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Discussion Starter · #1 ·



We've spent the last few months dismantling, learning, and testing the all new Alfa Romeo Giulia 2.0L Turbo engine. The new Multiair2 turbo engine uses a wide array of new features, components, and boost system control unique to new Alfa models that has not been previously utilized on FCA family vehicles.

Data acquisition is key, and very important to understanding the how and why of engine operation. It not only helps us to design and develop better performance products, but also helps the end user understand their vehicle more thoroughly.

We'll detail our developments and add more information as we progress.



ENGINE:

Much of our time has gone into understanding the new Multiair2 engine operation and how it utilizes a few new unique components: direct injection, electronic wastegate, diverter valve movement, variation in valve profiles, intercooler routing, and the mass air flow sensor's part in turbo operation with effects on intake pressure and temperature.

We've started with the factory intake system and turbo operation.



The factory intake system is a great system by design. It is in part a true ram air system (which is our favorite kind). The filter housing receives cool enclosed, high pressure air from the front of the vehicle grill. The ducting shape offers enough inertial separation to prevent large amounts of water and debris from collecting in the filter housing. The MAF bung also has a honey comb insert after the filter housing to increase laminar flow of air as it goes to the turbocharger.

However, initial flow testing showed that by improving component materials we could decrease pressure loss and feed greater air mass over the stock system. Another downside was intake air temperature. Both the Giulia and the Giulia QV have noticeably high intake temperatures over ambient conditions. This could also be improved.

One other important factor for intake design is understanding how the factory evaporative emissions system works and why it is important to maintain this system as the factory intended. Not doing so can result in CELs, decreased longevity to emissions components such as the evap canister, and oil buildup in the intake (which ends up in many unwanted places). All of our intake designs for the Giulia maintain the factory emissions system, and use quick connect adapters for all factory fittings. This negates any reason to cut, remove, or replace any factory lines when replacing the intake system with an EC unit. This was paramount to us.

We have started development on 3 different series intakes: the V1, the V2, and the V4.

Each of these intake designs is manufactured with our EC Kevtek technology. Many silicone parts are lined with fiberglass, or better nomex aramids. We utilize a unique, multi-layered kevlar aramid lining, which offers the highest tensile strength and is very lightweight. It is roughly 5-10 times stronger than standard silicone offerings.

Our filters are manufactured specifically for EC. They do not contain cotton gauze, but are designed with an advanced dry filter media, made with a stronger structured mesh material. This filters debris down to 5 microns in size, and will out flow most market filters up to 10-12%. This filter material is utilized on multiple 24hr Le Mans winning vehicles and on many other motorsport platforms.

Our V1 is a stock replacement unit, which utilizes the factory filter housing. It is meant to offer a stock like appearance while improving intake flow and temperatures.

Our V2 intake system uses an much larger open air element filter and removes the stock airbox. The open air filter allows for much louder intake noises, and offers much higher flow and volume. It utilizes the factory fresh air duct and still ingests air from the front of the car while also using underhood pressure.

Our V4 intake system is a completely closed ram air unit, sealed directly to the front of the car and uses a high flow cone filter enclosed in a carbon fiber airbox.

Only sneak peeks for now:










We will have charts to view of temp, flow, and power data once we get closer to release.

This is an upgrade to the stock diverter valve housing. The DV+ from Go Fast Bits offers sharper and more consistent valve actuation during various boost scenarios, which is especially important as we change or increase boost/airflow. The stock actuator is sound in design and works fine in most cases up to a point, but it can develop weak points in the valve mechanism as more is demanded from it.




ECU:

This we are especially excited about. The Giulia 2.0 Multiair2 turbo uses a brand new engine management unit from Magneti Marelli, the MM10JA. Typically with new ECU units there is a delay with support for bench flashing and OBDII, but we have been able to jump straight in.



Because of certain constraints within this ECU's boost control system, and with torque management, we decided to move forward with direct ECU tuning over an external piggyback module offering. Due to these electronic components and mapping within the ECU, a piggyback module in the case of the Giulia is going to be capped and limited at very low performance levels in order to avoid certain issues with the boost control system (random CELs in various modes at cruise and WOT rpms). This is based on our testing.

We have progressed to developing our Phase 1 calibration for the Giulia. This at first involved a direct clone, where the original ECU is opened and used to make a second factory ECU that is compatible with the same vehicle, but in tuned format. The Giulia ECU is easily opened and closed with no evidence or footprint.

Further into development, we are now flash tuning the Giulia via the OBDII port.



At the moment, I don't believe any one else is doing this. The ECU is read via a handheld, and a tuned version of this factory calibration is written to the ECU using the handheld via the OBDII port.

Our tune and final numbers are still in development (this is currently an active project), but we will have more info on different tuning options for the end user as we near completion. So far we are making great strides into getting safe but very aggressive power out of this engine.



