engine momentarily ran lean at WOT a thousand miles home, and melted the electrode. The damage was over $7K, and the shop refused to accept responsibility.

Any injury to a spark plug can be catastrophic to an engine. Interestingly, yesterday my chain saw would not start, so pulled the plug, and found the insulator loose, and would slide a few mm down and touch the center electrode and shield the spark from the air fuel mixture. Never seen that before. If I had not closely examined the plug I never would have noted the sliding insulator. New plug, fired right up.

If a spark plug is replaced, it is absolutely necessary to use the correct heat range of the plug.

Lots or adventures with plugs. I always properly torque them, and keep new plugs on soft cotton pads when I am making ready to install them, after checking the gaps.

All the best, NV
The saying is....if you drop it once...drop it twice (the second time being in the trash).
 
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