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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had been intermittently having issues with the Stop/Start feature not working (not that I like the feature), so I asked the dealer to look at it while having the T57 recall done. Dealer said that everything checked out okay, but I was still concerned that the battery was not being sufficiently charged for the Stop/Start feature to be enabled.

I didn't drive the car the day after the service was performed, and when I went to drive it the following day, I had no lights or anything. (I measured about 3v across the terminals in the engine compartment). I called the dealer, and the service director came to my house, brought me a Stelvio loaner, and jumped my Giulia to take to the service department. They reported that the battery checked out okay but that it was not charging properly.

Although the computer was not reporting any error or trouble codes, they diagnosed the problem to a faulty IBS ("Intelligent Battery Sensor"). They replaced that sensor, and it appears that the issue has been resolved. Will report back if the problem repeats itself.

Shout out to the dealer (Alfa Romeo of Dallas), which has been great even though it has only been open about two weeks now.
 

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I thought the only function of the IBS was to monitor battery voltage in order to shut down high current draw systems when the battery is low. Based on the post above, it looks like it also controls battery charging rate. Conventional charging systems have been very reliable for many years. Anyone know why ALFA uses the IBS to control charge rate rather than using conventional constant voltage charging?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I thought the only function of the IBS was to monitor battery voltage in order to shut down high current draw systems when the battery is low. Based on the post above, it looks like it also controls battery charging rate. Conventional charging systems have been very reliable for many years. Anyone know why ALFA uses the IBS to control charge rate rather than using conventional constant voltage charging?
Battery charging on the BMWs I've owned over the past several years has also been overly complicated, with BMW requiring battery "registration" to be programmed into the charging system. As far as I can tell, this system was designed to make people purchase BMW batteries at the dealership and not replace their own with aftermarket batteries.

On the Giulia, according to the service director, the IBS provides a "battery charge status" signal to the charging system, which varies the amount of charge based on the charge status of the battery. My sensor intermittently was incorrectly reporting full charge. As I said, I will watch to see if the problem repeats.
 

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Hmm, I noticed yesterday that my QV was slow to wake up after 2 days off while I had a medical procedure. Started great today after a spin and groceries yesterday but I wonder about a charger... Miata likes it because of the boost harness issues and arctic remote (and summer boring old) parking assignment outside the garage ;)
 

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Battery charging on the BMWs I've owned over the past several years has also been overly complicated, with BMW requiring battery "registration" to be programmed into the charging system. As far as I can tell, this system was designed to make people purchase BMW batteries at the dealership and not replace their own with aftermarket batteries.

On the Giulia, according to the service director, the IBS provides a "battery charge status" signal to the charging system, which varies the amount of charge based on the charge status of the battery. My sensor intermittently was incorrectly reporting full charge. As I said, I will watch to see if the problem repeats.
I did some research and it supports what you found. By controlling charging voltage they claim to reduce fuel consumption and increase battery life. It's a complex system with another module that interprets the IBS signal and controls alternator output.

In the good old days when the charging system failed you replaced the alternator. Now if could be one of several things. This is progress?

The most troubling thing is that the charging system failed allowing the battery to run down with no warning light or message. Looks like a serious system design fault to me. I'm thinking a dash mounted volt meter might be a good investment.
 
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I had been intermittently having issues with the Stop/Start feature not working (not that I like the feature), so I asked the dealer to look at it while having the T57 recall done. Dealer said that everything checked out okay, but I was still concerned that the battery was not being sufficiently charged for the Stop/Start feature to be enabled.

I didn't drive the car the day after the service was performed, and when I went to drive it the following day, I had no lights or anything. (I measured about 3v across the terminals in the engine compartment). I called the dealer, and the service director came to my house, brought me a Stelvio loaner, and jumped my Giulia to take to the service department. They reported that the battery checked out okay but that it was not charging properly.

Although the computer was not reporting any error or trouble codes, they diagnosed the problem to a faulty IBS ("Intelligent Battery Sensor"). They replaced that sensor, and it appears that the issue has been resolved. Will report back if the problem repeats itself.

Shout out to the dealer (Alfa Romeo of Dallas), which has been great even though it has only been open about two weeks now.
Hi sloboy89,

I am glad to hear that you have worked with your dealer to resolve this concern. In the future, if you are in need of additional assistance while your vehicle is in service, please send us a private message.

Darlene
Alfa Romeo Care Specialist
 
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