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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone upgraded their quadrifoglio from the standard iron brake/caliper set to the optional carbon/ceramic setup. Cost is not an issue, just like to know if anyone has done this, or know of any companies that offer such an upgrade. If this has been done i'll need a parts list of components that must be changed to effect the upgrade.

Thanks
 

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Technically this can be done and we can order the parts for you. I believe you will need rotors, calipers, pads, and brackets at all 4 corners. The dust shields may also be different with the larger carbon brakes.

What is not known is if the brake software calibration is different between the steel and CCB brakes. I suspect it is, as I have read some info on how the CCB system doesn't allow full brake force until a certain temperature is reached to prevent glazing of the carbon rotors.

So you would probably need to get your dealership involved in the process to reprogram the software and also to bleed the brakes after the swap, because the brake-by-wire system doesn't allow traditional brake bleeding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
On another note, i was checking out your website, and i'm curious if you offer any ecu programming? If so my assumption is that the ecu needs to be remove. where is it located on the Quad? and whats involved in removing it.
 

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On another note, i was checking out your website, and i'm curious if you offer any ecu programming? If so my assumption is that the ecu needs to be remove. where is it located on the Quad? and whats involved in removing it.
We have been happily selling the Eurocompulsion tunes for the 4C, Giulia (2.0T), and Stelvio (2.0T).

We will be offering their Giulia Quadrifoglio tune as soon as it is ready for general release.

The ECU is located on the firewall behind the engine. There are actually 2 individual ECUs on this engine. They are in separate brackets. You do need to remove quite a bit of wiring to access them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Are their any diagrams online or photos of the removal? do both units come out or just one?
 

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So you would probably need to get your dealership involved in the process to reprogram the software
That's the biggest question mark in my mind. Many automakers are really putting the clampdown on software and what they will allow on a per VIN basis. Even if an Alfa Romeo dealer has competent technicians and a wiTECH subscription, there's no guarantee FCA will allow that software calibration for the ultra-*high-*performance Brembo carbon ceramic material (CCM) brake system equipped Quadrifoglio to be downloaded and installed on the Integrated Control Unit (ICU) of another car that wasn't factory equipped with those brakes. The only way to tell is to try it.

I have no doubt that some people will modify their cars with no clue how the electronic control systems will be effected. Hopefully there is enough reserve capacity in the system to adapt to whatever changes people do (e.g. fit super sticky tires that greatly expand the performance envelope, fit bigger rotors that radically alter the amount of brake torque that can be applied, etc.) but they might not realize the full benefits of the hardware changes if they don't address the calibration of the underlying electronic control systems, which may be technically impossible to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well went to dealer today to price out the parts to upgrade to the ceramic option and it was insane. $6000 a piece for the rotors, yes SIX THOUSAND DOLLARS EACH total of all parts was just under $30,000 no wonder people are downgrading to the iron setup. With this info I contacted Brembo directly to see if the components can be had elsewhere as i'm sure the OEM prices are grossly inflated, well obviously inflated, since the option when ordered on a new car is only $8000. So we'll see what Brembo comes back with and i'll post. On another note if there's anyone out there who has the Ceramic option an wants to downgrade let me know. I see there are a couple of companies out there selling the iron setup as a complete kit, so i'd be willing to make a trade.
 

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Your dealer is probably quoting you full retail price (or more) which is just absurd. Sadly, it seems no Alfa dealers have stepped up their game to corner the market for discount OEM parts sales online. The few Chrysler/ Dodge/ Jeep/ Ram dealers who do a lot of online Mopar parts sales are way behind updating their catalog to serve Alfa customers. With how mediocre sales are, you’d think that Alfa dealers would be looking for new revenue streams. Internet/ mail order OEM parts at a discount is a good way to do that. I’ve seen dealers of other makes like BMW, Mazda, etc. do this quite successfully. Not sure if there’s something in the Alfa franchise agreement that prohibits this.

The part number for the front CCM rotors is 68329913AA. You need two of them. If Brembo or RPS or someone else can supply equivalent rotors as service replacement parts for a fraction of the price then I’d probably go that route.

CCM rotors are great because they’re lightweight and can tolerate high heat well. And when used on the street should last a very long time provided they don’t suffer impact damage from road hazard like stone or improper tire/wheel mounting and dismounting. But i know with the Porsche 911 guys they were having lots of wear and tear on their CCM rotors when used aggressively on the race track. Not sure if that problem has been resolved or if it also affects the Giulia Quadrifoglio. I know that the reason a lot of 911 track guys downgraded to cast iron was because rotor replacement was frequent, iron was a fraction of the cost and there was greater pad choice.
 

