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If I am not mistaken, Alfa Romeo US has marketed exactly two powertrains over the last 5 years, a 2.0 and a 2.9.
I have an out of warranty 2018 Giulia 2.0

With about 40K mis on it, I figured it would be prudent to change the serpentine belt. So a few days ago, while driving, I called the Alfa dealer in Portland, Or about 25 mis away. After connecting to the "parts dept" I asked if they could give me the price on a new belt, just the belt. I was very politely told he needed the VIN. I told him he misunderstood, the car was not under warranty, I did not want AR to install the belt. I just needed a part from the parts dept and the part was the belt.

I was then told there was no way to look up ANY part without a vin. Ive owned maybe 35 cars over the last 55 yrs and I have never heard a crock like that. I remained pleasant and told him I was driving and could not look at the VIN. He politely told me, too bad this is company policy and that "the computer won't open" unless he puts in a vin

I countered: OK. You guys basically work only on two engines, can you at least give me a ball park price on the belt? Can't be that hard a question!

No. No. and No. I got home, spent about 3 mins on the web, and saw I could buy the belt from Autozone for $26.00.

I checked with a couple of speed shops near me and both told me they would be happy to install it for about $100 i.e. an hour or so of labor.

As to the dealer in question: earlier this year I asked how much for a belt change installed and was told they only installed the belt "in a bundle." Oil change, cabin filter, plugs and the belt. And only $1100.00

Well some of us were born at night but not last night. Back of the envelope math reveals the following data:
Oil change anywhere but Alfa... about $125 max max. Belt: 26 dollars in parts. Cabin filter: prob about $20 in parts. New plugs: top line MAYBE $80. So Alfa is basically charging near $900 "labor for this very minor work." I dont know... I think I have changed a cabin filter maybe twice in my life. Maybe the Alfa filter takes 10 hrs?? LOL Who cares?

I love my car and bought my first Alfa in1969 (a 62 Giulietta). But when Alfa leaves the US market in another yr or two you will know why. It's not about the reliability of the build, but rather about the horrible service network that stands behind it.
 

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1) Sounds like road trips to AR of Tacoma will be in order. Your closest dealership sounds awful. Don’t be afraid to visit some local FCA car dealerships and see what maintenance they will be willing to do for you. Others on here have gone that route. Just plan on bringing your own parts and fluids.

2) Get ready for a very frustrating car for DIY. Everything from no dipstick and over 20 bolts to remove the undertray for an oil change to a cabin filter location that satan himself came up with.
 

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2017 Giulia Ti Sport Q4
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1) Sounds like road trips to AR of Tacoma will be in order. Your closest dealership sounds awful. Don’t be afraid to visit some local FCA car dealerships and see what maintenance they will be willing to do for you. Others on here have gone that route. Just plan on bringing your own parts and fluids.

2) Get ready for a very frustrating car for DIY. Everything from no dipstick and over 20 bolts to remove the undertray for an oil change to a cabin filter location that satan himself came up with.
To address your point 2, it has been a very easy car for DIY. Sure there are a bunch of bolts for the undertray, but they are easy to take off. Everything on top of engine, including the belt are super easy to do. Many cabin filters are a pain to get to, but still not hard once you know the procedure.

@Squelch Here is the belt procedure.
 

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To address your point 2, it has been a very easy car for DIY. Sure there are a bunch of bolts for the undertray, but they are easy to take off. Everything on top of engine, including the belt are super easy to do. Many cabin filters are a pain to get to, but still not hard once you know the procedure.

@Squelch Here is the belt procedure.
I think it's a stretch to say the car is VERY EASY to DIY, though it is certainly doable. I personally agree with OP that the front underbody panel is obnoxious and adds a lot of time to service. Also really hate the lack of a true dipstick. My level sensor is crap and took weeks to show updated level, despite idling on flat ground several times. The cabin filter is nothing short of a nightmare any way you slice it. Getting the old exhaust off to install a catback was also pretty hairy due to hard to reach hangers in the rear valence. My biggest gripe overall is that Alfa uses 10 different types of fasteners to secure all these underbody shields and a few of mine have rusted to pretty much nothing in a short time.

I've only done the rear brakes, but they were much easier than the VW/Audis I've done. LSD fluid was easy. Haven't tried belt or plugs yet, but the DIYs look okay.
 

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2020 Giulia QV
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I've run into the not quoting any parts without a VIN at both Ford and Alfa Romeo now. Annoyingly on a Fiesta ST I had several years ago there was some sort of mixup in the VIN that provided the wrong information. So when I needed a new wing mirror after a deer hit me (I didn't hit it, nope), they quoted an $800 heated replacement that my car didn't have, and wouldn't let me order the unheated one. I ended up getting the correct mirror with a pre-painted cap off of ebay for something like $150. Feel kind of bad for whoever got that car after I traded it in. If they ever need parts anyway.
 

