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Preface
I recently bought a Giulia base model and since I'm not one to leave well enough alone, I started modding.

This is a guide, not a bible. Please use it at your own risk and don't be alarmed if some of it is different for your particular trim / drivetrain layout.
However, most of this should work with all trims. Not sure if the AWD cars have a different front suspension design.


Springs
Here are the springs available for the Giulia:
Eibach ProKit



Part#: E10-10-013-01-22
Front: -1.0" / ???lb
Rear: -0.8" / ???lb
Where to get them:
Demon-tweeks.uk - $200 + shipping
Eurocompulsion - $270 + shipping
CardId - $270 + shipping

KWs
Part#: TBD
Front: TBD
Rear: TBD


Tools
Here are the tools you will need to swap springs out.
- Spring compressor
- 5mm allen
- 6mm allen
- 13mm socket
- 16mm socket
- 16mm wrench
- 17mm socket
- T40 internal torx socket
- E14 external torx socket
- E18 external torx socket
- E20 external torx socket
- Jack *Not required, but helpful
- Prybar *Not required, but helpful
- Screwdriver, large *Not required, but helpful

Process

Front Suspension:
1. Get the car into the air and secure (Jack, jack stands, lift, etc).
2. Remove wheels (17mm socket)
3. Loosen, but do not remove, three nuts on the top of the strut (13mm socket)



4. Loosen the nut on the top of the strut hat, but do not remove. This is easier to do outside of the car. (16mm socket)
5. Remove the sway bar end link. (16mm wrench, T40 internal torx)



6. Remove the bolt that joins the lower control arm to the strut. (E18 external torx, 16mm wrench).



7. Remove the bolt that joins the spindle to the upper A arm. This is a pinch connection for the upper ball joint. (E14 external torx, 16mm wrench)
8. Separate the spindle from the upper A arm, be careful as the spindle will want to swing out.
9. Remove the top strut nuts that you loosened earlier.
10. Push on the spindle and remove the strut from the car.
11. Install spring compressor. (Spring compressor)
12. Pull the dust boot and bump stop down, behind the spring, so you can access the strut rod.
13. Using a strap wrench [preferred] to hold the strut rod from spinning, while you undo the nut on the top hat. Option 2: Wrap a towel around the strut rod at the top most portion nearest to the hat, then clamp on the towel and rod with vice grips. (16mm socket, strap wrench, vice grips, towel)
14. Remove top hat.
15. Remove spring.
16. Install spring, ensuring you have the spring aligned against the rubberized cups.
17. Install is reverse of removal.


Rear Suspension:
1. Get the car into the air and secure (Jack, jack stands, lift, etc).
2. Remove wheels (17mm socket)
3. Remove the sway bar end link. (16mm wrench, T40 internal torx)
4. Remove the bolt that joins the spindle to the control arm (E18 external torx)
5. Remove the bolt that joins the spindle to the shock lower mount (E18 external torx)
6. Separate the spindle from the control arm. You may need to use a prybar. BE CAREFUL, as the brake line is attached to both the spindle and the lower control arm. There is SOME slack, but not much. (prybar)
7. Install the spring compressor on the back half of the spring. You won't be able to get to the front half. (Spring compressor)
8. Push down on both the spindle and control arm, while also prying on the spring lower to remove. This may take some effort. (Prybar).
9. Reinstall the rubberized spring locator perches onto the spring, taking note of the orientation and spring end cups.
10. Install is reverse of removal.

And how it looks after:



 

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Process

Front Suspension:
1. Get the car into the air and secure (Jack, jack stands, lift, etc).
2. Remove wheels (17mm socket)
3. Loosen, but do not remove, three nuts on the top of the strut (13mm socket)


4. Loosen the nut on the top of the strut hat, but do not remove. This is easier to do outside of the car. (16mm socket)
5. Remove the sway bar end link. (16mm wrench, T40 internal torx)


6. Remove the bolt that joins the lower control arm to the strut. (E18 external torx, 16mm wrench).


7. Remove the bolt that joins the spindle to the upper A arm. This is a pinch connection for the upper ball joint. (E14 external torx, 16mm wrench)
8. Separate the spindle from the upper A arm, be careful as the spindle will want to swing out.
9. Remove the top strut nuts that you loosened earlier.
10. Push on the spindle and remove the strut from the car.
11. Install spring compressor. (Spring compressor)
12. Pull the dust boot and bump stop down, behind the spring, so you can access the strut rod.
13. Using a strap wrench [preferred] to hold the strut rod from spinning, while you undo the nut on the top hat. Option 2: Wrap a towel around the strut rod at the top most portion nearest to the hat, then clamp on the towel and rod with vice grips. (16mm socket, strap wrench, vice grips, towel)
14. Remove top hat.
15. Remove spring.
16. Install spring, ensuring you have the spring aligned against the rubberized cups.
17. Install is reverse of removal.


