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Get a new battery and it will be fine…

But for real… loved reading through this thread. Please keep updating us! This is cool.
 
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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
While I hunt for chassis/body pieces I’m thinking I’ll turn my attention to the interior airbags and windshield. Does anyone have experience with windshield replacement? Anything to watch out for (other than then the broken glass :LOL: ) or recommend any services/suppliers in particular? Same question for the airbags.

My thought is to replace the passenger airbag while the window is out so that I can remove the dash pabel with a bit more ease - I just hate trying to work in tight corners, especially in this 90F weather we’re having.
 

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While I hunt for chassis/body pieces I’m thinking I’ll turn my attention to the interior airbags and windshield. Does anyone have experience with windshield replacement? Anything to watch out for (other than then the broken glass :LOL: ) or recommend any services/suppliers in particular? Same question for the airbags.

My thought is to replace the passenger airbag while the window is out so that I can remove the dash pabel with a bit more ease - I just hate trying to work in tight corners, especially in this 90F weather we’re having.
passenger airbag is removed from other side of dash. so you need to remove dash first to remove passenger airbag.

as for the windshield - just get right one. they are different depending if you have front camera near rear view mirror or not.
 

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I’m sorry for the dumb question, but as I look over the attachments I don’t quite see which adhesive type is required at each seam location. I suppose the safest default is to use structural adhesive everywhere, but I wasn’t sure if there was more detail that I’ve overlooked saying “structural here” or “seam sealer there”.

A follow-on question. Though I can inspect the various weld locations throughout the body, I was curious if you had available any repair guidance similar to the adhesive detail. For example, I’ve heard various OEMs require more repair spot welds than originally from the factory or they may require spot welds vs lug welds. Do you have any insight into this?
I missed this post somehow, here is some more info on sealers/adhesives and where to use which one...let me see what I can find about the spot welds...
 

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While I hunt for chassis/body pieces I’m thinking I’ll turn my attention to the interior airbags and windshield. Does anyone have experience with windshield replacement? Anything to watch out for (other than then the broken glass :LOL: ) or recommend any services/suppliers in particular? Same question for the airbags.

My thought is to replace the passenger airbag while the window is out so that I can remove the dash panel with a bit more ease - I just hate trying to work in tight corners, especially in this 90F weather we’re having.
I ended up replacing the windshield with OEM because there are not that many aftermarket ones. I also needed an IR windshield so that was that.
I was able to find a new seat airbag on eBay, they became available from time to time. That was brand new OEM, cost me about $350. I located a used curtain airbag from Larry Jr. I would always check with him for dashboard, airbags, body parts etc. to see what he has available. Also, many of your damaged engine compartment pieces like radiator lines, A/C lines, sensors etc. can also be found at Larry's Alfa Parts Exchange business. I would shoot him the list first and see what he has. One stop shop in a sense.

Erdem
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
Over the past week or so I've turned my attention to the interior of the Giulia. As you've seen from the earlier images, the windshield was pretty broken up, so the first order of business was to remove it and clean up opening. After reading through the tech manual and looking for hints online, the approach I used was the piano wire technique (or in my case, spare guitar wire). All-in-all, it wasn't terribly difficult for one person to do and I think that was the result of the window having a large enough hole in the center (which I opened further while working on it). This allowed me to reach inside the cab while working from the outside and "sawing" a string of guitar wire through the sealing bead around the perimeter of the windshield. Some things to note:
  • Glass is sharp... duh... but even with double lined leather rancher gloves it still managed to cut through at times.
  • Glass is sharp... part 2... I found my elbows had all kinds of cuts on them when I was done even without noticing it.
  • Working the wire around the corners of the glass can be difficult and I found a flexible putty knife was helpful to guide it as you worked a sawing motion.
  • The hand on the inside should only be focused on keeping the wire near to the interior glass surface. Doing this will prevent the wire from unintentionally catching on interior trim (front pillar covers and mirror hardware were already removed).
I know that this is something that would have been addressed by a glass replacement technician, but I wanted to do it myself for two reasons. A) I wanted to try it and learn. B) I wanted the windshield out for a number of days (weeks?) until I get a replacement dashboard. I am taking this approach because I've found that working through the windshield opening can be much easier for dash/trim work than trying to reach under the windshield from the front. If I have to replace the windshield anyways I might as well get it out of my way! :)

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Following the removal of the window, I opted to remove the front pair of seats so that I could gain easier access to the dashboard and, in effect, the airbags I need to replace. As I've tinkered on projects I've found its best to simply remove what's in your way rather than try to work around it. Working around it, at least in my experience, leads to more sweat, more headaches, more scuffs, and a worse outcome - its simply better to take the time up front to work smart, not hard.