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2018 Giulia Ti Sport Q4
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It's because they don't want to end up selling you the wrong part and the Vin gets them directly to the right part. With so many variations, I get it.

But yeah they should've been able to say, the belt for this car is somewhere between x and y
 

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I think it's a stretch to say the car is VERY EASY to DIY, though it is certainly doable. I personally agree with OP that the front underbody panel is obnoxious and adds a lot of time to service. Also really hate the lack of a true dipstick. My level sensor is crap and took weeks to show updated level, despite idling on flat ground several times. The cabin filter is nothing short of a nightmare any way you slice it. Getting the old exhaust off to install a catback was also pretty hairy due to hard to reach hangers in the rear valence. My biggest gripe overall is that Alfa uses 10 different types of fasteners to secure all these underbody shields and a few of mine have rusted to pretty much nothing in a short time.

I've only done the rear brakes, but they were much easier than the VW/Audis I've done. LSD fluid was easy. Haven't tried belt or plugs yet, but the DIYs look okay.
I mean it is no harder than working on my other cars over the years. As you said the only minor inconvenience is the undertray, but I have my drill that takes those right off without issue so it only takes a minute.

I've done oil changes, filter, plugs, rear diff, starter relay. I have not yet done the cabin filter, but I see the procedure and it is easy enough, just time consuming. Tomorrow I will be doing all 4 rotors and pads, brake fluid flush, front diff and transfer case. Belt is easy to do as well. I am thankful for the amount of space they have in the engine bay which makes everything easy to get at. Compared to my wife's Mazda with the crammed FWD engine bay, this is easy. Dipstick is dumb, yes, but I am changing at 5-6K anyways so no real need for seeing it since our car has a sensor.
 

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It's pretty Operating Standard Procedure for dealerships to look at part numbers only by the car's VIN. There is no issue to provide VIN's to dealerships, if that is they need to look at parts and prices. I am sure that there are also dealerships that can give you parts numbers, prices and everything with no VIN numbers and just asking the questions to them.
 

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I had to change the oil on both my Giulia and the wife's C300 over the weekend. Both have a lot of screws that need to be taken out to remove the under panels. draining and filling the oil is easy on both cars. However, changing the oil filter on the Giulia is quite a bit easier then the C300 where you have to disconnect and partially remove the cold air intake and the turbo air intake just to get to the cap on the oil filter. Damn Germans...

Checking the oil level was about 5 minutes on the Giulia and on the C300 it took a 20 minute drive and being parked for 5 minutes before it would even attempt to read the oil level.

I miss the days of oil dip sticks.
 

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Well, the QV does have a dipstick but lots of new cars do not. The vin run, I have been told, is due to the FCA system--it won't let them even move to the next screen without a vin.

I do change my own oil and filters--not that hard. The 30k maintenance on the QV is famously expensive. I think I will also do that myself.
 
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@Squelch, providing the VIN helps to assure that you get the correct part for your vehicle. That is the way ALL new car dealerships work in the era of modern data bases. Just do it; it is in your best interest. It is unfortunate that your dealership is a stealership. Mine is not. This is not just an Alfa problem. Goes across all makes.
@Engi_Nerd, and all. The oil level checking procedure in the manual is incorrect. To quickly, and accurately check the level, press the start button WITHOUT touching the brake pedal. The ignition will come alive and the oil level will be displayed between the speedo and tach, not on the infotainment display. There are threads here discussing this. For a most accurate reading, the engine should be at full operating temperature, and the vehicle parked on a flat surface. After shutting off hot engine, wait a minute, or two. To test this procedure, perform the above then drive to a steep incline and perform again. It will instantly show a different reading. My local Dodge - Jeep dealer will perform oil service on Giulia 2.0, using Mopar MO-339 filter and Mopar Max-Pro 0W-30 oil for about $75, out the door. Includes resetting the reminder.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
@Squelch, providing the VIN helps to assure that you get the correct part for your vehicle. That is the way ALL new car dealerships work in the era of modern data bases. Just do it; it is in your best interest. It is unfortunate that your dealership is a stealership. Mine is not. This is not just an Alfa problem. Goes across all makes.
@Engi_Nerd, and all. The oil level checking procedure in the manual is incorrect. To quickly, and accurately check the level, press the start button WITHOUT touching the brake pedal. The ignition will come alive and the oil level will be displayed between the speedo and tach, not on the infotainment display. There are threads here discussing this. For a most accurate reading, the engine should be at full operating temperature, and the vehicle parked on a flat surface. After shutting off hot engine, wait a minute, or two. To test this procedure, perform the above then drive to a steep incline and perform again. It will instantly show a different reading. My local Dodge - Jeep dealer will perform oil service on Giulia 2.0, using Mopar MO-339 filter and Mopar Max-Pro 0W-30 oil for about $75, out the door. Includes resetting the reminder.
I fully understand why a parts dept MIGHT need a VIN to make sure the part is the right one.... But as I said.. we are dealing with TWO platforms... I suspect the QV belt may be the same as the 2.0, which would add up to a total of ONE belt.... this is not a Dodge or a Chevy or a Ford with multiple possibilties. With AR we are dealing with two, or one! That the parts dept (which is the same as the service dept at this dealer could not say, well we can't look it up but it's about a XX dollar part is truly very very poor service. The clear message here is We Dont Give AF.
 

