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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if any sport shocks are already available for the 2.0T (RWD)? Something like Bilstein B6/B8, Koni Yellow or FSD, anything at all? Haven't been able to find them yet.
 

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‘19 Giulia Ti Sport Q4
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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^^ have you looked into compatibility of swaybars between QV and 2.0T? On S4 we used to mount RS4 swaybars, some even put them on A4s...perfect fit and flat ride in corners....I am pretty sure QVs must be quite a bit chunkier
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What you could do is put in a set of adjustable coilovers. Then set the ride height to factory and adjust the rest to suit.



https://madnessautoworks.com/2018-A...fa-romeo-giulia-coilover-kit-by-kw-v3-pid7786
Pretty sure the highest setting on those is still quite a bit lower than stock and also spring rate will be matched to a lower setting, ie. on the firm side, ideally i would retain stock springs but get firmer dampers and possibly firmer anti-roll bars as suggested by lowflyer.

^^ have you looked into compatibility of swaybars between QV and 2.0T? On S4 we used to mount RS4 swaybars, some even put them on A4s...perfect fit and flat ride in corners....I am pretty sure QVs must be quite a bit chunkier
Will look into that although i think stiffer anti-roll bars also warrant firmer shocks as otherwise the car might become a bit bouncy in for example S-curves?
 

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2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
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On the rears, the OEM Giulia spring is separate from the shock and thus applies the loading in a different place on both the suspension and chassis than a coil over. Is such a conversion likely to cause problems with strength and/or handling?

It is not obvious to me that body roll is a bad thing if the suspension geometry was designed for it in the first place. It seems better to me to have compliant suspension so that the tires can keep good ground contact on uneven surfaces. Please explain what might be wrong with this reasoning.
 

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It is not obvious to me that body roll is a bad thing if the suspension geometry was designed for it in the first place. It seems better to me to have compliant suspension so that the tires can keep good ground contact on uneven surfaces. Please explain what might be wrong with this reasoning.
I don't think it's an issue traction wise, but less body roll will make the car more stable in quick transitions, so the car needs less time to recover after a curve by transferring less weight left and right every time. This is more desirable on a track than regular street use.
Those with the perf package already have the best of both worlds imho...
 
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