APPEARANCE & SUSPENSION

Our Giulia 2.0 has had a few upgrades in this category. We don't typically deal in aesthetic modifications and usually stick to performance components, but we've decided to dabble a bit. One look at the Giulia and it's hard not to keep dressing it up!

We are currently setting up a few wheel design offerings from our partner, Avant Garde. Wheels manufactured by AG are very high quality, lightweight, and with very striking designs and custom finishes. Wheels for the Giulia are made to order and with custom sizing sourced by EC.

M652 with Brushed Polish Champagne:




Lugnut conversion:



The car has also been lowered with our Eibach Pro-Kit Lowering Springs, and some subtle dark wrap on the lighter colored trim pieces with tail/headlight darkening:




All of these and more will be available on our website at shopeurocompulsion.net

We hope to be adding an exhaust from our friends at Centerline shortly, which we will also be offering, especially as we increase performance from tuning and our intake systems.

We will be keeping this thread updated as projects move forward, and will have official threads available as products are released. Stay tuned!
 

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This is all very exciting. With your ECU tuning, are you planning to address the traction control and esc calibrations?
 

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Great job Eurocompulsion! Superb and highly detailed write-up. I am in the UK and have the 200HP which shares the same hardware as the 280HP but I believe the only difference on the 200HP is a just the ECU map, this has the same turbo, intercooler, intake, engine, turbo etc. it also has an EGR, intake lambda. The difference is the EGR function, intake lambda and intercooler function are not used by the ECU on the 200HP.
Not sure if you fellas are aware of this as the USA is mainly 280HP I guess?

There hasn't yet been this level of research in the UK or Europe that I have come across and so I am watching this thread and all your guy's posts very closely. Thank indeed! Great job!
 

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The car looks stunning by the way with the wheels and lowered. What paint protection does it have... looks super glossy??
 
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The car looks stunning by the way with the wheels and lowered. What paint protection does it have... looks super glossy??
Thank you!

Just a wash and a quick wax. Getting some ceramic coating done soon. Just waiting to find the right guy to do it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the update and all the careful testing you are doing on the 2.0 product development. With a car this complex there is clearly a lot that can go wrong.
Exactly, they seem to get more complex with each model year.

The R&D is something very important to us. We are always pressed to get products out quickly, but the newer Alfa platform is very close to us not only professionally but also personally. So it's paramount that we are very thorough with development.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is all very exciting. With your ECU tuning, are you planning to address the traction control and esc calibrations?
Most systems like ABS, traction control, ESC etc are BCM functions, and typically cannot be altered. To be honest these are safety systems we may not want to change in anyway.

However, with both the 2.0L and the 2.9L, there are certain conditions where the vehicle appears to limit performance delivery via those systems, but it is actually limiters and arrangements within the DNA modes. Each mode is very multifaceted. We've seen that altering the respective modes to our liking greatly changes the driving dynamics of the car, and can eliminate many of the instances where it feels like the car is holding back due to nanny systems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Great job Eurocompulsion! Superb and highly detailed write-up. I am in the UK and have the 200HP which shares the same hardware as the 280HP but I believe the only difference on the 200HP is a just the ECU map, this has the same turbo, intercooler, intake, engine, turbo etc. it also has an EGR, intake lambda. The difference is the EGR function, intake lambda and intercooler function are not used by the ECU on the 200HP.
Not sure if you fellas are aware of this as the USA is mainly 280HP I guess?

There hasn't yet been this level of research in the UK or Europe that I have come across and so I am watching this thread and all your guy's posts very closely. Thank indeed! Great job!
Thanks! So far, it appears that the main difference between the 200hp vs. the 280hp model is software mapping. Though we don't have a 200hp version car here in the states, I do have the factory mapping and ECU file info from that model, and that is the conclusion at this time.

For example, if you tune a US 280hp model to 300hp, those same tuning changes can be interpolated to the 200hp model to offer similar results (all dependent on fuel quality and emissions).

What would be really cool is a simple "update" to the 200hp factory software. With one flash you should be able to go from a 200hp model software to a 280hp model software without changing anything else >:)
 

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Thanks! So far, it appears that the main difference between the 200hp vs. the 280hp model is software mapping. Though we don't have a 200hp version car here in the states, I do have the factory mapping and ECU file info from that model, and that is the conclusion at this time.

For example, if you tune a US 280hp model to 300hp, those same tuning changes can be interpolated to the 200hp model to offer similar results (all dependent on fuel quality and emissions).

What would be really cool is a simple "update" to the 200hp factory software. With one flash you should be able to go from a 200hp model software to a 280hp model software without changing anything else >:)
Great. That ties in with my understanding. I guessing that means with the ECU "update" the currently inactive EGR/Intake Lamda/Intercooler function etc. will be "activated" because they will be "enabled" within the software?

Also, do the US models come with EGR - Exhaust Gas re-circulation and if so any plans to blank this off and disable in the ECU map? This is an emissions thing over here because of the European Union regulations. Previously only diesels had them, but now more and more petrol engines seem to have them. Not a big fan of re-circulating dirty exhaust gases into the intake side for obvious reasons! Cheers.
 

