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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,
I checked out the powerstop Z23 brake pads, as they list them as being compatible with the giulia ('17). But I can't help but think that they look smaller compared to the rear calipers.

Are these pads truly compatible?

Thanks in advance.
 

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2018 Giulia Q4
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@Vml - Did you have any issues replacing the rear pads on your 18 Ti Sport ? Mine are down to 3mm on both sides and therefore need to be replaced very soon. The dealer wants over $1,117 to do the job (includes rotors), plus $207 for a brake fluid flush. I am debating if the rotors really need to be replaced as they look almost perfect to me.
 

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@Vml - Did you have any issues replacing the rear pads on your 18 Ti Sport ? Mine are down to 3mm on both sides and therefore need to be replaced very soon. The dealer wants over $1,117 to do the job (includes rotors), plus $207 for a brake fluid flush. I am debating if the rotors really need to be replaced as they look almost perfect to me.
I would bring it to a outside mechanic shop. I bring mine to mechanic shops out there and they did my brakes $600 cdn labour, plus i bought the front pads and rear pads separately. The $600 includes replacing the brake pads, flushing the brake fluids, lubing the components of the brakes becoz mine had uneven wear on pads, ( outside vs inside) and putting a litre of the castrol SRT brake fluid in....
 

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@Vml - Did you have any issues replacing the rear pads on your 18 Ti Sport ? Mine are down to 3mm on both sides and therefore need to be replaced very soon. The dealer wants over $1,117 to do the job (includes rotors), plus $207 for a brake fluid flush. I am debating if the rotors really need to be replaced as they look almost perfect to me.
I did not have any issues. Went to settings and activated the brake service mode and then worked on the rear calipers like in any other car. Pushed back the piston and installed the new pads. No new rotors needed in my case as I measured them and still had plenty of meat. Also didn’t disconnect the battery. What is very important to do is to pump the brakes so that the pads are in intimate contact with the rotor BEFORE you turn the car on. Although this car is brake by wire, there is still a fail safe hydraulic circuit that let you pump a limited amount of fluid. If there is a gap between the pad and rotor before you turn on the car, you’ll get an error.
Dealer here in the Pittsburgh area charges about $600 for the job, which I found quite reasonable but I’m always cheaper than the dealer. I did have the dealer perform the brake fluid flush during an inspection and it was ~$180.00 or so.
 

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Thanks for your help. I’m almost certainly going to do this myself. Do you know what the minimum rear rotor thickness is by any chance? I have looked but didn’t see the figure anywhere.
 

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Thanks for your help. I’m almost certainly going to do this myself. Do you know what the minimum rear rotor thickness is by any chance? I have looked but didn’t see the figure anywhere.
According to the post below, 20 mm. 22 mm is the original spec when new.
 

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I did not have any issues. Went to settings and activated the brake service mode and then worked on the rear calipers like in any other car. Pushed back the piston and installed the new pads. No new rotors needed in my case as I measured them and still had plenty of meat. Also didn’t disconnect the battery. What is very important to do is to pump the brakes so that the pads are in intimate contact with the rotor BEFORE you turn the car on. Although this car is brake by wire, there is still a fail safe hydraulic circuit that let you pump a limited amount of fluid. If there is a gap between the pad and rotor before you turn on the car, you’ll get an error.
Dealer here in the Pittsburgh area charges about $600 for the job, which I found quite reasonable but I’m always cheaper than the dealer. I did have the dealer perform the brake fluid flush during an inspection and it was ~$180.00 or so.
Pushing the piston in and not opening the brake caliper bleeder screw is asking for trouble in the long run. Calipers brake fluid chamber accumulates moisture and dirt, so when the piston is pushed back in all of the dirty fluid plus dirt goes to the master cylinder and ABS pump. Granted our cars don't have an ABS pump but we still have an electric motor generating brake fluid system pressure. This best practice should be followed more often.
 

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Pushing the piston in and not opening the brake caliper bleeder screw is asking for trouble in the long run. Calipers brake fluid chamber accumulates moisture and dirt, so when the piston is pushed back in all of the dirty fluid plus dirt goes to the master cylinder and ABS pump. Granted our cars don't have an ABS pump but we still have an electric motor generating brake fluid system pressure. This best practice should be followed more often.
No doubt best practice. However, in the case of rear brakes it’s a lot less of an issue as there is a long way to go to reach the pumps. A second advantage of The-Dude method is that is not necessary to check the brake fluid reservoir for overflowing, but a disadvantage is that every time the bleeder is opened is an opportunity for air to get in the system so I would only recommend using this technique to people with experience bleeding brakes and with the proper tool (clear tubing).
 

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For those that used the Z23, what was the friction rating? I was told GG by their C/S but I believe another member on here stated his were FF or FG.
 
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