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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone experienced where the car stumbles during part throttle? This only occurs in D/N modes, but not A mode. It seems the car is struggling to open the throttle partially and causes the car to now accelerate smoothly.

Never happens when 50% throttle or more. Most pronounced at lower surface street speeds where you're just humming along to maintain pace.
 

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A little. It seems to go away after the car is up to normal operating temperature. Which engine do you have? I have the 2.0 gasoline.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A little. It seems to go away after the car is up to normal operating temperature. Which engine do you have? I have the 2.0 gasoline.
I have the same. seems to happen whenever it feels like, but oddly enough doesn't happen much in Advanced Efficiency mode. I guess I'll just keep an eye on it and see if it creates a real problem down the road.
 

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Yes i have only in hot climates and when I have been driving around. Twice i almost caused a wreck for the lack of car going... I have 2019 Ti. Dealer said it was the computer not catching when shifting but I always drive it in D. So this claim is false.
 

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I notice same, but I feel like it more related to the drive by wire signal sensitivity during partial throttle, kind of like car senses u are pressing it then slight modulation and movement of foot changes the signal response causing that feeling, cause when it's not slight you don't experience it
 

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Sounds like a problem I had a while ago: Giulia Ti Q4 Second (negative) Impressions


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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When driving my "03 sport model Jaguar X sedan, when I fully accelerated, then would momentarily let up on the throttle, it was as if the ECU just didn't know what to do. Upshift, downshift, be prepared to accelerate in the same gear again, so it would just not do much of anything for a second or two. Granted, it was a much simpler, more primitive car compared to what we have now, but I think an ECU sometimes may have to pause as if in "now what?" mode momentarily. But best I suppose to have someone check out your own car to see if it is doing what it should do. And could it be low-rpm turbo "lag?'

Let us know what you find out. NV
 

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I have had this with many turbo cars that I've owned. Fly by wire or cable. I have found that manually downshifting before stepping on the gas helps a lot. I think that it has to do a little with throttle response and a little with turbo lag.
 

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when I was younger, and had my much modified Superformance 425 Cobra replica, with about 500 stout ponies up front, sometimes (this is several decades ago) would come up against some potent turbo car, and do several seconds of "roll on", I would take them for a second or so until I would back off, knowing that my naturally aspirated engine would have immediate power, while their turbo would take a second or so to "spool up" for full boost. If you want low speed acceleration from a turbo, you need to drop down a gear or two to "spool up" your boost in anticipation. Which is why I drive in D in traffic. A turbo car usually has a lower compression engine, so low rpm power may be less than the non-boosted version of that motor. Modern computer management of turbo cars has permitted much higher CR engines that in past years, though.

You need to be a "thinking man" (or woman) to get the most of a turbo car.

NV
 

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when I was younger, and had my much modified Superformance 425 Cobra replica, with about 500 stout ponies up front, sometimes (this is several decades ago) would come up against some potent turbo car, and do several seconds of "roll on", I would take them for a second or so until I would back off, knowing that my naturally aspirated engine would have immediate power, while their turbo would take a second or so to "spool up" for full boost. If you want low speed acceleration from a turbo, you need to drop down a gear or two to "spool up" your boost in anticipation. Which is why I drive in D in traffic. A turbo car usually has a lower compression engine, so low rpm power may be less than the non-boosted version of that motor. Modern computer management of turbo cars has permitted much higher CR engines that in past years, though.

You need to be a "thinking man" (or woman) to get the most of a turbo car.

NV
 
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