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Yesterday I got off work and into my car, and the TPMS light came on, saying my rear passenger tire was at 10PSI. I got out to look and the tire did not look flat, so I shrugged it off as a TPMS malfunction and went on to drive home. But that all changed when I got on the freeway. Definitely noticed something odd in the handling, so I took it easy, never going above 60mph. I am so glad this car has runflats now, because it is allowing me to make it to a repair shop.

Since it's a FCA corporate lease, I was told I can take it to any FCA-authorized dealer to get tires repaired, so I stopped at the nearest FCA dealer, a Dodge/RAM one. Unsurprisingly, they had no idea what an Alfa was, but they were very helpful in trying to solve the problem. After trying to work with it, the boss man realized I had run-flats (I swore I told him that from the beginning, but I digress) and told me they did not have the tools to repair or replace one.

After 10 more scary and anxious miles, I made it to my local Alfa/Fiat dealer an hour before they close. The service staff were extremely helpful and were able to get my tire replaced just before they closed, but only just. I must've hit a nail on my way to work that morning, parked it, and while it was parked, the nail/puncture item fell out, leaving all my precious air to go away :(
 

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Had almost the same experience. My tire valve became bent after a hand car wash guy must have kicked it. Drove it to my dealer and was informed they didn't have the equipment to change a run flat. I said to them" I bought it from you guys and you can't replace the tire?", they sent it out and I got it later in the day. What a crock of sh*t
 

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Really glad that it turned out well.

Two points. I always carry a tire pressure gauge in my glove compartment so that I can check my tires whenever I want. In my experience tire pressure sensors can be slightly off but if you ever get a really low reading you have a problem.

I don't claim to be attire expert, but I have had Bridgestone run run flat tires on my car and can tell you that they were taken on and off with regular tire changing equipment. As for repairs, I know of no reason why they wouldn't be repairable in the same way as a standard tire. Obviously tires cannot be repaired if the puncture is too close to the edge of the tread, on the side wall, or involves a large hole.
 
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Wednesday night I was out with clients and the indicator light came on saying driver rear tire was at 21 psi. Put air in and next morning was at 10 PSI. Called the dealer and they said they can only replace the tire. Took the car to the local great tire place and they found two screws in tne center of the tire. They took the tire off the rim and patched both holes. $35 and back in the road. I liked the fact that the run flats allowed me to keep using the car.
 

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Wednesday night I was out with clients and the indicator light came on saying driver rear tire was at 21 psi. Put air in and next morning was at 10 PSI. Called the dealer and they said they can only replace the tire. Took the car to the local great tire place and they found two screws in tne center of the tire. They took the tire off the rim and patched both holes. $35 and back in the road. I liked the fact that the run flats allowed me to keep using the car.
Why did the dealer say they can only replace the tire? I had this response once with a BMW I had with run flats. After a bit of research I discovered that when run flats first came out manufacturers stated that they should not be repaired. However after a couple of years on the market they changed their tune and advised that a patch repair is acceptable for a puncture that would be repairable in a non run flat. A patch is quite reliable unlike a plug which can sometimes come out.
 

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I have had a bmw with run flats for ten years - and have had them plugged and patched.
the last time the tire shop advised that they consider a plug preferable, as there is less inside rubber thickness than with regular tires, so scuffing for the patch is not advised.
I've never had a plug come out on any tire.

anyways, get them repaired at any tire shop, no "special equipment required", just get a portable compressor so you can keep sufficient air in it, so you know the sidewall has not been damaged. having a plug kit in the trunk is a good thing too.
 

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I have had a bmw with run flats for ten years - and have had them plugged and patched.
the last time the tire shop advised that they consider a plug preferable, as there is less inside rubber thickness than with regular tires, so scuffing for the patch is not advised.
I've never had a plug come out on any tire.

anyways, get them repaired at any tire shop, no "special equipment required", just get a portable compressor so you can keep sufficient air in it, so you know the sidewall has not been damaged. having a plug kit in the trunk is a good thing too.
The tire shops wouldn't be bothered. I needed a new valve, not a patch or plug, so I went to the dealer. I bet if I wanted 4 tires, Mavis Discount Tire would miraculously have the correct machine to pull run flats off.
 

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Wednesday night I was out with clients and the indicator light came on saying driver rear tire was at 21 psi. Put air in and next morning was at 10 PSI. Called the dealer and they said they can only replace the tire. Took the car to the local great tire place and they found two screws in tne center of the tire. They took the tire off the rim and patched both holes. $35 and back in the road. I liked the fact that the run flats allowed me to keep using the car.
Many of our local tire shops will patch tires for free. Bless them.
 
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I have the Pirelli RFTs. Pirelli’s policy is that a puncture can’t be repaired on their RFTs. However, their RFTs have an enhanced road hazard warranty. My local specialist tire shop refused to go contrary to Pirelli’s guidance.
 

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Yesterday I got off work and into my car, and the TPMS light came on, saying my rear passenger tire was at 10PSI. I got out to look and the tire did not look flat, so I shrugged it off as a TPMS malfunction and went on to drive home. But that all changed when I got on the freeway. Definitely noticed something odd in the handling, so I took it easy, never going above 60mph. I am so glad this car has runflats now, because it is allowing me to make it to a repair shop.(
Maybe a lesson here is that perhaps the run flats might not appear to be flat at 10 psi because of the sidewall strength. So be sure and check with a tire gauge like I carry in my trunk to make sure. :)
 
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Maybe a lesson here is that perhaps the run flats might not appear to be flat at 10 psi because of the sidewall strength. So be sure and check with a tire gauge like I carry in my trunk to make sure. :)
I second the motion to always carry a tire pressure gauge. Be familiar with how to use it as well, some gauges can be a little fiddly.

FWIW: My TPMS, both OEM and after market have been very accurate, agreeing with my pressure gauge reading within 1 PSI.

The RFTs add 2-3 pounds per tire depending on the width of tire that you have installed. IMO: if you want the most performance from the car on real roads you do not want RFTs. If you aren't canyon carving back country roads (or at least not very frequently) there is plenty of good reason to retain the RFTs.
 
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