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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
HI all,

First time posting here so apologies if I'm in the wrong place. I took my Giulia to a trailhead in the mountains and encountered a terrible, unpaved road when driving in. I tried to reverse out before getting too far in and my front bumper got essentially stuck in a giant pothole on one side of the road. As I reversed I heard a pop, and it led to my front left bumper detaching slightly from the car on the front left tire. You can't really tell unless you look for it, its a few mm's removed from the line and you can pull it partially from the car with your hand. The clips themselves are toast.

I took the car to the dealership and was given a 1500 dollar estimate for repair. The parts themselves didnt seem overwhelming, but my question is does the labor amount make sense to you guys? They said it would take 14 hours to replace the bumper.

And secondly, what risks do I run not replacing it? I assume my car is at more risk to be damaged if I bottom it out, but it feels fairly secure beyond that. Weighing the pros and cons of the expense.

thanks all!
 

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2019 Giulia Ti Q2, Performance Pack
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The overall price looks reasonable. I just did this myself and it was a about 900 in parts and paintwork with me doing the install.

While their labor hour may seem excessive their labor rate is pretty fair so if they did great work id pay that price.
 

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'17 Ti Sport Q4 w/ Active Shocks & LSD
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Another option is to tolerate the broken clips and get 3M epoxy tape involved. Here's how:

  • Remove the T-25 bolt on the forward inside of the wheelwell
  • Free the fascia by actually pulling out and away to clean and observe the mating surfaces between bumper and fascia
  • Clean the surfaces on both the fascia and the inner bumper with isopropanol on a Q-tip, where the tape will be applied
  • Cut custom shapes of 3M epoxy tape to re-mate the surfaces at approximately these locations:

Wheel Tire Automotive parking light Car Vehicle


  • Apply tape to the inner bumper side surfaces, keeping the backing on the tape side facing the fascia, and keeping the fascia apart from the inner bumper. If any clips are still intact, observe how they would mate for the next step
  • Peel the remaining backing off of the fascia side of the tape with hemostat or thin needle-nose pliers and re-mate the fascia with the inner bumper, working from the front towards the wheel well. Insert any clips that didn't break, per your observations in previous step
  • Re-install wheelwell clip and nut, and use a blow-drier or heat gun to set the tape.

I performed this fixup on exactly the same injury to my 953, until I could get a replacement. Got 25,000 miles of gap-free driving.

Hope this helps,

Chris
 

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Literally did the same thing, that estimate is spot on for what it cost me (well, insurance)
I did the 3m tape while I was waiting to get it done, it sort of works as a stopgap measure until you can get it fixed if it's bugging you.
 

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2020 Giulia 2.0 TI Q4 Alfa Rosso
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While I can't speak to the estimate, I can say that the solution that Chris provided is a damn good one. I hit some tire debris on the highway with my old Cruze and received similar bumper damage. I 3M taped it back in place and patched the paint and Carvana didn't even notice the damage when they bought the car off of me. Sure, this baby is no Cruze, but it's still a very viable solution that's worth considering instead of dropping some serious money (and time in the shop) on a replacement.
 

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I did this on one of my cars, clips were broken, and it would not seat properly. I fixed it with one of those small black paper binder clips...worked like a charm...looked good as new. I was able to get at the joint underneath the bumper...took a little creativity to get there but worked great.

I found the clip at the bottom of my desk door so my cost was ZERO.
 

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Are the clips still there or did you lose them? While the 3M trick sounds good, I was actually able to epoxy a lot of my wife's old Evoque's bumper back together well enough that I could reassemble the thing as normal. Whether this will work depends on where the clips are and how they broke, of course.
 

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Are the clips still there or did you lose them? While the 3M trick sounds good, I was actually able to epoxy a lot of my wife's old Evoque's bumper back together well enough that I could reassemble the thing as normal. Whether this will work depends on where the clips are and how they broke, of course.
Never had to replace them. Those binder clips are very strong. This was on an Ford from about 5 years ago.
 

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Never had to replace them. Those binder clips are very strong. This was on an Ford from about 5 years ago.
Hahaha, sorry I meant the actual clips on the bumper. I know the binder clips you're talking about, those suckers are mean and will probably hold until the end of time--just a matter of giving them the right thing to grip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Another option is to tolerate the broken clips and get 3M epoxy tape involved. Here's how:

  • Remove the T-25 bolt on the forward inside of the wheelwell
  • Free the fascia by actually pulling out and away to clean and observe the mating surfaces between bumper and fascia
  • Clean the surfaces on both the fascia and the inner bumper with isopropanol on a Q-tip, where the tape will be applied
  • Cut custom shapes of 3M epoxy tape to re-mate the surfaces at approximately these locations:

View attachment 118008

  • Apply tape to the inner bumper side surfaces, keeping the backing on the tape side facing the fascia, and keeping the fascia apart from the inner bumper. If any clips are still intact, observe how they would mate for the next step
  • Peel the remaining backing off of the fascia side of the tape with hemostat or thin needle-nose pliers and re-mate the fascia with the inner bumper, working from the front towards the wheel well. Insert any clips that didn't break, per your observations in previous step
  • Re-install wheelwell clip and nut, and use a blow-drier or heat gun to set the tape.

I performed this fixup on exactly the same injury to my 953, until I could get a replacement. Got 25,000 miles of gap-free driving.

Hope this helps,

Chris
Thank you so much for the detailed instructions man! Appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Are the clips still there or did you lose them? While the 3M trick sounds good, I was actually able to epoxy a lot of my wife's old Evoque's bumper back together well enough that I could reassemble the thing as normal. Whether this will work depends on where the clips are and how they broke, of course.
Not entirely sure, I will have to check. Thanks!
 

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'17 Ti Sport Q4 w/ Active Shocks & LSD
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Correct. Crosshairs clarifies. I used the 3M™ VHB™ Tape GPH-110GF (1.1mm) and GPH-060GF (.6mm) thickness.

Alfa Romeo uses this same product for all surface mounted external badging (Q4 and G I U L I A on boot, add-on in NA Veloce side badges).
 

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Correct. Crosshairs clarifies. I used the 3M™ VHB™ Tape GPH-110GF (1.1mm) and GPH-060GF (.6mm) thickness.

Alfa Romeo uses this same product for all surface mounted external badging (Q4 and G I U L I A on boot, add-on in NA Veloce side badges).
Ciao, MTB. I broke all the clips on one side of my lower fascia when I got hung up on a concrete parking block. I have been using Weld Bond Epoxy but seems I have to redo the job every year. Do you think the 3M VHB tape would be a better and more durable solution. (It certainly seems like it would be an easier install eliminating the curing time and clamping necessary with the liquid epoxy.). Thanks for any feedback.
 

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'17 Ti Sport Q4 w/ Active Shocks & LSD
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I think it might... I got a full 9 seasons plus (two winters) from my application. I think a real important step is excellent cleaning of the mating surfaces with strong isopropyl alcohol (I used 90%, from a fresh bottle). Not so sure the heat gun/hair dryer was critical, unless it is a cold day. I would also make sure I removed with an exacto knife, any residual epoxy left over from your prior repair.

The stuff is cheap, and I used the extra supply sent for my QV spoiler plus some of what I already had in my toolbox.

Good luck!
 
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