Anyways, with as much is disconnected as it its, I couldn't obviously move the powered seats forward or backward conveniently enough to remove the 4x bolts securing them to the frame. I did find however, a bit of a work around that I recorded for a video I'll post later on. My hope is that as I come across tips/tricks I can get more videos recorded to share with other enthusiasts.

After removing the seats I had clear and easy access to remove the center console assembly thereby exposing the Airbag Module as well as the numerous fasteners hidden behind trim that secure the dash. Another benefit of removing the seats is that it provide not only the easy access to the dash, but I could work laying down in the car as well as remove the dash easily through the doorway without worry of tearing the seats.

At the same time, I removed the driver's seatbelt due to it being locked from the collision. It, along with the Airbag Module, are being sent out to SafetyRestore for resetting. In parallel, I have managed to locate a replacement dash panel and various airbags which I hope to receive over the next weeks, but for now the Giulia is torn down as far as I need to go before I get to start reassembling it ... probably a good thing too as my wife is getting a bit frustrated with the parts laying all around the garage ;)

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Amazing - 3 months since the last post. Busy with work and trying to find a cost-effective deal for replacing the missing parts to the Giulia.

I got lucky though! Over the past couple of weeks I found a front clip from a 2019 Giulia for sale through a salvage yard in Indiana. After about a week of questions and haggling I made the trip out there to pick up the part and its got me excited again to be working on this car! The donor car was a white car (will need touch-up and repainting to match), but came with a number of good interior dash parts. I've put a few of them up for sale on eBay as I've already repaired the interior of my car and no longer need them. Here's a taste - feel free to message me if you're looking for any repair parts!

2019 Alfa Romeo Giulia TI Sport Dash Panel | eBay

The trip out to Indiana was a good time - I con'd my brother into joining me and we ended up making a detour along the way to pick up a 13 x 36 engine lathe (some good ol' American iron!) to help him with a project he's working on. Nevertheless, we looked like a couple of hillbillies driving home with a half-car strapped on the trailer and a literal-ton of machinery to boot.

Here's a few snapshots of the front-clip I got. The intent is to strip this down to just the frame and rails and start mapping out the unibody seams I need to cut or leave for merging it with my existing car.

Car White Hood Light Vehicle



Hood Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive design
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
A "two-fer" for this evening - knowing that I was going to get the front-clip, I went ahead and scheduled a windshield+installation through Safelite. As with all online services I was a bit skeptical, but was very pleased with the technician they sent out and the work he did. Getting the windshield back allowed me to get the pillar moldings replaced along with the mirror and misc. sensors.

Slooowly, but surely it's starting to come together.

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Hood Road surface Automotive lighting


Vehicle Car Motor vehicle Hood Automotive lighting
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
I spent the last few evenings clearing out the donor body and taking inventory of the parts available and those still needed. Second time now that I've done this, if you count the grey Giulia as the first, and so I'm getting the hang of things albeit this front end had a lot more of the hoses/electrical to consider when compared to the other.

*** side note, Giulia 1 = G1 = grey car and G2 = white car :)

Car White Hood Light Vehicle


Photograph White Motor vehicle Light Hood


After getting it cleared out and looking over the body seams, I plotted a course for adapting the G2 parts to the G1 body. I found using painters tape to identify which seams were required was very helpful as was as having both bodies side by side. I kept referencing the G1 vs G2 to see which side of the seam I was using and if I should use the spot-weld cutter, drill, or sander to get me the parts in the best condition I could. All in all, it went how I envisioned it and I lobbed off the driver-side corner of the G1 body. The only location that gave me a bit of a pain was two hidden spot-welds down hidden within the main rail (see second image below) which caused me to have to cut-up the rail to gain access.