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Most systems like ABS, traction control, ESC etc are BCM functions, and typically cannot be altered. To be honest these are safety systems we may not want to change in anyway.

However, with both the 2.0L and the 2.9L, there are certain conditions where the vehicle appears to limit performance delivery via those systems, but it is actually limiters and arrangements within the DNA modes. Each mode is very multifaceted. We've seen that altering the respective modes to our liking greatly changes the driving dynamics of the car, and can eliminate many of the instances where it feels like the car is holding back due to nanny systems.
That is very interesting, and the information very much appreciated. Are said DNA remaps something you are hoping to offer once development continues?
 

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Exciting stuff!

I'm waiting on your ECU for my Ti Q2. I'm hoping that intake, exhaust and ECU will bump me up to 350 hp.
 

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Exciting stuff!

I'm waiting on your ECU for my Ti Q2. I'm hoping that intake, exhaust and ECU will bump me up to 350 hp.
Racer Z and Eurocompulsion,

I think you like me need to worry about how to pass California smog if/when installing anything like this. Is this likely to happen? I know cat-back exhaust is usually OK and air filter boxes are usually OK, but once the air manifold and EGR/PCV get involved the equipment may need to be smog approved to pass. It is not clear to me if a cloned, retuned ECU will pass inspection either.

Just to complicate things, I will be registering my Giulia in Mono County (population 14,000, about 1/200ths the population density of LA county), which has reduced smog equipment inspection rules compared to more populated areas. However, I don't know how relaxed at this time.
 

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Racer Z and Eurocompulsion,

I think you like me need to worry about how to pass California smog if/when installing anything like this. Is this likely to happen? I know cat-back exhaust is usually OK and air filter boxes are usually OK, but once the air manifold and EGR/PCV get involved the equipment may need to be smog approved to pass. It is not clear to me if a cloned, retuned ECU will pass inspection either.

Just to complicate things, I will be registering my Giulia in Mono County (population 14,000, about 1/200ths the population density of LA county), which has reduced smog equipment inspection rules compared to more populated areas. However, I don't know how relaxed at this time.
I live in LA County, so I'm in the same position as you lockem. On the car's fifth year, it will need to get sniffed and every two years thereafter.

I have EC's cloned ECU on my 4C. I plan on getting EC's cloned ECU for the Giulia. This means I can swap out the ECU at any time for a variety of reasons.
  • Dealer service. If they need to flash the car, the flash might overwrite the ECU code making the performance unit just another OEM unit.
  • Smog check. If it fails smog, I can swap out ECU and retest.
  • ECU failure. Well, it could happen.
  • I'll think of another reason later...

On the 4C, it takes five minutes to swap out the ECU. I haven't looked for the Giulia ECU yet, but how hard can it be?
 
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Toby,

if you can get at the brains of the car on this level, do you think you could make other changes? For example, I understand that in Europe, pulling on both the paddle shifters puts the car in neutral. Could you activate that? I think I'd love to make her feel more like a manual tranny car and that would.

Also, I am quite convinced that the A mode in the US doesn't allow "coasting" as much as I have heard it does in Europe - it is a fairly useless mode - just more sluggish in its response. Could you make it more efficient?
 

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I'll try to address the last few posts at one time here.

Racer: we do think 350hp is realistic with a tuned ECU, intake and exhaust. Since our dyno isn't installed yet, I don't have concrete numbers on anything, but the data we do have suggests that the stock Giulia is a bit under rated and has around 300hp, and that Jordan's car has been up around 350 with just our V2 intake and an agressive EDL tune.

Emissions is a complex subject. The short answer is that most of the mods don't effect an emissions test and will pass. Let's go through them all one by one.

Exaust: This one is easy. Exhaust mods after the cat are legal. I understand that Centerline is working with Magnaflow on a cat back exhaust. Not only will this be legal, I am 100% certain it will add power, and it's what we plan to use on our own 2.0 Giulia.

The intakes are all designed with the correct emissions fittings and will not have any negative impact on tail pipe emissions. However, in locations that have an under hood visual inspection and a requirement that parts be stock or approved by the state (which sadly means the manufacturer paid them a large "testing" fee) a modified intake will be an automatic fail. However, in the case of our V1 intake, it would probably pass since it's essentially a direct replacement part and retains the factory air box. All the intakes are easy to install and remove, so the other intakes could be taken on and off as needed, like for track days. I'll talk more about this when the intakes are actually out. I think Toby put up some sneak peaks. The intakes are really nice, they are the best we have ever made.

I want to add that the intakes won't harm actual emissions, if anything they are cleaner than the factory airbox. The only issue is with the visual component of the test.

The ECU tune is an easy one. It will easily pass any emissions test that a stock car will pass, it's undetectable during an emissions test.

Greg
 
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