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Sorry to resurrect an old thread but I have the same question and have not been able to find an answer. I’m hoping to upgrade the standard brakes to carbon ceramics. Has anyone done this successfully? I understand the costs involved, but is this even possible?
 

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Sorry to resurrect an old thread but I have the same question and have not been able to find an answer. I’m hoping to upgrade the standard brakes to carbon ceramics. Has anyone done this successfully? I understand the costs involved, but is this even possible?
the two people I know that I would consider the most reliable and knowledgeable about these cars both say they are uncertain it can be done from a software perspective. Just give me $5k for the advice and it will save you a lot more in the long run.
 

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Has anyone upgraded their quadrifoglio from the standard iron brake/caliper set to the optional carbon/ceramic setup. Cost is not an issue, just like to know if anyone has done this, or know of any companies that offer such an upgrade. If this has been done i'll need a parts list of components that must be changed to effect the upgrade.

Thanks
We offer Girdisc options which are a solid rotor with slots. Unless you are looking for the drilled look. To do a complete OEM swap, there is a lot too it but I am sure it can be done. Some suspension components need to be changed too. I might have all the parts needed to the swap. Otherwise a less expensive and more simple option is the girodisc which are fantastic and we use them with a Porterfield R4S pad.

109981

 

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We offer Girdisc options which are a solid rotor with slots. Unless you are looking for the drilled look. To do a complete OEM swap, there is a lot too it but I am sure it can be done. Some suspension components need to be changed too. I might have all the parts needed to the swap. Otherwise a less expensive and more simple option is the girodisc which are fantastic and we use them with a Porterfield R4S pad.

View attachment 109981

Thanks Jason! I’ll give you a call this upcoming week to discuss.
 
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the two people I know that I would consider the most reliable and knowledgeable about these cars both say they are uncertain it can be done from a software perspective. Just give me $5k for the advice and it will save you a lot more in the long run.
That’s what I’ve heard too. What I’m wondering is, has anyone given it a go? Is it confirmed that the software won’t work with the CCM upgrade? The tech I’m working with is worried that the temp sensors won’t work with the software, but frankly that’s a small issue for me. I just want to know if the brakes will grab and stop the car if we install them.
 

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That’s what I’ve heard too. What I’m wondering is, has anyone given it a go? Is it confirmed that the software won’t work with the CCM upgrade? The tech I’m working with is worried that the temp sensors won’t work with the software, but frankly that’s a small issue for me. I just want to know if the brakes will grab and stop the car if we install them.
I am not aware of anyone trying it since it’s a very costly gamble. One that at best you now have CCB brakes that are completely overrated and at worst you just wasted several 10s of thousands. But by all means I’m sure it’s possible somehow. Like @Alfissimo said you might need some additional modifications. Most people swap CCB for iron since they are cheaper and easier to replace. If you are tracking the car you are better off with iron girodisc or tarox.
 

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I am not aware of anyone trying it since it’s a very costly gamble. One that at best you now have CCB brakes that are completely overrated and at worst you just wasted several 10s of thousands. But by all means I’m sure it’s possible somehow. Like @Alfissimo said you might need some additional modifications. Most people swap CCB for iron since they are cheaper and easier to replace. If you are tracking the car you are better off with iron girodisc or tarox.
I’ve been thinking about that too since what I’m most concerned about is getting those bigger calipers. I am lucky enough to live right by an amazing canyon road but it’s got sheer drops of many hundred feet. Had one or two close calls and am looking for the best brakes possible to minimize those occasions.
 

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I’ve been thinking about that too since what I’m most concerned about is getting those bigger calipers. I am lucky enough to live right by an amazing canyon road but it’s got sheer drops of many hundred feet. Had one or two close calls and am looking for the best brakes possible to minimize those occasions.
I can’t speak on your driving style but if the stock rotors are not enough to stop you I would guess you may be driving it too fast or out of control. And I’m all for speed my friend. The tarox and girodisc are gonna dissipate heat better. So in that regard you can get more life and won’t wear as fast as stock but as far as canyon saving capabilities I can’t speak on that. I run tarox. They are slightly better than stock. Less wear and heat but stopping is maybe 5% better. Your pads would be best bet. Raybestos. Porterfield. Tarox. Hawk. EBC. Plenty of options.
 
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