Motor vehicle Automotive tire Bumper Automotive exterior Automotive wheel system


Automotive tire Motor vehicle Hood Bumper Automotive exterior


Automotive lighting Automotive tire Bumper Motor vehicle Asphalt


I had purchased some spot-weld cutters from a company called Blair and was initially pretty pleased with them. However, after going through a few dozen spot welds I was a bit disappointed with how quickly they seemed to dull.

>> Have you guys ever sharpened these type of cutters or have other options to try?
Going forward, here's my plan of attack:
1 - Remove passenger G1 body in similar fashion - probably using the same set of seams as done already on the driver side.
2 - Clean up all interfaces (remove paint, clean off seam sealer, etc.)
3 - Mark out corresponding seams on G2 body and begin removal of donor parts. I believe this will be relatively straight forward as well though the spot-weld/drill/sanding will be the opposite as I'll want the mirrored surface (hole vs flat metal).
4 - Position G2 body in place and prepare for welding. I'll be getting weld-thru primer for the various seams, cavity wax, seam-sealer and structural adhesive (see green areas on the top rib of the cut apron). My plan is to move the entire front end of the G2 body, still bolted together with core support, bumper bracket, and engine cradle onto the G1 body so that the alignment and fit is held fixed. We'll see how it goes!

Any suggestions or tips to keep in mind as I go forward?
 

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Some of the metal on these new Giulias is high tech steel. McGeek posted a link with cool images showing all the different kinds/types of metals the unibody is constructed with. Some of them are probably as hard as the Blair cutter. I can cut 100 or more spot welds on old Giulias (60s-90's) with one double sided Blair cutter. Amazon has several brands to choose from. One came with 10 cutters for $18. Probably China, but it might work better...
 
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I spent the last few evenings clearing out the donor body and taking inventory of the parts available and those still needed. Second time now that I've done this, if you count the grey Giulia as the first, and so I'm getting the hang of things albeit this front end had a lot more of the hoses/electrical to consider when compared to the other.

*** side note, Giulia 1 = G1 = grey car and G2 = white car :)

View attachment 119248

View attachment 119249

After getting it cleared out and looking over the body seams, I plotted a course for adapting the G2 parts to the G1 body. I found using painters tape to identify which seams were required was very helpful as was as having both bodies side by side. I kept referencing the G1 vs G2 to see which side of the seam I was using and if I should use the spot-weld cutter, drill, or sander to get me the parts in the best condition I could. All in all, it went how I envisioned it and I lobbed off the driver-side corner of the G1 body. The only location that gave me a bit of a pain was two hidden spot-welds down hidden within the main rail (see second image below) which caused me to have to cut-up the rail to gain access.

View attachment 119250

View attachment 119251

View attachment 119252

I had purchased some spot-weld cutters from a company called Blair and was initially pretty pleased with them. However, after going through a few dozen spot welds I was a bit disappointed with how quickly they seemed to dull.



Going forward, here's my plan of attack:
1 - Remove passenger G1 body in similar fashion - probably using the same set of seams as done already on the driver side.
2 - Clean up all interfaces (remove paint, clean off seam sealer, etc.)
3 - Mark out corresponding seams on G2 body and begin removal of donor parts. I believe this will be relatively straight forward as well though the spot-weld/drill/sanding will be the opposite as I'll want the mirrored surface (hole vs flat metal).
4 - Position G2 body in place and prepare for welding. I'll be getting weld-thru primer for the various seams, cavity wax, seam-sealer and structural adhesive (see green areas on the top rib of the cut apron). My plan is to move the entire front end of the G2 body, still bolted together with core support, bumper bracket, and engine cradle onto the G1 body so that the alignment and fit is held fixed. We'll see how it goes!

Any suggestions or tips to keep in mind as I go forward?
Great progress man, keep at it. Good work!
Erdem
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
Some of the metal on these new Giulias is high tech steel. McGeek posted a link with cool images showing all the different kinds/types of metals the unibody is constructed with.
If you come across the link, would you mind sharing it? I did a brief search of the forum, but was unable to locate it. Thanks!
 

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I googled blair spot weld cutter, and found ads for many others, some on amazon. Or search amazon for spot weld cutters. Many listed.
 

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