Rear Suspension:
1. Get the car into the air and secure (Jack, jack stands, lift, etc).
2. Remove wheels (17mm socket)
3. Remove the sway bar end link. (16mm wrench, T40 internal torx)
4. Remove the bolt that joins the spindle to the control arm (E18 external torx)
5. Remove the bolt that joins the spindle to the shock lower mount (E18 external torx)
6. Separate the spindle from the control arm. You may need to use a prybar. BE CAREFUL, as the brake line is attached to both the spindle and the lower control arm. There is SOME slack, but not much. (prybar)
7. Install the spring compressor on the back half of the spring. You won't be able to get to the front half. (Spring compressor)
8. Push down on both the spindle and control arm, while also prying on the spring lower to remove. This may take some effort. (Prybar).
9. Reinstall the rubberized spring locator perches onto the spring, taking note of the orientation and spring end cups.
10. Install is reverse of removal.



And how it looks after:

awesome right up! Thanks for taking the time to do this .car looks amazing by the way
 

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2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio
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Thank you for the DYI - car looks great!

I love the look of bubbly tires!!! How does one achieve this? By purchasing wider tires than the rim? softer walls? What is the best tire for this look? This would have an affect in cornering right? Sorry for the million questions :)
 

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Nice! I love a good DIY write-up.

note: Your other post on this got caught in moderation. I approved it so it should be public now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nice! I love a good DIY write-up.

note: Your other post on this got caught in moderation. I approved it so it should be public now.
You can probably delete it so we don't have redundant info.


Nice write-up.
Sorry, but I need to ask, is this your Giulia that you acquired? Or does it belong to a customer?

Do work at or own an auto repair shop? Or are you more like me and just love tinkering at home?
This is my personal Giulia.
I did everything out of my own garage (I don't own a repair shop) -- definitely a hands-on type of car person currently removing the drivetrain out of the fast car for some summer repairs. ;)




Thank you for the DYI - car looks great!

I love the look of bubbly tires!!! How does one achieve this? By purchasing wider tires than the rim? softer walls? What is the best tire for this look? This would have an affect in cornering right? Sorry for the million questions :)
The stock tires were 225/45-18 on 18x8 +35 wheels all around. The QVs have a non-staggered setup, IIRC. AWD cars may be different too.

I ended up getting another set of 18x8 +35 wheels, and put 245/40-18 Federal 595 RS-Rs. The difference between the 225/45 and 245/40 sidewalls is marginal (0.6% I believe), so the speedo is pretty accurate still. Changing out the run-flats and putting on better tires has made the car drive significantly better, without the weird tramlining on freeways the car had before.

I made sure to buy a set of TPMS sensors from Centerline to install in the new wheels. After a few miles of driving, the car picked up the pressures. I'm sure the 433mhz TPMS sensors can be found elsewhere for far cheaper than the $60/ea centerline charges for the Alfa specific ones, but I was too impatient to test that out. If anyone is bored, try a regular mopar 433mhz sensor and see if the car picks up the sensor. Might save people $100-$150, since the basic mopar sensors go for $30/ea.

Slightly off topic but somewhat helpful.
 

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Great write up and one to remember when I come to do mine! Cheers!
 

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2018 Giulia Quadrifoglio
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Excellent write and results. Looks pretty straight forward. Did you install sways at the same time, or just springs for now?
 

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Out of curiosity why replace the sensors? I have put on at least 4 sets of tires on my GTI without putting on new sensors and they have always worked perfectly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Out of curiosity why replace the sensors? I have put on at least 4 sets of tires on my GTI without putting on new sensors and they have always worked perfectly.
I had new wheels / tires installed, which didn't come with TPMS sensors and I didn't want to unmount the stock wheels to use those sensors.
 

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Yeah I just noticed that you got new rims. I did the plus size tires on my GTI's tires and it really filled up the wheel wells and looks 10 X's better. Really digging the lowered stance with your new springs, it's a subtle enough change but is still noticeable and definitely improves the look.
 

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Have any idea if a "long bolt method" would work? Depends on how the lower control arms are attached. You use a jack to release the spring tension and undo the top nut to lower all of the damper out the bottom, taking the lower control arm off. Not sure I'd want to do this on the Quad and part of the reason I got one in the first place. Hmm, just looked at some pictures and the gap does look a little larger than remembered. Hmmmm?
 

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Sorry to revive an old thread but did any of your bsm or parking sensors malfunction since you lowered the car? I had a mazda 6 I slammed and the bsm lost its mind when the ride height was adjusted.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sorry to revive an old thread but did any of your bsm or parking sensors malfunction since you lowered the car? I had a mazda 6 I slammed and the bsm lost its mind when the ride height was adjusted.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
I've had no issues thus far...
 

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Sorry to revive an old thread but did any of your bsm or parking sensors malfunction since you lowered the car? I had a mazda 6 I slammed and the bsm lost its mind when the ride height was adjusted.
Hmm... You could test things by placing a 2x4 or something on the ground and slowly drive up to it.

I have the stock springs and ride height still. Sometimes a parking stopper will trigger the alarm and other times not. I'll guess that is four inches. I've never had a reason to actually measure one before.
 

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If anyone is curious about how the q4 compares to the q2. The strut, endlink and sway bar are different. Everything seems designed around the axle. The springs I used were labeled for the q2 but everything went on fine.


Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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If anyone is curious about how the q4 compares to the q2. The strut, endlink and sway bar are different. Everything seems designed around the axle. The springs I used were labeled for the q2 but everything went on fine.


Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
Looks Sweet! Which springs did u use? Eibach?

Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk
 
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