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2018 Q4 with Fiamenghi Ti exhaust, Race Mod, and Tecnico wheels.
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If I go to the local Mopar parts department and ask for a part for my MY 2000 Dodge Ram 2500, they say "what is the VIN" and nothing happens without it. It has been this way for at least 10 years.

There are 19 bolts on the engine belly pan of my MY2018 Q4. I believe the magic number is 19 for all 4 cylinder Giulia models. If you DIY, count them and beware that they are not all the same even though they look the same. Keep count so that you are sure you put all of them back on and tightened them all. Get a good ratchet or nut driver and the bolts do not take much time to R&R. The specs say 5.5 quarts of oil capacity; I just dump in 5 liters and have not had any problem. Keep in mind that you don't need the oil to be filled to "full", IMO midway between too low and too high is best.

I found it is a little less than a hour of work to R&R the accessory belt. Be sure to re-install the belt correctly; it will wrap on 2 different ways, but only stay on if installed the right way.

To R&R the cabin filter search for the forum instructions. Removing the glove box (a lot easier than it sounds) makes the filter R&R much easier.

At least for where I drive, the belt replacement and cabin filter replacement were totally unnecessary.

$1100 for that work is way too much, btw.
 

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If I am not mistaken, Alfa Romeo US has marketed exactly two powertrains over the last 5 years, a 2.0 and a 2.9.
I have an out of warranty 2018 Giulia 2.0

With about 40K mis on it, I figured it would be prudent to change the serpentine belt. So a few days ago, while driving, I called the Alfa dealer in Portland, Or about 25 mis away. After connecting to the "parts dept" I asked if they could give me the price on a new belt, just the belt. I was very politely told he needed the VIN. I told him he misunderstood, the car was not under warranty, I did not want AR to install the belt. I just needed a part from the parts dept and the part was the belt.

I was then told there was no way to look up ANY part without a vin. Ive owned maybe 35 cars over the last 55 yrs and I have never heard a crock like that. I remained pleasant and told him I was driving and could not look at the VIN. He politely told me, too bad this is company policy and that "the computer won't open" unless he puts in a vin

I countered: OK. You guys basically work only on two engines, can you at least give me a ball park price on the belt? Can't be that hard a question!

No. No. and No. I got home, spent about 3 mins on the web, and saw I could buy the belt from Autozone for $26.00.

I checked with a couple of speed shops near me and both told me they would be happy to install it for about $100 i.e. an hour or so of labor.

As to the dealer in question: earlier this year I asked how much for a belt change installed and was told they only installed the belt "in a bundle." Oil change, cabin filter, plugs and the belt. And only $1100.00

Well some of us were born at night but not last night. Back of the envelope math reveals the following data:
Oil change anywhere but Alfa... about $125 max max. Belt: 26 dollars in parts. Cabin filter: prob about $20 in parts. New plugs: top line MAYBE $80. So Alfa is basically charging near $900 "labor for this very minor work." I dont know... I think I have changed a cabin filter maybe twice in my life. Maybe the Alfa filter takes 10 hrs?? LOL Who cares?

I love my car and bought my first Alfa in1969 (a 62 Giulietta). But when Alfa leaves the US market in another yr or two you will know why. It's not about the reliability of the build, but rather about the horrible service network that stands behind it.
bought OEM belt for the 2.0L yesterday $22 on eBay
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Parts department was correct and your wrong just give him the vin.
That's hard to do while driving. I have been an avid car consumer for 55 yrs. I know what is right and what is wrong. Better said, I know when a car dealer wants to keep your business and one where they don't care a whiff, Thank you anyway for your curt and mistaken opinion.
 
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